Left Behind Series


#1

What do you think about the Left Behind Series of books and tapes?


#2

They are well written, page turning, have terrible theology, and are anti-Catholic. They are like junk food, when you read them you can’t wait to get more. The fact that they tell an engaging plot/story gets people into them very fast and very easily. Once people are in they start to believe what they are reading, whether it is the anti-Catholic nature or the terrible theology behind them. The same is true about Dan Brown and his books, which are notoriously anti-Catholic. Whether we like it our not these books shape other people’s and our own perceptions of the Catholic Church.

We need good authors who are Catholic who write novels that people want to read!!!


#3

They are an enjoyable fictional story of the end times. They tend to have some anti-Catholic themes. But they also have brought both Catholics and Protestant into a deeper relationship with Christ. I stopped reading them a few books ago because I the fictional story no longer kept my interest because of the improper doctrine. Good books that have done good. Bad doctrine that have done some harm.


#4

If you would like to know what Carl Olsen thinks:
nativityukr.org/various_files/Rapture_article.html

Tim LaHaye plagerized the story from a early 1970’s novel called “666”. The story is virtually the same. Of course, he (LaHaye) is making millions off of the whole series. Not bad for a BJU grad. Wonder how much he tithes…


#5

[quote=Michael]What do you think about the Left Behind Series of books and tapes?
[/quote]

Interesting ‘fiction’, but it doesn’t follow the Church’s teaching.
After finding how popular the were becomming, and draaaaaaging them out to more volumes (more money), i then found them boooorrrrrreiiinnnng. :frowning:

Kotton :stuck_out_tongue:


#6

The further you go into the series, the worse the writing gets and the loonier the plot gets. The authors really hate Catholics.

A lot of the mainstream Protestant Denominations don’t encourage their members to read these books.


#7

Indeed, this book series was great to read, but it was a bunch of malarkey. Very anti-Catholic, and according to the Catholic Answers Special Report, the ideas were not LaHaye’s. Salem Kirban’s “666” was much like this book series.


#8

After the first one (which is decent), each one gets progressively worse and drawn-out, in my opinion.

Otherwise…it’s an interesting concept, but clearly contrary to the teachings of the Church and even the Bible.


#9

Toss them away and buy Michael O’Brien’s “Children of the Last Days” series. The theology is solid and the characterization, plotting, and writing are orders of magnitude beyond LaHaye and Jenkins.


#10

Tell more about this the “Children of the Last Days series” Are they anti-Catholic? I have not heard of them but will look for them. I just ran across the LaHaye books in the local library just before they started being front page news. I started listening to the books on tape series and finished 10 volumes. I did not see the antiCatholic slant until later in the series but since it was fiction I never thought it would create such an uproar. I have not read the Devinci Code and do not plan to but I do read the commentaries from Catholic Answers about it and I have seen a program on discovery channel. I think Dan Brown is really off the wall with his ideas and will not pay good money for his work.


#11

Tell more about this the “Children of the Last Days series” Are they anti-Catholic?

Absolutely not! :slight_smile: Michael O’Brien is a devout Catholic and the books are written from that perspective. They take place largely in Canada in a future where the government has become very hostile to religion (not much of a stretch really). The books are “connected” to each other by characters and events but they are not something that needs to be read in a particular order like the Left Behind books are. O’Brien’s books can each stand alone as novels in their own right.

The titles are:

Strangers and Sojourners
Plague Journal
Eclipse of the Sun
and Father Elijah

He’s got a new one out called Cry of Stone but I don’t know if it’s part of the same series. Everything of his that I’ve read is very powerful. It’s interesting also that O’Brien manages (without endorsing wrong theology) to portray faith driven non-Catholic Christians in a very positive light.

I think the books are published by Ignatius Press. I’m not sure if you’d find them at a public library. Kudos to the library if you do.

I think Dan Brown is really off the wall with his ideas and will not pay good money for his work.

I’m sort of in the same boat. I did read one of Brown’s earlier books (Angels and Demons) before he became a household name. He actually writes well. It’s a shame he has such an anti-Christian agenda to his work.


#12

(Very early on in this Forum, I posted a thread about the END TIMES and Left Behind Series). However this my thoughts on the books themselves are very hokey.
The characters are believable at first, but the plot and likehood of a band of 'a few renegades fly around the world with an umlimited supply of gasoline, airplanes, and wireless computers and phones AND get away with making the antichrist look like a fool is totally foolish indeed.
Meanwhile, the rest of the Christian population is struggling to make it from day to day.

The Left Behind Series is probably good for one thing…doorstops and paperweights.

go with God!
Edwin


#13

As a Protestant I considered them junk. I tend to be a-millenial/post-millenial, depending on what I’m studying about eschatology at the time.

The closest I get to Lahaye’s views is that I have given thought to ‘historic pre-millenialism’ which asserts that Christians go through the ‘tribulation’ but miss the ‘short time’ of God’s wrath in the last few weeks or months of the end times. Even then–those who are ‘left behind’ are not ignorant of what has happened: as I understand it, Christ’s return for His Saints was fully visible and not secretive, and those who remain behind are those who have absolutely hardened themselves against God and spend their remaining days girding themselves to wage war against Him. Very different from the view of pre-tribulationism laid out in this series of novels.

Though you’d have a hard time realizing this from the number of books on eschatology found in popular Protestant bookstores, pre-millenial/pre-tribulational eschatology is actually a minority viewpoint even among Evangelical Christians: Lutherans, Presbyterians, ‘Campbellite’ (Christian Churches or Churches of Christ), Reformed, and several others take official positions against this view. In other denominations, it’s considered a ‘peripheral’ subject and there is liberty to hold one of several views–often the view of the presiding pastor prevails, but not always so.


#14

Well, I grew up protestant. And the Southern Baptist churches teach this sort of stuff. At least, they used to. Back in the mid 70’s, there were a series of movies about the “tribulation.” The first one was called “A Thief in the Night.” Or something along those lines. At the time, I believed in that stuff. Why? Because it was taught by people I trusted. Thank God I found out the truth!!


#15

Many Southern Baptists–many Evangelical Baptists of any stripe–“Primitive Baptist”, “Bible Baptist”, etcetera–were long heavily influenced by an exegetical strategy known as ‘Dispensationalism’. Although a few in the Dispensationalist camp are post-tribulationalist or even post-millenialist, the bulk of the movement is pre-trib/pre-mill. Dallas Theological Seminary has churned out a great many of these types.

Assemblies of God/Churches of God and various other Pentecostal/Charismatic churches (including many of the modern Protestant mega-churches), are much less likely to be dispensationalist but most of them are ‘adventist’ in eschatology (the small ‘a’ in adventist implies they expect the imminent ‘advent’ or ‘return’ of Jesus. Nothing to do with Seventh-day Adventism). Therefore they also tend to support the ‘rapturism’ of Left Behind typebooks. Since the Baptists and the Pentecostals are two of the largest and fastest-growing Protestant denominations, the Protestant bookstores pander to their interests. You can still find books on other views if you know what you’re looking for, but only ‘if’.


#16

The Left Behind Series is probably good for one thing…doorstops and paperweights.

On C.A. Live one day, Karl K. suggested that a good use for the books would be “mulch.” I almost drove off the road laughing.


#17

I have peruse some of the books. I found them childishly written. I already knew that the left-behind theory was the latest new-fangled thing coming from some protestant denomination. I least the theory sounded new to me, for the simple reason I had never heard of the it.

When I read the verses from where the theory is extracted, I just shook my head. I just cannot believe how some people come to such convoluted conclusions while reading the Bible.


#18

My dad bought them (my parents are still Protestant), and while they are engaging enough to keep you reading, the theology is bad and the writing level is very low. I was surprised to find what a simplistic writing style was being used. I was disappointed to see that they were anti-Catholic, as I had remembered the author (LaHaye) fondly from his appearances to give talks at my summer camp as a child. Catholicism didn’t come up then (that I remember) and I hadn’t read his other books, so I was sorry to see how biased he was against Catholics.

One concern of mine is that folks will read these books and assume that if they don’t want to make a decision or live a good life now, that they can wait until after everyone’s taken, and then change. Granted, they’d have to put up with an unpleasant time on earth, but I’d be willing to bet that there would be many who would take that risk.


#19

Is it true that, according to them, only 144,00 will be “raptured”? Does it include babies, baptized or not?

Pio


#20

[quote=Katia]My dad bought them (my parents are still Protestant), and while they are engaging enough to keep you reading, the theology is bad and the writing level is very low. I was surprised to find what a simplistic writing style was being used. I was disappointed to see that they were anti-Catholic, as I had remembered the author (LaHaye) fondly from his appearances to give talks at my summer camp as a child. Catholicism didn’t come up then (that I remember) and I hadn’t read his other books, so I was sorry to see how biased he was against Catholics.

One concern of mine is that folks will read these books and assume that if they don’t want to make a decision or live a good life now, that they can wait until after everyone’s taken, and then change. Granted, they’d have to put up with an unpleasant time on earth, but I’d be willing to bet that there would be many who would take that risk.
[/quote]

La Haye is actually the consultant. Jerry Jenkins is the writer. While I don’t believe that Jenkins is quite as anti-Catholic as some seem to think (I listened to him give some presentations recently at a university in Seattle), I do share some of your concerns.


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