Liturgy of the Hours -- Psalm 95

At the beginning of each day, the Liturgy of the Hours proscribes the singing/recitation of Psalm 95 as a default (alternatives are allowed). I have two questions in this regard:

  1. Must it be said, as the rubric section has it, in stanza/antiphon/stanza/antiphon mode, or may the antiphon just be said at the beginning and end as is allowed for other Psalms and Canticles?

  2. Why is Psalm 95 chosen for this purpose?

Psalm 95 has traditionally been the Invitatory Psalm of the Roman and Monastic Office (I can’t speak for the other Western rites here; I simply don’t know).

I think one reason is the verse “Oh, that today you would hear His voice!”

I don’t know if the present LOH has the entire Psalm or just selected verses.

The English translation of the General Instruction of the Liturgy of the Hours uses the word “preferable” in regard to the format of the Invitatory psalm (antiphon/strophe/antiphon/strophe):

[LEFT]34. The whole office begins as a rule with an invitatory. This consists in the verse, Lord, open my lips. And my mouth will proclaim your praise, and Ps 95. This psalm invites the faithful each day to sing God’s praise and to listen to his voice and draws them to hope for “the Lord’s rest.” [1]
In place of Ps 95, Ps 100, Ps 67, or Ps 24 may be used as circumstances may suggest.
It is preferable to recite the invitatory psalm responsorially as it is set out in the text, that is, with the antiphon recited at the beginning, then repeated, and repeated again after each strophe.
35. The invitatory is placed at the beginning of the whole sequence of the day’s prayer, that is, it precedes either morning prayer or the office of readings, whichever of these liturgical rites begins the day. The invitatory psalm with its antiphon may be omitted, however, when the invitatory is the prelude to morning prayer.
36. The variation of the invitatory antiphon, to suit the different liturgical days, is indicated at its place of occurrence.[/LEFT]

[LEFT]My Emphasis

Just how much weight does “preferable” carry? I’d have to defer to others with more knowlege.[/LEFT]

quote from the previous post above mine

  1. The whole office begins as a rule with an invitatory. This consists in the verse, Lord, open my lips. And my mouth will proclaim your praise, and Ps 95. This psalm invites the faithful each day to sing God’s praise and to listen to his voice and draws them to hope for “the Lord’s rest.” [1]
    In place of Ps 95, Ps 100, Ps 67, or Ps 24 may be used as circumstances may suggest.
    It is preferable to recite the invitatory psalm responsorially as it is set out in the text, that is, with the antiphon recited at the beginning, then repeated, and repeated again after each strophe.
  2. The invitatory is placed at the beginning of the whole sequence of the day’s prayer, that is, it precedes either morning prayer or the office of readings, whichever of these liturgical rites begins the day. The invitatory psalm with its antiphon may be omitted, however, when the invitatory is the prelude to morning prayer.
  3. The variation of the invitatory antiphon, to suit the different liturgical days, is indicated at its place of occurrence.

When I ordered the Liturgy of the Hours 1 Vol. Christian Prayer, it gave me a guide on what is read each day. It also came with a couple inserts that included Psalm 95, 100, 67, 24, Te Deum, Magnificat, Benedictus. The Invitatory Psalms can be 95, 100, 67 or 24 depending if one of those is not being read during the prayers. I wish they would reorganize the Ordinary just a little.

I am NOT trying to be the grammar police here but ‘proscribes’ means ‘forbids’. I think you mean ‘prescribes’. Please excuse me for mentioning it but in the interest of clarity especially for those for whom English is not the first language I bring it up because it might be confusing for them.

I know when I’m reciting with a group we say the antiphon at beginning and end only. I used to say it in between the stanzas when alone because I had somehow gotten the impression with reading on various sites that this was correct, but now I’m not sure. And it is of course easier to do it the ‘same way’ at home that I do ‘outside.’ So now I just say the antiphon at beginning and end.

The other psalms like Ps. 24, Ps. 100, are found either in the 4 week cycle on a regular basis or for various feast days, but I have not (in the One Year LOTH that I use) found Ps. 95 anywhere other than given as the 'introductory psalm so perhaps that is why it is used; because it isn’t really used anywhere else. It makes it easier than trying to remember if this is a date where one of the other psalms is used so you would have to substitute Ps. 95 anyway for the place where the psalm (24, 100, etc.) was since you have already said it (ps. 24, 100, etc.) after the invitatory.

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