Lectionary arrangement?


#1

Why isn’t the lectionary in chronological/book-by-book approach?

I was reading. May 15,2014 Gosspel and almost thought it was after the ressurection of JC (since we are in Easter season). I get very confused with the layout of the lectionary. Any tips to make it easier for the lay faithful?


#2

Because it follows the Liturgical Calendar, not the order of the canons.

peace and all Good!


#3

What order do you have in mind? (I can think of several ways of interpreting “chronological/book-by-book.”)

I was reading. May 15,2014 Gosspel and almost thought it was after the ressurection of JC (since we are in Easter season).

One difficulty in this particular case is that there is relatively little in the canonical gospels that follows the Resurrection. Suppose that we were devising a weekday lectionary for the several weeks of the Easter season; also suppose that a guiding principle for the gospel readings were to limit ourselves to that material. Since there isn’t very much of it, we could have a lot of repetition, we could have very short gospel readings, or maybe we could try some of each approach. In any case, the result would look strange.

So I can easily see this practical reason for not being “chronological,” although I also imagine that it’s potentially fruitful to consider earlier events and sayings in light of the Resurrection.

I get very confused with the layout of the lectionary. Any tips to make it easier for the lay faithful?

One tip may to be study the arrangement of the lectionary for a better sense of its order.

For example, “Weekday Masses for Years I & II in the Seasons of Lent and Easter” (in the 1998/2002 United States edition)–I like this website–has a convenient listing of citations. After the Octave of Easter, the gospel readings for weekdays are almost all from before the Resurrection (the exceptions are at the end of the season), with particular emphasis on John 3, John 6, and John 13-17.


#4

**John 3, 6, and 13-17 are the essence of the teachings of Christ, and the Easter Season is the ideal time to present those readings again: Chapter 3 - Baptism and Rebirth, Chapter 6 - the Eucharist, Chapter 13 - Loving and serving our neighbors, Chapter 14 - Explanation of the Holy Trinity (Christ as Son and God, and the telling of the advent of the Holy Spirit), Chapter 15 and 16 - Things we will face as followers of Christ, Chapter 17 - Christ’s prayer for us (showing God’s Plan, and Christ’s obedience to the Father, and his love for us). **


#5

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