Liturgical Books

I would like to ask some questions about the publication of liturgical books; their translation into vernacular languages; alterations that may be made to them.

  1. Am I correct that when a liturgical book is published by the Holy See it is called the editio typica?

  2. Am I correct in my understanding that episcopal conferences then take the following steps:
    a. they translate the liturgical book into the vernacular and may alter the liturgical book;
    b. when the translation and changes are complete they approve it;
    c. it then goes to the Holy See to be reviewed and may receive recognitio;
    d. if recognitio is received the episcopal conference promulgates it.

  3. Is a liturgical book in vernacular and with any changes then called an editio typica altera?

  4. If liturgy is celebrated in Latin is the editio typica published by the Holy See used or because episcopal conferences may make alterations to liturgical books, will episcopal conferences have a Latin editio typica altera that is used in its territory?

  5. Can an episcopal conference produce liturgical books of their own, where no such liturgical book has been published by the Holy See?

Thanks

Matthew

Essentially. It is promulgated in Latin and translations will flow from that edition.

Yes. When it has a majority vote (2/3rds in the US) then it is sent to the Holy See for possible approval

Not to my knoweldge.

The offical Latin text would be used not an adapted one. Adpations are in the vernacular.

Not sure if this has been done. I guess a conference could publish a book for Benediction services for example.

Cool! I didn’t know how this worked, and I’m pretty “in the loop” on this sort of thing. Thanks!

Originally Posted by Matthew Holford
3. Is a liturgical book in vernacular and with any changes then called an editio typica altera?

Do you know what editio typica altera means? and when is it used?

Originally Posted by Matthew Holford
4. If liturgy is celebrated in Latin is the editio typica published by the Holy See used or because episcopal conferences may make alterations to liturgical books, will episcopal conferences have a Latin editio typica altera that is used in its territory?

So, can an episcopal conference not make any changes in the Latin? For example, I’m thinking of additional prayers an episcopal conference may approve that weren’t in the original; the adaptations that episcopal conferences can make to the various ritual books (e.g. baptism, confirmation, marriage).

The Latin word altera means other, but can mean second.

There second editon of the Missale Romanum in 1975 was altera. If you are wondering about the process of promulgation to confirmation by the Holy See, here is what has happened with the Missale Romanum and U.S. Sacramentary (not including the U.S. GIRM):

1969 Missale Romanum, editio typica, promulgated
1969 Order of Mass Confirmed
1970 Order of Mass Approved
1973 U.S. Sacramentary Approved
1974 U.S. Sacramentary Confirmed

1975 Missale Romanum, editio typica altera, promulgated
1985 U.S. Revised Sacramentary Published
1998 U.S. Revised Sacramentary Final Text (rejected formally in 2002)

2000 Missale Romanum, editio typica tertia, promulgated
2002 U.S. Revised Sacramentary Rejected
2006 Order of Mass Approved
2008 Order of Mass Confirmed
2009 U.S. Roman Missal Approved
2010 U.S. Roman Missal Confirmed
2010 U.S. Revised Sacramentary Approved
??? U.S. Revised Sacramentary Confirmed

If those changes are ones within the scope defined within the GIRM and the Missal itself, yes, they can make those changes for the localized version in both latin and the vernacular. Note that the US English missal has a number of options not in the Latin, but that’s because they didn’t ask for permission to put them in the latin.

If not, then the conference votes on it, and if they get a 2/3 majority, ask Rome for the change, and then, if Rome permits, they may implement the change.

Rome has, in some cases, permitted such changes conference-wide, in others restricted them to individual bishop’s discretion, in others still, allowed them on a pastor-by-pastor level. And in most cases, Rome has simply said, “No.”

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