LOTH to Roman Breviary Advice


#1

Hi,

I used a wind fall to purchase the Baronius Press Roman Breviary as I have been attending Tridentne Mass and very much like the traditional Liturgy. Also Baronius Press is strongly suggesting that there may not be another printing so it felt like now is the time.

I have been praying the LOTH for ~7 years and often pray 3 day time prayers so am used to a bit more than “normal”.

I understand Matins is a demanding one.

Some advice I found online suggested easing in to it but that was unclear as to how.

I found an app that has the readings as well so I should be able to check myself.

I am very excited to delve into a more traditional form of prayer.

Any advice….

Thanks,

El Paso


#2

I eased myself into the LOTH many years ago, starting only with Night Prayer (because it short, simple, and repeats on a 7-day cycle). I then added Morning and Evening Prayer on a daily basis for Lent, and from there it was a short matter to just toss in Office of Readings and one of the daytime prayers.

So you might consider starting just with Lauds and Vespers on a daily basis. See how it fits. Then throw in Compline and one of the daytime hours. Then Prime. Then Matins (and remember, you can anticipate Matins from 2 PM the day before).


#3

Well in my opinion the older Roman Breviary is not very traditional; it only dates back to 1910 and at that time introduced many non-traditional innovations that were plenty controversial back then too. For traditional you want the Monastic Breviary which exists in pre- and post-conciliar forms and dates back 1500 years in its basic schema.

That said, it is more fleshed out than the LOTH and will have more traditional language (Latin) and a basic layout that’s a bit closer to the Monastic than the current LOTH (mostly, the placement of the hymn for Lauds and Vespers). And the liturgical year will of course mesh better with the Tridentine Mass that you attend. And most important, it’s a licit option.

What I do to “traditionalize” the modern LOTH is to do it in Latin and with Gregorian chant. I chant first in Latin then read the psalm silently in the vernacular. That does help fatten the Office a bit and keep a connection with tradition (chant; though even that is fairly recent, Gregorian chant as we currently interpret it dates back to the late 19th century but it is based on ancient manuscripts). Since I can only attend an OF Mass in my area the LOTH makes more sense (or when I have more time the monastic schema of the abbey I’m associated with), because of the liturgical year. That OF Mass btw is in Gregorian chant, so I feel blessed :slight_smile:


#4

Thanks,

I’m not trying to be too “traditional”, I just want to be more in sync with the TLM Mass.

I also recall when attending Vespers at a Benedictine Abbey it was different than the LOTH, similar but different. Mostly English but quite a bit of Latin as well. Five Psalms as compared to three as well.

My copy arrives today! I imagine it will have a learning curve.

Since I am under no obligation to pray any offices I suppose I could ease into it by combining with the LOTH until comfortable or used to time allotments etc…

Any advice appreciated,

El Paso


#5

I’d start with Compline, then move on to incorporate Lauds and then Vespers, then I’d incorporate one of the daytime hours as is best for your schedule (Prime, Terce, Sext, or None, adding other day hours as best you can. I’d honestly leave Matins until you’re comfortable with all the others. If you wanted to tackle Matins, I’d start with only doing it on Sundays.


#6

Thanks,

It arrived today and I have been going through it.

Looks a little tricky….

I wonder if there is a page reference such as the St. Joseph’s for the LOTH.

Thanks again,

El Paso


#7

That’s an understatement! I have a pre-conciliar monastic breviary at home, and it’s just about as complex as the Roman. Monks joke that when they finally master the breviary, they’re ready for solemn profession. It takes 3 years to reach solemn profession! :stuck_out_tongue:


#8

Wow!

Only three years…:smiley:

I think I am making a little progress. As suggested start with Compline and I think I can see how that works. Looks like a basic 1 week cycle as the LOTH that does not vary much is at all.

The real trick is trying to determine I am in fact doing it correctly! I learned much of the LOTH on my own and a friend polished my approach.

So far I like the depth and harmony of the RB as opposed to the LOTH. The Baronius Press version has nice meditations of the day to remind you what the days prayers will focus on. I knew this from the LOTH but often forgot.

What I don’t like as much so far is the lack of readings from the saint of the day or Dr’s of the Church on ferial days. I see Sundays and other higher class days has more to it. I had gathered from other reviews that as a whole the RB has more lectures than I am finding on the out set.

So far I like it.

Thanks,

EP


#9

The monastic LOTH (the traditional schema, both pre- and post-conciliar), uses the same three psalms for Compline every night (4, 90 and 133). There is also no responsory or Gospel canticle (Nunc Dimittis), but just a verse and response after the reading. The psalms are also chanted directly, without antiphon.

This was built this way so that Compline could be chanted from memory in the dark. I was visiting a monastery in France 4 years ago that did this. It’s very moving.

Some people don’t know this but there’s an option written in the General Instructions of the current LOTH that allows the use of the Sunday psalms (4, 90 and 133, the first and last being normally used on Saturday evening, the latter Sunday itself) every day of the week, so that Compline may be said from memory.

The interesting thing is that the Compline psalms for weekdays are all repeated elsewhere in the psalter, so that if you use this option, you don’t miss out on any psalms.

It is my preferred option when using the LOTH though I’ll confess I don’t have all the psalms memorized yet, though I do know the hymn, Nunc Dimittis (at least in French) and the responsory from memory, as well as all the Marian antiphons. Maybe before I croak I’ll know it all by heart if dementia doesn’t set in first :stuck_out_tongue:


#10

The monastic LOTH (the traditional schema, both pre- and post-conciliar), uses the same three psalms for Compline every night (4, 90 and 133). There is also no responsory or Gospel canticle (Nunc Dimittis), but just a verse and response after the reading. The psalms are also chanted directly, without antiphon.

This was built this way so that Compline could be chanted from memory in the dark. I was visiting a monastery in France 4 years ago that did this. It’s very moving.

Some people don’t know this but there’s an option written in the General Instructions of the current LOTH that allows the use of the Sunday psalms (4, 90 and 133, the first and last being normally used on Saturday evening, the latter Sunday itself) every day of the week, so that Compline may be said from memory.

The interesting thing is that the Compline psalms for weekdays are all repeated elsewhere in the psalter, so that if you use this option, you don’t miss out on any psalms.

It is my preferred option when using the LOTH though I’ll confess I don’t have all the psalms memorized yet, though I do know the hymn, Nunc Dimittis (at least in French) and the responsory from memory, as well as all the Marian antiphons. Maybe before I croak I’ll know it all by heart if dementia doesn’t set in first :stuck_out_tongue:


#11

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