Lending altar to other denomination

Hello everyone. This is my very first posting.

I was shocked to hear that the Cathedral of Tokyo Archdiocese is going to lend their basilica to Episcopal church for the commemoration of 150 years Anniversary in Japan.

Isn’t that a profanation for the altar? I thought that Catholic altars are not supposed to be touched by the priests/pastors of other denominations.
To make it clear, I looked up “the general instruction of the Roman Missal” to find the reason why altars should not be lent to other churches, but no results.

I appreciate your comments.

I believe it can be done but certain procedures must be followed such as removing the Eucharist to another place. Possibly using a different altar than the main one- not sure of the details.

Angelic - Welcome To The Forums!!

Now, I may be wrong but…I think you may be confusing apples and oranges. It is acceptable for the Chruch to allow one of her buildings to be used by another denomination as long as certain previsions are followed (as Seatuck said, e.g. removing the Blessed Sacrament from the Tabernacle). Many parishes have opened their churches to other denominations displaced by flood, fire, etc. and vice-versa.

That being the case, even when used with permission by another group, the altar itself should never have anything placed on it and should not be used as part of whatever ceremony the other denomination is using the building for.

My first assumption would be that the Archbishop of Tokyo knows and understands the laws involved in the use of his cathedral by any other group.

You may find this helpful: ewtn.com/library/Liturgy/zlitur116.htm

An excerpt:

"137. Catholic churches are consecrated or blessed buildings which have an important theological and liturgical significance for the Catholic community. They are therefore generally reserved for Catholic worship. However, if priests, ministers or communities not in full communion with the Catholic Church do not have a place or the liturgical objects necessary for celebrating worthily their religious ceremonies, the diocesan Bishop may allow them the use of a church or a Catholic building and also lend them what may be necessary for their services. Under similar circumstances, permission may be given to them for interment or for the celebration of services at Catholic cemeteries.

In this age of diabolical disorientation the Church is allowing this. But your being offended at this shows your Catholic sensibilities are still working and you’re rightly offended - as am I.

A near-by, and very liberal parish, allowed the Jewish community to use the building [not the sanctuary] for their High Holy Days. One little old lady wandered in watched a bit and left. On the way our she was heard to say, “That was weird even for this parish.” :smiley:

Come, come, now.

Look at it this way ; you’d be surprised at how many non-Catholics have never set foot in a Catholic church, and have the weirdest ideas about the prominence given to Our Lady and so on.

Getting them through the doors could be the first step to getting them interested in the Faith.

I was shocked to hear that the Cathedral of Tokyo Archdiocese is going to lend their basilica to Episcopal church for the commemoration of 150 years Anniversary in Japan.


**I wonder how many people here know that the Japanese name for the Japanese Anglican church is NIPPON SEI KO KAI–which literally means “Holy Catholic Church of Japan”?

For that matter during the American Civil War, erstwhile Episcopalians in the South used the name “Confederate Catholic Church.”**

When a local Romanian Orthodox church had a fire, our (previous) pastor let them use the Church for Divine Liturgy while theirs was being repaired.

I was aware of this.

Actually, they did not. There was a proposal to name the new body the Reformed Catholic Church, to emphasize continuity, but that failed, as did a proposal to omit the word *Protestant *from the body’s name. In the end, the body’s official name during its short life was the Protestant Episcopal Church of the Confederate States of America.

I think there would be a significant difference between an Orthodox Church and an Episcopal community using the altar. The Orthodox would be celebrating a valid Eucharist.

Thank you all for the comments.
It was a bit surprising to know that John Paul II has issued the Directory for Ecumenism which allowed the Church to lend the buildings/altars to other denominations in case of necessity, but if this is what Rome directs, I have nothing more to say to the archbishop of Tokyo. I especially thank SuscipeMeDomine for giving me the insight.
Last but not least, I was glad to hear some of you have same kind of sensibility toward the holy altar as I do.

Why was this surprising? John Paul’s ecumenical activity was mind-numbing; he brought us the famous Assisi gathering, visited the Roman Synagogue, prayed with Muslims, apologized to various religious groups and met with pretty much everyone.

I don’t feel any problem concerning pope’s making peaceful dialogue with other denominations and non-christian religions nor his apology.
But for me, Eucharist and altars are the core of Catholic’s heart and don’t want to be touched by non-believers.

:blush:

Even though the CATHOLIC CHURCH says this:

“137. Catholic churches are consecrated or blessed buildings which have an important theological and liturgical significance for the Catholic community. They are therefore generally reserved for Catholic worship. However, if priests, ministers or communities not in full communion with the Catholic Church do not have a place or the liturgical objects necessary for celebrating worthily their religious ceremonies, **the diocesan Bishop may allow them the use of a church or a Catholic building and also lend them what may be necessary for their services. **Under similar circumstances, permission may be given to them for interment or for the celebration of services at Catholic cemeteries.”

We still have people who feel the need to say things like:

Stunning. I guess dissent from what the Church directs comes in many flavors.

“I know better…” :shrug:

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