"Let All Mortal Flesh..." during Lent


#1

Hello all!

I plan the liturgies for the school where I teach and need some advice on whether or not to use a particular song during Lent.

I know, of course, that the Alleluia before the Gospel is prohibited during Lent, but does prohibition extend to all songs containing any use of the word?

I would like to continue to use “Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence” as the Eucharistic hymn, but the fourth verse is:

At His feet the six wingèd seraph,
Cherubim with sleepless eye,
Veil their faces to the presence,
As with ceaseless voice they cry:
"Alleluia, Alleluia
Alleluia, Lord Most High! "

Would it be permissible to use this?

Thanks.


#2

It is a most beautiful Hymn. Full male choir… all stops pulled. the back wall of the Church vibrating!! I don’t see anything wrong with it. If the priest has problems pull the forth verse. Wonderful choice.


#3

The General Instructionof the Roman Missal under the section on communion (87) allows a hymn from:

[LIST]
*]Antiphon with or without Psalm from Graduale Romanum
*]Antiphon with Psalm from Graduale Simplex
*]other approved
[/LIST]
GIRM 87 appears differently in the Universal version vs England and Wales or United States adaptations.


#4

This is one of my favourite hymns. I just wish that my parish choir would sing it…on occasion.


#5

I love this hymn, I had it at my wedding!

The index at the back of our hymn books (not an official liturgical document) states it is for use outside of Lent.

If I were you, I would use the hymn but leave out that verse. Especially for a school liturgy you probably have a printed booklet rather than reading from the hymn books, so just don’t print it.


#6

We are not suppose to use the words Alleluia during Lent I believe


#7

It is such a beautiful hymn. I haven’t heard it at Mass in well over 20 years. Sad.


#8

I don’t see a problem with those lyrics. They fit nicely into the Gospel reading from Mark.

[BIBLEDRB]Mark 2:19[/BIBLEDRB]

The angels are with the bridegroom which reminds us that we are not. That’s a very Lenten theme.


#9

Nice Hymn, no Alleluia’s during lent


#10

I always thought it works best in the Christmas season.


#11

Lots of protestants sing this hymn during advent and Christmas because, to them, the Real Presence is both disgusting and simply false. So making the hymn about the nativity makes more sense for them. But originally it is about communion amd the truth that the consecrated Host truly is the body of Christ!


#12

I don’t know the hymn but you definitely **cannot **use that 4th verse during Lent! No, no, no.


#13

If I recall correctly, the ban on alleluia during Lent is a ban for the response “Alleluia” sung or proclaimed before the Gospel reading. It is not a ban on the word “alleluia” in other places during the mass.

I feel the joy of the word “alleluia” otherwise may not fit the tone of the Lenten season, however.


#14

:thumbsup:


#15

:eek: You mean I don’t have to call it “the A-word” during Lent anymore?!?!


:stuck_out_tongue: :smiley:


#16

You cannot use alleluia in the liturgy. This includes hymns.


#17

we also don’t use “Allelulia” during the Liturgy of the Hours.


#18

I hear this from time to time but have never been able to find an actual Church document that says so. Do you have one?


#19

I don’t know. It is also gone from all the places in the LOTH where it is normally said, including the canticles from Scripture (e.g. Revelation) which have it as part of a Bible reading, and the Patristic readings seem to indicate that it is completely gone. The GIRM only mandates the removal before the Gospel because that’s the only place it is compulsory in the first place, but I think the understanding is that we refrain from using it anywhere else too.


#20

The restriction of using or proclaiming Alleluia includes the entire liturgy. the Songs used are part of the liturgy.


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