Looking for a good Catholic bible study tools

Hi,

I’m looking for good Catholic bible study guides / resources / helps / aids. I read the New American Bible, have the Navarre study bible for Joshua thru Kings, and am following along on the Great Adventure by Jeff Cavins. I’m looking for a guide that will give an outline or main points for each book of the bible. Any ideas?

Thanks,

Please visit my humble website, linked below. It’ll help you get started.:slight_smile:

the Catholic Study Bible is invaluable. Also, try www.catholichomestudy.org. They have a series of FREE books with quizzes that can be mailed in or answered online.

check out the study guides by Nicholas King.

www.101Bible.com is a free Bible study site. You can read a variety of versions for the Bible and there is a quick and easy Dictionary definition for all places,names and words in the Bible.

The following may be helpful for seminary students, religious professor/faculty- teachers, any Catholic students taking religious education classes, and also may be of use in helping priests prepare sermons for Gospels readings of the day using Catholic commentaries, and church Fathers quotes, religious Education Directors and CCD Teachers, and of course it may be useful for any Catholic in learning more about their faith, Scripture etc… Please be sure to pass this along.

A great Catholic Bible and Catechetical Downloadable Study Software Program, and best of all its Free. From: esnips.com/web/CatholicApolegetics
These are all eSword modules-Bibles, Commentaries, Dictionaries, and Topical all for the eSword base Bible software program… All to help Catholics and those interested in knowing more or understanding what the Catholic Church truly teaches and why. All modules are free as well as the Base esword program for download.

The Base progam is a free download at: e-sword.net/downloads.html .

Rick Myers e-sword site states: e-Sword is a fast and effective way to study the Bible. E-Sword is feature rich and user friendly with more capabilities than you would expect in a free software package. The fact that e-Sword is free is just one of the blessings and does not speak of the quality of the software. I make my living writing software and I believe I have put forth my best effort in this endeavor. The real work, however, was put in by the godly men and women who devoted countless years creating the texts that have been made available for our benefit. (From the e-sword Web site Rick Myers)

The Program has the ability to accept user created modules hence a substantial number of user Catholic modules including the Early Teachings of the Church in the first few centuries (a must read), Haydock Commentary, The Great Cornelius Lapide commentary, A Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture, **St Thomas works in the Catena commentary **on Gospels by early church fathers, and his Summa Theologica, The Douay Rheims Catholic Bible plus two other Bible resources, Catechism, 1909 Catholic encyclopedia another must, The 1910 Catholic Dictionary, a Catholic Doctrinal Concordance, How Protestants Study the Bible versus how Catholics study the Bible, and a number of special tools for studying the Bible With Greek and Latin tools for studying the basic Greek Grammer to enhance one’s understanding of definitions etc. This has become a consolidation of free modules for e-Sword base progam, modules scattered across ensips web, and a few other websites on the internet all to make for easier download and finding of Catholic modules and good study tools. Michael Jacques

A Free Greek English-Hebrew English interlinear Bible which is better than the interlinear for e-Sword is available at scripture4all.org/

We need to put word out to our churches, Bible study coordinators, Religious Educators, students, seminarians, for priests material here to help with sermons. etc–of what is available here at their fingertips. Those who are studying and making use of this need to consider now or down line for getting involved in Catholic Religious Ed. This is a work in progress so come on back and see whats new.

I have added some Compiled HTM Linked files for those who have trouble navigating the eSword,small Catholic Bible Study, and Church fathers.

For info on how to make eSword compatible with Mac, and Linaux users : davidcox.com.mx/e-swordmodules/Esword_MAC.htm Linaux made compatible using wine program winehq.org

"This is dedicated to all the cradle Catholics, like myself, who one day woke up and realized they didn’t know anything about Catholicism. "
Hoping to add some good recent Catholic commentary which would be great editions at a $ Cost.
Michael Jacques

There is an excellent book called The Catholic Study Bible–New American Bible, General Editor, Donald Senior, Associate Editors. John Collins, Mary Ann Getty, and Carroll Stuhlmueller.


The Carholic Study Bible combines the full text, introductions, and notes on the New American Bible with more than 600 pages of completely new study methods and materials written by many of the finest Catholic scholars in the field. The study materials include: Reading Guides that explain the structure and meaning of every book in the Bible; extensive reference articles on key issues in the Bible study, including a comprehensive overview of the Bible’s role in Catholic life; an outline of biblical history; a detailed introduction to the first 5 books of the OT; a full explanation of the Bible’s role in Catholic liyutgy, etc. I would highly recommend that you attain a copy of this Bible Study.


I have a copy of it and what is so unique are the Study Guides. Prior to reading, say the first chapter of Mark, the Study Guide will go into detail and explain what you are going about to read. It will help you a great deal.


I hope you get a copy of it. Good luck!

consider the Haydock Bible Commentary. I have got a lot out of it. because many things. May not be study material but it gives direction for study material.

After much of the same searching, I’ve found on paper nothing better than the Catechism for Scripture Study as a Catholic. If its doesnt have an imprimatur, I cant take it 100% seriously.

I spend more time in the car daily than I can ever find to read, so I have an ipod full of CAL shows and Hahn commentaries as well as Grodi Deep in Scripture podcasts…thats where most of my light is revealed actually. I then follow up in reading.

If you’re studying John’s Gospel, the Steve Ray study is outstanding. It’s in tremendous depth, provides historical and theological instruction, and references to the CCC, the Church Fathers, and the Old and New Testament. It’s outstanding. In my study we use this, Barclays, and the Hahn Ignatius study, and this one is the best by a long shot.

http://www.catholic-convert.com/Portals/0/book_john_01.jpg

catholic-convert.com/Default.aspx?tabid=101

My favorite is Orchard’s “A Catholic Commentary on Catholic Scripture,” but its out of print and hard/expensive to get. Like another poster, I have the Haydock Douay Rheims bible, and it is awesome…even if you just use the commentary with other bible versions. There is also an online version here: haydock1859.tripod.com/index.html

I also have two of the books recommended by Catholic Answers here: catholic.com/library/scripture_tradition.asp

I have “A Guide to the Bible” and “Inside the Bible.” They are both good and written from a traditionally Catholic perspective. The only thing is they are pretty high level. But they might be what you’re looking for.

rocketrob

Inside the Bible by Kenneth Baker is good. It is published by Ignatius.

Also if you start by reading the 14 historical books in chronological order it will help give an overview of the whole story. The other books fall into time periods that are dominated by the stories in these books. In order they are as follows:

  1. Genesis
  2. Exodus
  3. Numbers
  4. Joshua
  5. Judges
  6. 1 Samuel
  7. 2 Samuel
  8. 1 Kings
  9. 2 Kings
  10. Ezra
  11. Nehemia
  12. 1 Maccabees
  13. Luke
  14. Acts

Reading these books in order first will give you the essential story as they are really like the Spine of the Bible. All the other books can be read as contemporaries of these books in their different time periods. The exception to this seems to be the Gospels, of which the first three are synoptic, and John is very different.

[quote=mijac;] All modules are free as well as the Base esword program for download.
[/quote]

Minor correction. Some resources are not gratis. (RSV-CE, NRSVA, to give two examples of Catholic resources.) (For those who like splitting hairs, I’ll concede in advance that the NRSVA and NRSV-CE are two different texts.)

The Program has the ability to accept user created modules hence a substantial number of user Catholic modules including…

If somebody starts now, Readings for the Daily Office (2009), and Readings for the Lectionary (2009) can be constructed as a devotional module, before 1 Jan 2009.

FWIW, I’m working on transcribing some of the ancient lectionary lists to e-Sword format.

xan

jonathon

I’d say it all depends on how in-depth you want to be.

I’d recommend “You can Understand the Bible” by Peter Kreeft as the best summary book of the Bible.

The Ignatius Study Bible’s; while they are a work in progress, most of the NT is done at this time. Besides you can’t go wrong with something that Scott Hahn has had his hands in.

If you a looking to go even deeper. Commentaries are the way to go, and the more the merrier. The Collegeville commentary is good as a contemporary resource. I would also recommend looking for commentaries by Fr. William G. Most.

For more older resources, try and find the “Golden Chain” (CatenaAurea) by Thomas Aquinas in which he compiled the commentaries on scripture that the Church Father’s gave. On the same note, John Chrsysostom’s commentaries are excellent.

And if all that doesn’t satisfy you, try learning Greek or Hebrew. That will really help with insight and understanding of Scripture. A long but very rewarding process.

I have some great tools on my site.

Just so you know both the Haydock Commentary and Orchard’s “A Catholic Commentary on Catholic Scripture” are both built into the eSword Catholic Bible and Catechetical study program made note of earlier:

A great Catholic Bible and Catechetical Downloadable Study Software Program, and best of all its Free. From: esnips.com/web/CatholicApolegetics
These are all eSword modules-Bibles, Commentaries, Dictionaries, and Topical all for the eSword base Bible software program… All to help Catholics and those interested in knowing more or understanding what the Catholic Church truly teaches and why. All modules are free as well as the Base esword program for download.

The Program has the ability to accept user created modules hence a substantial number of user Catholic modules including the Early Teachings of the Church in the first few centuries (a must read),** Haydock Commentary, The Great Cornelius Lapide commentary, A Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture, St Thomas works in the Catena commentary **on Gospels by early church fathers, and his Summa Theologica, The Douay Rheims Catholic Bible plus two other Bible resources, Catechism, 1909 Catholic encyclopedia another must, The 1910 Catholic Dictionary, a Catholic Doctrinal Concordance, How Protestants Study the Bible versus how Catholics study the Bible, and a number of special tools for studying the Bible With Greek and Latin tools for studying the basic Greek Grammer to enhance one’s understanding of definitions etc. This has become a consolidation of free modules for e-Sword base progam, modules scattered across ensips web, and a few other websites on the internet all to make for easier download and finding of Catholic modules and good study tools. Michael Jacques

Well that’s good to know. I have to admit that I don’t know much about this eSword program…sounds like I better check it out.

rocketrob

The Esword program and modules look great. I’ve downloaded the esword program, but for the life of me, I can’t open the various modules that I downloaded. I’ve read all the directions. Can anyone help?

Aisha

You went to the eswrd site and downloaded the program right?
You installed the program on your harddrive right?
most all of the modules on the esnips site are zipped, they must be unzziped with a zip program such as winzip, and extracted, the files need to be extracted and copied/ pasted into the esword folder which is under the program files folder on the harddrive, then they should all automatically load into the esord progam when it is opened.

Thanks, I’ll try that!! :slight_smile:

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