Longest Mass you've attended

How long was the longest Mass you’ve ever attended?

For me it was the Paschal Vigil Mass in the Ordinary Form at my parish last year, lasting for about 2 hours 35 minutes. But I think there are still some longer Masses out there, since Pontifical High Mass in the Extraordinary Form might last more than 3 hours.

Ordination masses are kinda long…but hands down, I would say, has to be the Easter Vigil.

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Our Easter Vigil lasts 3 hours every year. And that’s without any baptisms. The entire Vigil is chanted.

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I have never timed a Mass I’ve been to. Obviously, I do have a vague idea how long it lasts. Normally Mass on Sunday is about an hour so you’d notice anything significantly longer. I’d guess that it’s the Paschal Vigil Mass on Holy Saturday night. I’ve never been to an ordination but I’ve watched several on TV. I think the paschal Vigil is probably a little longer.

Easter Vigil which was about 3 and a half hours last year.

Yes, Easter Vigil and Ordination Masses are right up there. But I think in this area they might be eked out by the Chrism Mass with the several processions, the renewal of priests’ vows, the choreography of getting the couple of hundred priests onto the altar – Always 3+ hours in my experience.

I’ve also been to papal Masses twice. I wasn’t watching the clock, but I’d bet they were up there. :clock1: :eyes:

I would say Ordination Mass however I never timed it. It was truly wonderful and the priest laying postrate as the litany of saints was chanted

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Like others who responded before me I don’t time the Masses I attend, but I recall at least one presbyteral Ordination Mass that lasted well over three and a half hours.

This Archdiocese’s Chrism Masses tend to run about three hours. The length of the Easter Vigil here varies somewhat, with the shortest I’ve attended going just under two hours and the longest a little more than three.

I think the longer the mass the better to glorify god

I attended an Easter Vigil that was at least three hours long, and I had to get there four hours early just to get a good seat.

I’ve also been to an Eastern Orthodox Hierarchical Divine Liturgy with Met. Jonah of the OCA. It was at least two hours long.

Archbishop Joseph Raya - a (late) Melkite Greek Catholic bishop - once said that a properly done Divine Liturgy should be at least 1.5 hours. I completely agree with him and think his statement holds true for every Rite.

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Easter Vigil

I attended the abbey consecration of the Benedictines of Mary Queen of Apostles, followed by a Pontifical High Mass at the faldstool. Both of those together lasted seven hours.

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Not sure which was longer, nor exactly how long they were, but an ordination Mass in New York and a Mass with Pope St. John Paul II and a couple hundred thousand of our closest friends had to rank up there.

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My brother-in-law was ordained to the priesthood on Jan 3, 1991 by Pope John Paul II in St. Peter’s Basilica along with 49 other seminarians.

It was at least a 3-hour long Mass, said in Latin, English, Spanish, Italian, and French…

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I’ve been to an Easter Vigil, my cousin’s Ordination, and a Latin Mass.

The longest was the Easter Vigil by far…

Consecration of our FSSP parish church was a five-hour Mass.

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Easter Vigil with all the readings, 4 hours long.

I hope we as Catholics realize how horribly spoiled we are, as regards the length of Mass. Your typical Sunday Mass, whether OF or EF, typically runs something like an hour and 10 minutes at the very least. That is not a long church service at all. Daily Mass, without music (except perhaps for a couple of a cappella verses sung by the congregation), can be over in a half-hour easily. Most Christian denominations have much longer services. In some more fundamentalist denominations, as well as African American churches, there is more than one service, and it’s pretty much an all-day commitment. Can you imagine how Catholics, in the main, would react if they were expected to go to Mass on Sunday morning, then return later on that evening for another liturgy and sermon? There is also Sunday School to consider, which has no direct Catholic equivalent (CCD is “kinda-sorta” Sunday School, and some parishes have Bible study, but the latter is not common).

Catholic requirements for divine worship are very lenient. As I tell my family, God gives you 168 hours per week, the least you can do, is to give Him back one of those hours (really, two hours, by the time you drive there and back, get parked, visit with fellow parishioners on the way out, and so on). And keep in mind, that Mass is not a “social event” — we do not go there to see other people, nor to “fellowship” with them (that’s a noun, not a verb, but I’m just following common usage) unless we just want to, and extended conversations before Mass are just not a “Catholic thing”. It took me quite a while to comprehend why Catholics seemed rather aloof and taciturn before Mass — in all honesty, I thought they were just being jerks! This was when I was a teenager and the Catholic world was totally new to me.

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I think it’s a tie between Easter Vigil and Chrism Mass for me (and Holy Thursday comes in a close second as well). EV & CM at just over 3 hours, and HT at 2 to 2.5-ish.

We’ve had some other lengthy liturgies - new bishop, new pastor, dedication of a new church, canonization celebration (obviously our local one, not THE liturgy in Rome), etc. but those all generally stayed under 2 hours if I recall.

We also celebrated the Year 2000 Jubilee with an Archdiocesan-wide Mass in a stadium that incorporated all of the (non-convert) confirmations for the year, marriage vow renewals, etc. with all the clergy and neighboring bishops from multiple states concelebrating. I can’t remember now how long that lasted — it very well could have been the record.

Lucky! I watch part of it online.

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