logic and math

Is math analogous to logic?

Is math analogous to fine arts?

Do syllogisms pass out of existence if human beings pass out of existence?

What kind of ontological existence does math have?

Are we able to discern the noumena of the physical laws?

What kind of ontological existence do the physical laws have?

Can math be measure, weighed, and counted?

Should science use math if it cannot be measured or weighed?

THANKS!!!

Most of math can be derived from a deductive system called ZFC set theory. The theory is classical logic equipped with the notion of sets and the axiom of choice. So the jump from logic to math requires us to propose sets and a few extra axioms that describe the behavior of sets.

Is math analogous to fine arts?

I would say not.

Do syllogisms pass out of existence if human beings pass out of existence?

What does it mean to say that an idea exists? Questions like this are a semantical nightmare. Thankfully, we don’t need to discuss the existence of logical arguments for logic to be useful.

Can math be measure, weighed, and counted?

I personally doubt that the Pythagorean Theorem weighs 200 pounds after all that exercise and dieting it’s been through.

Should science use math if it cannot be measured or weighed?

Let’s put it this way: If there comes a day when math is not applicable to science, scientific advancement will end. Look at Aristotelian physics for an example of what happens when science fails to describe phenomena quantitatively.

To the best we can determine (working from human minds resident in death-bound heads), math seems to be the language physical science is written in.

Occasionally, new discoveries in the physical world lead to advancement of our knowledge in math, such as the introduction of calculus, number theory, combinatorics, etc.

ICXC NIKA

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foundation_of_mathematics

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacred_geometry

Lots of interesting questions! While I don’t think the language of logic and mathematics would exist without people to express them in formulas, I do think logic and mathematics would still exist. That makes me a realist of sorts with respect to abstract objects (although I actually adopt a combination of realism and conceptualism). One reason to think they exist is due to their indispensability.

Non-existent things do not possess any instantiated attributes, e.g. a unicorn’s being a magical horse with a horn has no instantiation. Logic and mathematics, on the other hand, do possess the instantiated property of indispensability. At least, that’s how I view it.

Thanks!

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