liturgical music

I was wondering if anyone could give me some guidance? I have been given direction that some music we sing is to be removed from our worship. it is said to be in opposition to the church teaching and the doctrine of vox Dei is quoted. I can not find anything on this doctrine… can anybody help me?

vox Dei as it was explained to me is when we pray or sing and assume the voice of God.

Thank you!

I wouldn’t call this a doctrine, but the idea that hymns sung during Mass should be direct *to *God (and not the other way around) makes sense.

I, for one, am tired of singing sappy hymns that place the singer in God’s shoes, so-to-speak. One song that comes to mind is “I am the bread of life.” It’s a fine religious song, and some may even find it spiritual. But I’m not sure how anyone could consider it as being “liturgical.”

I have heard that the USCCB is in the process of publishing a Directory of Liturgical Music, to be approved by the bishops and then (hopefully) sent to Rome for the appropriate recognitio.

In Manibus Dei,

  • muledog

[quote=justjim4him]I was wondering if anyone could give me some guidance? I have been given direction that some music we sing is to be removed from our worship. it is said to be in opposition to the church teaching and the doctrine of vox Dei is quoted. I can not find anything on this doctrine… can anybody help me?

vox Dei as it was explained to me is when we pray or sing and assume the voice of God.

Thank you!
[/quote]

Some people dislike voice of God songs for a variety of reasons, but there are no liturgical documents that prohibit them. There is no church teaching that prohibits them, and there is no such thing as a doctrine of vox Dei. You can’t find it because it doesn’t exist.

If the person in charge of liturgy at your place doesn’t like voice of God songs, don’t use them. But it is an issue of personal taste, not church teaching or regulations.

Most of the voice of God songs are taken directly from scripture. For example, “I Am The Bread of Life” is from John 6, and “Here I Am Lord” is from Is 6. Others are directly from the Psalms. They are certainly appropriate for liturgy.

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