Let this be recorded for a generation to come,


#1

Psalm 102 is a very interesting Psalm.

Here are a few verses taken from this Psalm:

Psalm 102:18: Let this be recorded for a generation to come,
so that a people yet to be created may praise the Lord:

Psalm 102:3 :For my days pass away like smoke,
and my bones burn like a furnace.

Psalm 102:13-14: You will arise and have pity on Zion;
it is the time to favor her; the appointed time has come.
For your servants hold her stones dear and have pity on her dust.

Psalm 102:15-17: Nations will fear the name of the Lord,
and all the kings of the earth will fear your glory.For the Lord builds up Zion;
he appears in his glory; he regards the prayer of the destitute
and does not despise their prayer.

Concerning those who hold the stones of Zion as dear and have pity on her dust?

generationword.com/jerusalem101/37-western-wall.html

**
Mercy and truth are met together; righteousness and peace have kissed each other**.


#2

[quote="mercytruth, post:1, topic:316964"]
Psalm 102 is a very interesting Psalm.

Here are a few verses taken from this Psalm:

Psalm 102:18: Let this be recorded for a generation to come,
so that a people yet to be created may praise the Lord:

Psalm 102:3 :For my days pass away like smoke,
and my bones burn like a furnace.

Psalm 102:13-14: You will arise and have pity on Zion;
it is the time to favor her; the appointed time has come.
For your servants hold her stones dear and have pity on her dust.

Psalm 102:15-17: Nations will fear the name of the Lord,
and all the kings of the earth will fear your glory.For the Lord builds up Zion;
he appears in his glory; he regards the prayer of the destitute
and does not despise their prayer.

Concerning those who hold the stones of Zion as dear and have pity on her dust?

generationword.com/jerusalem101/37-western-wall.html

**
Mercy and truth are met together; righteousness and peace have kissed each other**.

[/quote]

don't getcha....... explain a little


#3

[quote="SonSearcher, post:2, topic:316964"]
don't getcha....... explain a little

[/quote]

According to verse 18 of this Psalm, it is a Psalm written for a future generation, a people yet to be created that they may praise the LORD.

(Now this is **strictly my take **on the Psalm):

verse 3: reminds me of the victims of the Holocaust, (along with many of the proceeding verses).

verses 13-14 reminds me of the Jewish survivors of the Holocaust who have returned to Zion, and of those who hold the ancient stones and remnants of the fallen Temple of Zion as dear.

Thus my link to the various pictures that are available of Jerusalem, 2000 years later.... after the recovery of the ancient ruins that are now being restored. Are we of that future generation?

God's peace

micah


#4

[quote="mercytruth, post:3, topic:316964"]
According to verse 18 of this Psalm, it is a Psalm written for a future generation, a people yet to be created that they may praise the LORD.

(Now this is **strictly my take **on the Psalm):

verse 3: reminds me of the victims of the Holocaust, (along with many of the proceeding verses).

verses 13-14 reminds me of the Jewish survivors of the Holocaust who have returned to Zion, and of those who hold the ancient stones and remnants of the fallen Temple of Zion as dear.

Thus my link to the various pictures that are available of Jerusalem, 2000 years later.... after the recovery of the ancient ruins that are now being restored. Are we of that future generation?

God's peace

micah

[/quote]

I am not entirely sure a generation to come means one at a later date. I think it might mean for the entirety of the next generation that is coming.


#5

[quote="SonSearcher, post:4, topic:316964"]
I am not entirely sure a generation to come means one at a later date. I think it might mean for the entirety of the next generation that is coming.

[/quote]

I am giving you quotations from Haydock's commentary of verses 14-17:

**Ver. 14. Come. Pointed out; (Jeremias xxix. 10.; Calmet) or David wishes to repair the ravages caused by Absalom, or foretells the return from captivity, (Haydock) and the grace granted to the Church, and to every faithful soul. (Worthington)

Ver. 15. Thereof. They had a great regard for the very soil, 4 Kings v. 17. (Calmet) --- Hebrew, "dust," as it was then uncultivated. (Berthier) --- Esdras, &c., repaired the ruins of Sion, as Christ and his apostles established the Church. (Menochius)

Ver. 16. Glory. The conversion of nations is often predicted as about to take place after the captivity; yet not so fully, till the time of Christ. (Calmet) --- His glory is so manifest, that all kings know it, although they be not converted. (Worthington)

Ver. 17. Seen. Dwelling with us, John i. (Haydock) --- Jerusalem had attained its ancient splendour before the coming of the Messias. (Calmet)**

Verse 14 is interpreted as King David returning to Jerusalem after fleeing from his son Absalom, or foretells the 'return from captivity' (probably the Babylonian captivity of the Jewish people returning during the time of Ezra and Nehemiah)

Or, verse 14 showing 'pity on Zion' and 'the time to favor her', for 'it is the appointed time' is referring to the Church. (Zion representing the Church, and not literal Jerusalem).

Verse 15 interprets the 'dust' as the 'uncultivated soil' that is, the uncoverted perhaps?
Repairing the ruins of Zion, is interpreted as Christ and his apostles establishing the church, and not a literal repairing of the ancient ruins of Jerusalem at this present time.

Verse 16 is interpreted as the fear of the nations as to their conversion (as the Church), and not a literal witness of a literal Jerusalem being rebuilt as a sign to the nations at this present time.

Verse 17 is interpreted as Zion or Jerusalem having been rebuilt during the time of King Herod before the birth and appearance of Jesus Christ. Not the rebuilding of present day Jerusalem before the second coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.

So this Psalm is interpreted from 1859 as one that is speaking of Zion as the Church, or as Zion in the past that had been rebuilt during the time of Ezra, or of King Herod.

Not since the early church fathers did anyone expect the Jewish people to be gathered back in the land and Jerusalem to be rebuilt. So this Psalm was interpreted from what was presumed, and not what has since happened.


#6

verse 19 of the title is interpreted as :

Ver. 19. Generation. Literally, "in another," by the subsequent writers of the Old and New Testaments. (Haydock) --- Let all posterity become acquainted with this psalm, and know under what obligations we have been to the Lord. --- Created. The Jews after the captivity, and, in a higher sense, (Calmet) Christians, the new creature, 2 Corinthians v. 17. (Calmet) (Worthington) --- This interpretation seems much the better, as kings and nations were converted only by the Messias, and his apostles. (Berthier)

"The Jews after the captivity' is ambiguous. It probably refers to the Babylonian captivity, and not the diaspora of the Jews from the land of Israel in the first and second centuries A.D.

God' peace be with you

micah


#7

Where is the commentary on verse 18?


#8

[quote="SonSearcher, post:7, topic:316964"]
Where is the commentary on verse 18?

[/quote]

The Haydock commentary of 1859 is using the Douay Rheims translation which sometimes splits verses, or combines verses so that in this case, verse 18 of the ESV is known as verse 19 of the Douay Rheims. The Douay Rheims also numbers Psalm 102 as Psalm 101. (as you can see, the ESV translates this verse as 'a generation to come', and the Douay Rheims translates it as 'another generation'.

Here is the complete Haydock's commentary of Psalm 101 (Psalm 102)
haydock1859.tripod.com/id826.html

In the left column is the commentary verse by verse, in the right column is Psalm 101
(102) verse by verse.

God's peace

micah


#9

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