Liturgy in LDS

I was wondering are there any resources that discuss the various cermonies and perhaps liturgies of the LDS Church? Do they have any ceremonies similar to a Protestant Lord’s Supper service or Catholic Mass? Is there a set procedure like the Mass with rubrics?

Most of the Liturgical equivalents in the LDS church (lord’s supper, baptism, etc.) are shorter and less complex than those in the RCC.

Section 20 of their Doctrine and Covenants provides what the consider to be the scriptural basis for most of the common ones.

They used to have a section in the back of their priesthood lesson manuals that gave the instructions for perfoming most of what they call priesthood ordinances. (very similar to the RCC definition of sacraments)

They believe in their own versions of : Baptism, Confirmation, Eucharist, Anointing the sick, Matrimony and Holy Orders.

They baptize children of at least 8 years of age and adults by immersion in the name of the Father, Son and holy Ghost. This may be performed by a “priest” (specific office of their lower or "Aaronic"priesthood usually held by teen boys over 16) or any holder of their “melchisadec” or higher priesthood.(most adult male members fit this category) This is commonly done by the Father in the case of children and by missionaries in the case of adult converts.

Confirmation is usaually done the first sunday after baptism and is perfromed by one or more holders of their higher priesthood. This involves the giving of the gift of the Holy Ghost, confiormation of their membership in the Church and usually a personal blessing. Once again it is commonly done by the Father for children and by missionaries for converts. It is performed in the name of Jesus Christ only.

Anointing the sick may be done by any holder of the higher priesthood and has two parts: first is an anointing with blessed oil done in the name of Jesus Christ, second is a “sealing” of the anointing and a personal blessing done in the name of Jesus Christ. This is usually performed by two people together in the home or hospital one of whom is commonly a family member.

They call their lord’s supper equivalent “the Sacrament” and it is done in Church on Sunday during their main worship service. They use water and bread rather than wine and wafers. (although this was not always the case and their scripture says that the items themselves don’t really matter as they are only symbols)

They use very specific prayers over the bread first, which is then carried to the congregation; then the water which is also carried to the congragants. The entire ordinance is usually carried out by their lower priesthood (boys between 12-18). the “priests” (16-18_ give the blessings, the deacons (12-14) distribute the bread and water and the “teachers” (14-16) prepare the altar, bread, water, trays,etc. and put everything away after teh service. The specific prayers come from their scriptures that I referenced above.

Matrimony may be performed as basically a civil ceremony “till death do you part” anywhere outside of their Temples by any “Bishop” (equivalent to a Pastor) and many other Priesthood leaders but is somewhat frowned upon.

True “sacramental” Marriages are performed only in their Temples by “sealers” (a special priest who is called specifically to perform this function within their Temples). This can also be done between children and parents in the case of adoption or convert families. This ceremony is intended to bind the people together as a family “for all eternity”. Couples who are “sealed” in the Temple are automatically sealed to any children born after the “sealing.”

The exact wording (and in this case special vestments) for this ceremony are considered sacred by Mormons and thus they do not discuss it outside of their Temples. ( I can assure you thought that it is nothing “bad” or “shocking” and is in fact rather short and plain in nature).

Holy Orders are referred to as priesthood ordinations in th eLDS church. Young Men initially have the “aaronic” or lesser Priesthood “conferred” upon them by a “Priest” or higher and in the same ordiance are then “called” to the office of a Deacon. Later they are “called” to the office of “Teacher”, and finally “Priest” .

Adult Men have the “melchisadec” or Higher Priesthood “conferred” upon them by an Elder or higher and in the same ordinance are “called” to the office of Elder. (some Men are later “called” to the office of Seventy, High Priest, Apostle, etc.)

All of these Holy Order type ordinances are usually performed at church on Sunday in the name of Jesus Christ. They usually include a brief personal blessing and are commonly performed by a Family Member (father, grandfather, etc) or a priesthood leader in the case of converts. The Various priesthood “offices” have different specific responsibilities. Sometimes a “priesthood holder” will be tasked with a very specific “calling” that requires them to be “set apart”. (bishop, stake president, etc.) this is done in much the same way as the other “callings”.

[quote=majick275]Most of the Liturgical equivalents in the LDS church (lord’s supper, baptism, etc.) are shorter and less complex than those in the RCC.

Section 20 of their Doctrine and Covenants provides what the consider to be the scriptural basis for most of the common ones.

They used to have a section in the back of their priesthood lesson manuals that gave the instructions for perfoming most of what they call priesthood ordinances. (very similar to the RCC definition of sacraments)

They believe in their own versions of : Baptism, Confirmation, Eucharist, Anointing the sick, Matrimony and Holy Orders.

They baptize children of at least 8 years of age and adults by immersion in the name of the Father, Son and holy Ghost. This may be performed by a “priest” (specific office of their lower or "Aaronic"priesthood usually held by teen boys over 16) or any holder of their “melchisadec” or higher priesthood.(most adult male members fit this category) This is commonly done by the Father in the case of children and by missionaries in the case of adult converts.

Confirmation is usaually done the first sunday after baptism and is perfromed by one or more holders of their higher priesthood. This involves the giving of the gift of the Holy Ghost, confiormation of their membership in the Church and usually a personal blessing. Once again it is commonly done by the Father for children and by missionaries for converts. It is performed in the name of Jesus Christ only.

Anointing the sick may be done by any holder of the higher priesthood and has two parts: first is an anointing with blessed oil done in the name of Jesus Christ, second is a “sealing” of the anointing and a personal blessing done in the name of Jesus Christ. This is usually performed by two people together in the home or hospital one of whom is commonly a family member.

They call their lord’s supper equivalent “the Sacrament” and it is done in Church on Sunday during their main worship service. They use water and bread rather than wine and wafers. (although this was not always the case and their scripture says that the items themselves don’t really matter as they are only symbols)

They use very specific prayers over the bread first, which is then carried to the congregation; then the water which is also carried to the congragants. The entire ordinance is usually carried out by their lower priesthood (boys between 12-18). the “priests” (16-18_ give the blessings, the deacons (12-14) distribute the bread and water and the “teachers” (14-16) prepare the altar, bread, water, trays,etc. and put everything away after teh service. The specific prayers come from their scriptures that I referenced above.

Matrimony may be performed as basically a civil ceremony “till death do you part” anywhere outside of their Temples by any “Bishop” (equivalent to a Pastor) and many other Priesthood leaders but is somewhat frowned upon.

True “sacramental” Marriages are performed only in their Temples by “sealers” (a special priest who is called specifically to perform this function within their Temples). This can also be done between children and parents in the case of adoption or convert families. This ceremony is intended to bind the people together as a family “for all eternity”. Couples who are “sealed” in the Temple are automatically sealed to any children born after the “sealing.”

The exact wording (and in this case special vestments) for this ceremony are considered sacred by Mormons and thus they do not discuss it outside of their Temples. ( I can assure you thought that it is nothing “bad” or “shocking” and is in fact rather short and plain in nature).

Holy Orders are referred to as priesthood ordinations in th eLDS church. Young Men initially have the “aaronic” or lesser Priesthood “conferred” upon them by a “Priest” or higher and in the same ordiance are then “called” to the office of a Deacon. Later they are “called” to the office of “Teacher”, and finally “Priest” .

Adult Men have the “melchisadec” or Higher Priesthood “conferred” upon them by an Elder or higher and in the same ordinance are “called” to the office of Elder. (some Men are later “called” to the office of Seventy, High Priest, Apostle, etc.)

All of these Holy Order type ordinances are usually performed at church on Sunday in the name of Jesus Christ. They usually include a brief personal blessing and are commonly performed by a Family Member (father, grandfather, etc) or a priesthood leader in the case of converts. The Various priesthood “offices” have different specific responsibilities. Sometimes a “priesthood holder” will be tasked with a very specific “calling” that requires them to be “set apart”. (bishop, stake president, etc.) this is done in much the same way as the other “callings”.
[/quote]

Thank you for the in depth explanation!

[quote=majick275]Most of the Liturgical equivalents in the LDS church (lord’s supper, baptism, etc.) are shorter and less complex than those in the RCC.
[/quote]

It’s true that most of the ones you listed are shorter, but the one that’s not shorter is also the most common one, that is, the “Sacrament Meeting.” It takes an hour, followed by two hours of instructions if you elect to go to those.

Well, not really.

I mean Mass is an hour. Sacrament meeting is scheduled for an hour (although it usually runs over) Mass is just about all centered around the eucharist. Sacrament meeting gets that out of the way pretty quick so that they can focus on “talks”.

It is the sunday School/primary and “priesthood”/relief society meetings that take up the next two hours.

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