Lgbt dissidents welcomed by methodists

Bill Donohue comments on a story in today’s Philadelphia Inquirer about LGBT dissident Catholics turning to Methodists for recognition:

It is hardly surprising that the World Meeting of Families Congress, which is being hosted by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, would insist that this Catholic event feature Catholic speakers. Yet the Philadelphia Inquirer still treats as breaking news the rejection of groups that have publicly professed their rejection of key Catholic teachings.

The four dissident Catholic LGBT groups that are not welcome to engage in mutiny at this event are New Ways Ministry, Dignity USA, Fortunate Families, and Call to Action. But they have been invited to hold fort at a local Methodist church. Good for them. They have finally found a home.

catholicleague.org/lgbt-dissidents-welcomed-by-methodists/

I tend to like Methodists, they seem to be genetally decent people. But if these groups would rather abandon the one true faith and throw their lot in with the Methodists then that’s up to them. I wonder do these Methodists know what they’re letting themselves in for by letting groups like ‘Call to action’ in through their doors.

I agree.

American Methodists seem to be different to our Methodists, who remain one of the few “traditionally conservative Protestant” denominations left around. Let them do it. God gave them free will and He gives us the command to help them find Him once again.

Methodists are great folk. If you study their beginnings, and their current focus, they are a very charitable and kind group of Christians. That is the “pro” side of the list from this outside observer.

The only “con” I have [other than the fact that it isn’t the Catholic Church] is that when I drive by the local, huge, Methodist Church here in town on a Tuesday night, or a Wednesday, or a Thursday, or even a Saturday afternoon, no one is there. Big Church, big empty parking lots.

It seems there is almost always something going on at our church, Monday through Sunday. The outside sometimes is a reflection of the inside.

Have never been a big fan of Bill Donahue’s and how he sometimes comes across. His personality can just come across to me a bit too brash for my tastes. And I will note the UMC is one of the mainline denominations that has not come around to an understanding in support of civil marriage equality. But I nevertheless agree with Mr Donahue when he says, “Good for them. They have finally found a home.” Many and not only LGBT, have found spiritual homes.

You realize that these groups are not leaving the RCC. They are just being offered space by the nearby Methodist Church during the World Meeting of Families, since they were not invited to attend the official event.

Good catch Compline. Donahue must have just meant, good for them they found a home for the event. I can never be sure about Donahue though in print. It’s easier for me when I see him speak and and am able to actually hear his tone.

My understanding is that ‘Call to action’ members were excommunicated as a whole in the diocese of Lincoln unless they met an ultimatum to stop their involvement with this group.

‘Call to action’ is not a Catholic group so why should anyone even consider permitting them to organise anything on premises belonging to the Church or allow them to take part in Catholic events?

If the Methodists want to allow such groups to use their premises then that’s up to them I suppose.

I think the case is similar here in Canada, where the Methodist Church joined with the Congregationalists and a majority of Presbyterians to form the United Church of Canada, which is now a very liberal church.

There does seem to be also a Free Methodist Church in Canada (FMCIC), operating in Quebec and points west, and also at least one United Methodist Church operating in BC.

But aren’t there a lot of groups that are made up of Catholics that aren’t officially part of the Church structure? They identify as Catholics and talk about things Catholic and plan events around things Catholic. I can see where you would put them in different categories, but to say that don’t have a right to participate in other Catholic events seems a bit confusing to me.

But aren’t there a lot of groups that are made up of Catholics that aren’t officially part of the Church structure? They identify as Catholics and talk about things Catholic and plan events around things Catholic. I can see where you would put them in different categories, but to say that don’t have a right to participate in other Catholic events seems a bit confusing to me.

This story holds a special irony for me. Since I used to be Methodist.

Even excommunicated Catholics, whether Call to Action members or not, are still Catholics according to the Catholic Church and regardless of whether they are in the Lincoln diocese or not. And they already are allowed to take part in an even bigger Catholic event if they so choose. So I’m with ComplineSanFran. Confused why you and Bill Donahue and others would shut them off from other events. Plus I don’t personally see how shutting them out helps to get them more to the place where you may want to see them. I know in my case, shutting me out, would only make me run further away. In fact in a case like this, I might be inclined to perhaps even run to the premises where I was allowed and more welcomed. People like the idea of feeling welcomed.

[quote=Brendan 64;13209629.
]

Brendan, I see you are in the UK as well.

Just in case and to avoid confusion, ‘Call to Acton’ is not to be confused with ACTA, (A Call to Action’) which is active in the UK and is most definitely a Catholic organisation, devoted to respectful dialogue and nothing to do with any LGBT pressure groups. Our main concern is the shortage of clergy and what can be done.
[/quote]

Most groups have not had their members excommunicated en masse from a Catholic diocese for being part of that group.

They dissent from Church teaching. Any group that dissents from Church teaching should not be allowed to meet on Church premises or attend Catholic events. All Catholics are required to assent to all Church teachings, without exception (perhaps the Anglican Communion take a different approach?). Having groups at Catholic events effectively telling the faithful that what the Church teaches is wrong and needs to change and that it is OK as a Catholic to think like this, is reason enough not to permit them to attend, let alone the fact that their members were excommunicated in a Catholic diocese for being part of that group.

And yes excommunicated Catholics are still Catholics, but the reason for the excommunication of these Catholics was the being members of ‘Call to Action’. Should the Church really then permit this group to set up a stall at a Catholic event in order for them to propagate their views, the very views that led to excommunications from the Church?

The Bishop of Lancaster recently said of ACTA “I need to make it clear here that in my judgement, as Diocesan Bishop, ACTA moves well beyond its self-described aim of ‘dialogue’ on controversial issues on its agenda and so does not provide an assured authentic forum or interpretation of sound Catholic teaching and sound pastoral practice in this diocese.”

catholicherald.co.uk/news/2015/03/30/bishop-of-lancaster-rebukes-acta/

Unfortunately they have bought in to Protestant theology…
…If ya don’t like the rules where you are then by all means Protest.
…If that doesn’t work by golly you can start your own church & fabricate new rules.
…Rules that are suited more to your liking.

Everyone can sit around and watch “I am jazz” & “I am cait” and celebrate buggery.

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