LOTH question


#1

If I am at a public computer during the day and I read the online LOTH in silence, does that "count?" Or is it better to read it aloud at home?


#2

[quote="SecretaryMonday, post:1, topic:340877"]
If I am at a public computer during the day and I read the online LOTH in silence, does that "count?" Or is it better to read it aloud at home?

[/quote]

as long as you do the prayer the way the Church calls you to do it (aka say the black do the red) you are fine. I would suggest doing it using the book that it comes from but there is nothing wrong with saying it online or using your phone if you don't have access to the breviary.

nothing wrong with praying them in silence as long as you do it reverently and don't speed through it


#3

It's perfectly acceptable. I do the same thing for the minor hours 3x a week when I work from the office; at home I chant the hours except often Compline when I'm too tired and read it from bed :p (though I do try to chant Compline at least a couple of times during the work week, and always on Sundays).


#4

Although I should add that at work I do use my breviary. I'm old-fashioned and prefer a book in hand for the LOTH. However if using a site using approved texts, it's the same words, the same prayer, and perfectly licit, in fact I think even the Vatican has a mobile app version!


#5

As others have said, it is perfecly licit. I do the same myself. The Church would rather us join in her liturgical prayer in some fashion rather than not at all. That being said, if possible, I think the following would be the order of preference from a liturgical ideal standpoint (just my personal opinions):

1) Chanted as a congregation in a church led by a priest or deacon

2) Read by a priest or deacon in a church with a congregation

2) Chanted as a congregation in a church without a priest or deacon

3) Read in a church by a lay leader with a congregation

4) Chanted privately at home

5) Read out loud privately at home

6) Read silently

But any of the above is a true participation in the liturgical life of the Church.


#6

[quote="twf, post:5, topic:340877"]
As others have said, it is perfecly licit. I do the same myself. The Church would rather us join in her liturgical prayer in some fashion rather than not at all. That being said, if possible, I think the following would be the order of preference from a liturgical ideal standpoint (just my personal opinions):

1) Chanted as a congregation in a church led by a priest or deacon

2) Read by a priest or deacon in a church with a congregation

2) Chanted as a congregation in a church without a priest or deacon

3) Read in a church by a lay leader with a congregation

4) Chanted privately at home

5) Read out loud privately at home

6) Read silently

But any of the above is a true participation in the liturgical life of the Church.

[/quote]

Prayer is prayer, period. God does not have a rating system, period.


#7

[quote="coachdennis, post:6, topic:340877"]
Prayer is prayer, period. God does not have a rating system, period.

[/quote]

But I liked the rating system. :D

Thank you, everyone.


#8

The Church does in fact have preferences for the LOTH:

  1. Wherever possible, other groups of the faithful should celebrate the liturgy of the hours communally in church. This especially applies to parishes - the cells of the diocese, established under their pastors, taking the place of the bishop; they “represent in some degree the visible Church established throughout the world.” [94]
  1. Hence, when the people are invited to the liturgy of the hours and come together in unity of heart and voice, they show forth the Church in its celebration of the mystery of Christ. [95]
  1. Those in holy orders or with a special canonical mission [96] have the responsibility of initiating and directing the prayer of the community; “they should expend every effort so that those entrusted to their care may become of one mind in prayer.” [97] They must therefore see to it that the people are invited, and prepared by suitable instruction, to celebrate the principal hours in common, especially on Sundays and holydays. [98] They should teach the people how to make this participation a source of genuine prayer; [99] they should therefore give the people suitable guidance in the Christian understanding of the psalms, in order to progress by degrees to a greater appreciation and more frequent use of the prayer of the Church. [100]
  1. Communities of canons, monks, nuns, and other religious who celebrate the liturgy of the hours by rule or according to their constitutions, whether with the general rite or a particular rite, in whole or in part, represent in a special way the Church at prayer. They are a fuller sign of the Church as it continuously praises God with one voice and they fulfill the duty of “working,” above all by prayer, “to build up and increase the whole Mystical Body of Christ, and for the good of the local Churches.” [101] This is especially true of those living the contemplative life.
  1. Even when having no obligation to communal celebration, all sacred ministers and all clerics living in a community or meeting together should arrange to say at least some part of the liturgy of the hours in common, particularly morning prayer and evening prayer. [102]
  1. Men and women religious not bound to a common celebration, as well as members of any institute of perfection, are strongly urged to gather together, by themselves or with the people, to celebrate the liturgy of the hours or part of it.

(General Instructions)

Clearly there is a preference for community prayer when possible, and there’s a special obligation for religious.

That’s not to say solo prayer of the LOTH is undesirable… for most of us there’s little choice most of the time. But it is a communal and public prayer and it’s preferable to pray it in community where possible.

Then there’s chanting. Who was it that said that singing a prayer was like praying it twice? :wink:


#9

[quote="coachdennis, post:6, topic:340877"]
Prayer is prayer, period. God does not have a rating system, period.

[/quote]

This is not what the Church teaches. The Liturgy of the Hours is not simply a private devotion or personal prayer...it is a participation in the liturgy, the official prayer of the Church herself. While the Church, in her mercy, allows us to participate in her liturgy even through a silent, private reading of the LOTH, congregational chanting the office in a church best reflects what the liturgy is - the communal prayer of the people of God offered through our high priest, Jesus Christ, to God the Father, as an extension of the one perfect sacrifice of the eucharistic offered at each holy mass. Privately praying the Liturgy of the Hours is very commendable and beneficial - that is how I normally participate in this great prayer of the Church - but it is not liturgically ideal.
The following quotations are taken from the Church's General Instruction of the Liturgy of the Hours, Chapter I:

The Church is a community, and it must express its nature as a community in its prayer as well as in other ways. Hence, when the community of the faithful is first mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles, it is seen as a community gathered together at prayer...
Though prayer in one's room behind closed doors is always necessary and to be encouraged and is performed by members of the Church through Christ in the Holy Spirit, yet there is a special excellence in the prayer of the community. Christ himself said: "Where two or three are gathered together in my name, I am there in their midst" (Matthew 18:20).
...This prayer is "the voice of the bride herself as she addresses the bridegroom; indeed, it is also the prayer of Christ and his body to the Father."
...The Liturgy of the Hours, like other liturgical actions, is not something private but belongs to the whole body of the Church...Its relation to the Church is most clearly seen when it is celebrated by a local Church in the presence of its bishop in the company of his priests and ministers...Such a celebration is tehrefore most highly recommended.
...Where possible, the principal Hours should be celebrated communally in church by other groups of the faithful.
...Hence, whenever it is possible to haev a celebration in common, with the faithful present and actively sharing in it, thsi kind of celebration is to be preferred to one that is individual and as it were private. [size=]It is also preferable to sing the Office in choir and in community as opportunity offers.../[/size]B] (emphasis added)
The full text of the General Instruction may be read here: ewtn.com/library/curia/cdwgilh.htm


#10

As others have said, praying the LOTH online in silence "counts" and if you can pray silently, I envy you.

For me, if I don't pray aloud, then my prayers are still just thoughts, and my head is already full of thoughts.

It's like pouring milk into a bucket of water. The prayer is lost in no time, and other thoughts take over. My eyes are still traveling over the words, but my mind is wandering.


#11

[quote="Russ_of_Tokyo, post:10, topic:340877"]
As others have said, praying the LOTH online in silence "counts" and if you can pray silently, I envy you.

For me, if I don't pray aloud, then my prayers are still just thoughts, and my head is already full of thoughts.

It's like pouring milk into a bucket of water. The prayer is lost in no time, and other thoughts take over. My eyes are still traveling over the words, but my mind is wandering.

[/quote]

:thumbsup: My preference is out loud at home.


#12

Interesting question. I have a vague memory of someone telling me that one should at least move one's lips, even if no one can hear, like when you're a train.


#13

[quote="SecretaryMonday, post:1, topic:340877"]
If I am at a public computer during the day and I read the online LOTH in silence, does that "count?" Or is it better to read it aloud at home?

[/quote]

For accuracy & clarity...I have to disagree with most every post here that says LOTH can be prayed in silence. Not so!

Pray the LOTH in silence if you like...but the General Instruction ( found in the beginning of Volume I of the four volume set/version) clearly directs that the LOTH to be prayed be a recitation of the prayers...even when alone...because you are always in communion with the Universal Church when celebrating an official (public) Liturgy of the Church.

The GENERAL INSTRUCTION OF THE LITURGY OF THE HOURS by Congregation for Divine Worship uses the word "recited"...this means verbally saying the prayers. Do a word search for "recited"...and you will get the dozen or so precise paragraphs/sentences.

Here is a link for the GENERAL INSTRUCTION OF THE LITURGY OF THE HOURS

ewtn.com/library/curia/cdwgilh.htm#Ch I-IV

Here is a definition for "Recite":

MERRIAM-WEBSTER DICTIONARY
re·cite verb \ri-ˈsīt\
: to read (something) out loud or *say *(something) from memory usually for an audience

: to say or describe (a series or list of things)

merriam-webster.com/dictionary/recite

Here is an example from the General Instruction

[quote]Chapter II-I. Introduction to the Whole Office

  1. The whole office begins as a rule with an invitatory. This consists in the verse, Lord, open my lips. And my mouth will proclaim your praise, and Ps 95. This psalm invites the faithful each day to sing God's praise and to listen to his voice and draws them to hope for "the Lord's rest." [1]

In place of Ps 95, Ps 100, Ps 67, or Ps 24 may be used as circumstances may suggest.

It is preferable to** recite** the invitatory psalm responsorially as it is set out in the text, that is, with the antiphon recited at the beginning, then repeated, and repeated again after each strophe.

Bottom line:...pray by reciting...even if it is a whisper. Its not really an insurmountable problem...if you get any questions...use it to catechize or evangelize.
For your consideration.
Pax Christi
[/quote]


#14

[quote="Lancer, post:13, topic:340877"]
Its not really an insurmountable problem.

[/quote]

It can be for all those who cannot speak. I don't think word searches and dictionaries count as part of the magisterium of the Church, and that is the weak link in your argument.


#15

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