Liturgy rules on organ music during Easter Triduum

What are the rules regarding organ music during Easter Triduum? I have heard that there should be no organ from the Gloria in Celebration of the Last Supper until the Gloria during the Easter Vigil.
I am at a differnt parich and am not sure weather I should mention something to those in charge.

God Bless
John

Why not just wait and see, the Triduum doesn’t start until Thursday, and it seems that there would be some hubris to think that those in charge don’t know what they are supposed to do during that time. If they do err, then perhaps mention it after the fact.

Thank you!

I did this quick and should have put more information. My brother (16) is the organist; he was not there last year so he is not sure. There realy is no music director beond him and i help him out.
I know the rule but do now know where it is from and before I talk our priest about it I want more then just "this is what we did in the seminary. If there is some liturgy buff out there i would like to know what he has to say.

God Bless
John

The general rule is from 2002 General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM), n. 313: “In Lent the playing of the organ and musical instruments is allowed only to support the singing. Exceptions are Laetare Sunday (Fourth Sunday of Lent), Solemnities, and Feasts.”

I think there is a confusion between bells and the organ. For the Holy Thursday Mass of the Lord’s Supper (which begins the Triduum) the Roman Missal has: “During the singing of the Gloria the church bells are rung and then reamin silent until the Easter Vigil, unless the conference of bishops or the Ordinary decrees otherwise.” (From The Roman Missal, Catholic Book Publishing Co., New York, 1985, page 135).

[quote=johnjszymanski]Thank you!

I did this quick and should have put more information. My brother (16) is the organist; he was not there last year so he is not sure. There realy is no music director beond him and i help him out.
I know the rule but do now know where it is from and before I talk our priest about it I want more then just "this is what we did in the seminary. If there is some liturgy buff out there i would like to know what he has to say.

God Bless
John
[/quote]

John - My wife has been Organist and Choir Director for many years.
She says the Gloria should be glorious; so do what you need to make it so; though her choir is chanting it this year. The very fact that it is the Gloria takes it outside the Lenten Rules.
Between the Gloria on Thursday and the Gloria on Saturday use the minimum organ needed to support the congregational singing; most congregations won’t make it without some support. The choir may be able to make it without support if the pieces aren’t too long; [and no organ solos :wink: ].

We have a new wonderful Polish priest in our parish. However he insists that Vatican documents say that during the Tridium that there should not be any instruments, only acapella singing. Does anyone having any info supporting this…or refuting this practice in the US?

My biggest pet peeve is the organ accompanying the Tantum Ergo during the transferal of the Eucharist to the Altar of Repose. IMO, it should be a cappella.

You have just resurrected an 8 year old thread. You might want to start a new one because this one will likely be closed. But to answer your question, the 1988 document "Circular Letter Concerning the Preparation and Celebration of the Easter Feasts" from the Congregation for Divine Worship has this to say about the celebration of the Lord’s Supper on Holy Thursday:

  1. During the singing of the hymn “Gloria in excelsis” In accordance with local custom, the bells may be rung, and should thereafter remain silent until the “Gloria in excelsis” of the Easter Vigil, unless the conference of bishops or the local ordinary, for a suitable reason, has decided otherwise. (56) During this same period the organ and other musical instruments may be used only for the purpose of supporting the singing. (57)
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