Loving God in a Divided Church


#1

Hi,

I am new and a convert to protestantism. I will admit that I did not know much about the church when I left. But here are my reasons for leaving.

I had spent my whole life in the church, and attended several different parishes, but I had never experienced God in a significant way. Although I went to catholic elementary school, but I didn’t have a good understanding of catholic theology.

At some point when I was studying for confirmation and doubting there was a God, I had a real encounter with God and I was absolutely enthused about Him. I became extremely dedicated to the church and tried very hard to learn more and be an active participant, but I also started reading the bible— something I had never seen any catholics do in my life. Perhaps, had there been catholics teaching me how to enterpret the bible, I would not have left the church, but whenever I would take a question I had about scripture to someone in the church, like my pastor, he seem to want to brush scripture aside.

As time went on, I began to believe that there was no scriptural justification for sacraments other than baptism and communion, and possibly confession. I also no longer believed in the authority of the Pope. When I read the book of ACTS, it doesn’t seem at all evident that Peter thought he was in charge of everyone. There seemed to have been to be a collaborative spirit among the apostles as the Holy Spirit revealed the various gifts of people and called them to serve.

I began to believe that the churches attention to Mary was misguided.

I also felt like the catholic church placed unnecessarily burdens on believers, like the policy on birth control and the celibate priesthood.

And then I began to believe in the priesthood of believers. I came to believe all these things independently as I read scripture. There were no fundmaentalist Christians wooing me.

However, none of these disagreements are ultimately why I left the church. I would have never called it so at the time because I was raised Catholic, but after I had my born again experience I was so full of love and joy, I felt like I was about to burst, but I couldn’t find anyone around me who were equally passionate. It disturbed me to watch people going through the motions with no love for God, picking and choosing what to practice, and this was pervasive. So, ultimately, I left the church because I thought people were dead inside. I heard all this talk about the Holy Spirit, but I didn’t really experience it until I was outside of the RCC (and no, I don’t mean jumping up and down like a fool). My parents were so moved by my passion for God that they converted too.

Now, I realize that not every catholic is nonchalantly going through the religious motions. I know that many of you have deep and genuine love for Jesus, but in all honesty, my experience, having grown up in a predominantly catholic country, is that such enthusiasm is rare in the RCC. Obviously, this is not scientific conclusion, but ten years ago, it was an obsevation that both baffled me and broke my heart.

I now attend a Vineyard Church and let me say upfront, I do not believe that the Vineyard Church interprets scripture accurately all the time. In fact, having gone to several churches, I have basically had to conclude that most if not all churches are wrong about something. I attend this church because I have never met a group of people who so desperately want to serve God and love their neighbor.

Interestingly, there are two catholic theology students who attend our church. I thought this was odd, and I have asked them about it since these men are studying in the RCC, but attend our church instead of the catholic church down the street. Apparently, they do this for the same reason I left the church, they feel like people just go through the religious motions and were not passionated about Jesus.

I am sorry to be so long-winded, but a few more things. I, too, I am deeply burdened by the division in the church, and get angry when there some non-demoninational minster preaching a prosperity gospel with no one to hold him accountable. However, before the failings of the reformation can be addressed, I think the Roman Catholic needs to address this problem of “having forgotten their first love.”

When I look at the Christian landscape, I think of Jesus’s messages to the various Churches in Revelation. All the churches offered something commendable, but unfortuantely, most of them failed to fully represent Him. If we were in Him, we would be one. One of the ways that the RCC could help this process (in addition to passion thing) is by showing a bit more humility. Many of the posts I have read on this site seem to tell me that the most committed catholics deny that many protestants want nothing more than to love and serve God; they also fervently deny that the Catholic Church has been and can be wrong, and has had any part in creating division among believers.


#2

Kendy,

I am sorry to ask, but what’s your point? I a little confused if this is a question, or just a statement?

A lot of people are in your same position. Left the Church for the same reasons and it is truely sad. Have you ever considered revisiting your faith and learning more about Catholicism?

God bless,
Rich


#3

John 17 says:
20"My prayer is not for them alone. I pray also for those who will believe in me through their message, 21that all of them may be one, Father, just as you are in me and I am in you. May they also be in us so that the world may believe that you have sent me. 22I have given them the glory that you gave me, that they may be one as we are one: 23I in them and you in me. May they be brought to complete unity to let the world know that you sent me and have loved them even as you have loved me. 24"Father, I want those you have given me to be with me where I am, and to see my glory, the glory you have given me because you loved me before the creation of the world. 25"Righteous Father, though the world does not know you, I know you, and they know that you have sent me. 26I have made you known to them, and will continue to make you known in order that the love you have for me may be in them and that I myself may be in them."

You saw a problem in the Catholic Church, and your solution to this was to jump ship and find another Church. Did it ever occur to you, that it might be your calling to stay in the Church and help to heal the errors of the Church from the inside?

Also, all of the Sacraments are Scriptural. And a lot of the objections you listed can be adequately explained. Have you taken a look at the library here at Catholic Answers? If you would like to discuss some of these objections, then read the relevant topic in the library and we can go from there. God bless.


#4

[quote=Kendy]Hi,

One of the ways that the RCC could help this process (in addition to passion thing) is by showing a bit more humility. Many of the posts I have read on this site seem to tell me that the most committed catholics deny that many protestants want nothing more than to love and serve God; they also fervently deny that the Catholic Church has been and can be wrong, and has had any part in creating division among believers.
[/quote]

Hi! So glad to have you on the forum. :wave:

First off I want to say most of my friends are protestant not Catholic and I as a Catholic certainly would never say that don’t have a great love for God and wanting to serve him.

Many Protestants have a zeal that you don’t necessarily see in many of today’s Catholic churches. There is also a distinctly different style of worship between the Catholic Church and many protestant faiths, and this can cause misunderstanding. Catholics generally value quiet reverence during mass while many Protestants value exuberant praise, both vocal and physical during their church services. Although I certainly agree there are lukewarm Catholics in the church, quiet reverence can be mistaken for “going through the motions”.

It has also been my experience that Protestants go to church to “get something”. I have had friends leave one church to go to another because they weren’t “getting fed”. Or they were no longer “getting anything out of it.” Or there wasn’t “good fellowship.” Catholics on the other hand go to church to give something. We are there to worship God, and give to him all of ourselves as part of the holy sacrifice of the Mass. Mass is not meant to be a social event but an event focused completely on God.

Of course we receive the greatest gift of all, Jesus in the Eucharist. As a Catholic leaving that is incomprehensible to me. That is as close as it is humanly possible to get Jesus. What a slap in the face of God it would be to turn that away for “fellowship” knowing the true presence in the Eucharist that we have in the Catholic Church.

The Church has apologized publicly for past wrongs. And while it is true it can not teach error when “speaking from the chair of Peter” there have certainly been great sinners in the church and I’m certain nearly all Catholics would acknowledge that.

Even within the Catholic Church today they are divisions that are truly heart breaking. There are misguided and defiant members with in the church that teach heresy. It makes me incredibly sad. My own generation was very poorly catechized and I think that is a very big part of the problem.

As far as unnecessary burdens, one must prayerfully embrace the teachings of the church since God promised that Holy Spirit would guide it in all truth. I have a life threatening illness that would make another pregnancy deadly for me. I use natural family planning, which is acceptable in the church. It’s not calendar rhythm. It’s very scientific, doesn’t cost me anything, doesn’t put chemicals in my body and it doesn’t put a barrier between my husband and I. I’ve used it for 9 years and the graces that have come into our marriage have been absolutely remarkable. I think NFP is an absolute gift that I wish was more widely known both within the Catholic Church and outside it.

As far as a celibate priesthood, I think the undo burden would fall on the family of a married priest who has great responsibilities to his parishioners. His focus must then be divided between those things of God and those things of this world.

The church is very wise. One can be stubborn and not even try to understand the teachings saying it’s just too difficult or one can be open to the grace God will to those who chose the will of his Bride-his church, over our own will.

Keep praying to God to guide you in truth always. Our faith isn’t about “feel-good religion” or about emotional experience it’s about following the will of God, following the church that was founded 2000 years ago that he promised the gates of hell would not prevail against. The church is a “hospital for sinners not a museum of saints” as the famous quote goes. Keep seeking truth always, study the church fathers-the first followers of Christ. ANd pray for unity as I do that someday we will all be one as Jesus instructed “let there be no divisions among you.” God Bless.


#5

This a passage form the Catechism of the Catholic Church I thought might be helpful to you. I added bold print to draw special attention to some areas.

817 In fact, "in this one and only Church of God from its very beginnings there arose certain rifts, which the Apostle strongly censures as damnable. But in subsequent centuries much more serious dissensions appeared and large communities became separated from full communion with the Catholic Church - for which, often enough, men of both sides were to blame."269 The ruptures that wound the unity of Christ’s Body - here we must distinguish heresy, apostasy, and schism270 - do not occur without human sin:

Where there are sins, there are also divisions, schisms, heresies, and disputes. Where there is virtue, however, there also are harmony and unity, from which arise the one heart and one soul of all believers.271

818 "However, one cannot charge with the sin of the separation those who at present are born into these communities [that resulted from such separation] and in them are brought up in the faith of Christ, and the Catholic Church accepts them with respect and affection as brothers . . . . All who have been justified by faith in Baptism are incorporated into Christ; they therefore have a right to be called Christians, and with good reason are accepted as brothers in the Lord by the children of the Catholic Church."272

819 "Furthermore, many elements of sanctification and of truth"273 are found outside the visible confines of the Catholic Church: "the written Word of God; the life of grace; faith, hope, and charity, with the other interior gifts of the Holy Spirit, as well as visible elements."274 Christ’s Spirit uses these Churches and ecclesial communities as means of salvation, whose power derives from the fullness of grace and truth that Christ has entrusted to the Catholic Church. All these blessings come from Christ and lead to him,275 and are in themselves calls to "Catholic unity."276

**Toward unity **

820 "Christ bestowed unity on his Church from the beginning. This unity, we believe, subsists in the Catholic Church as something she can never lose, and we hope that it will continue to increase until the end of time."277 Christ always gives his Church the gift of unity, but the Church must always pray and work to maintain, reinforce, and perfect the unity that Christ wills for her. This is why Jesus himself prayed at the hour of his Passion, and does not cease praying to his Father, for the unity of his disciples: "That they may all be one. As you, Father, are in me and I am in you, may they also be one in us, . . . so that the world may know that you have sent me."278 The desire to recover the unity of all Christians is a gift of Christ and a call of the Holy Spirit.279


#6

Well said Rayne.

Kendy. Please don’t take the criticism above too hard. The comments of “jumping ship” are not as harsh as they seem. Still, I believe it’s easy to see where they are comming from. My first reaction to your post was similar to be sure.

The question to ask yourself is who’s purpose did it serve when you left, your’s or God’s? And don’t get cute with your answer to circumvent owning up to the truth.

God Bless you M8.


#7

Comment: The question to ask yourself is who’s purpose did it serve when you left, your’s or God’s? And don’t get cute with your answer to circumvent owning up to the truth.

My Response: Well, I hope you don’t think this is at all cute:). But it was never my intention to serve anyone other than God when I left the church. Of course, I am not so arrogant as to say that I was not wrong, but I never intended to turn my back on God, but rather to leave an environment where I found it difficult to serve Him. If I was wrong, God has at least honored the intentions of my heart because He has remained faithful to me while I was outside of the RCC. The Holy Spirit has continued to nurture and guide me in serving God.

In love,
CKH


#8

[quote=Kendy]One of the ways that the RCC could help this process (in addition to passion thing) is by showing a bit more humility. Many of the posts I have read on this site seem to tell me that the most committed catholics deny that many protestants want nothing more than to love and serve God; they also fervently deny that the Catholic Church has been and can be wrong, and has had any part in creating division among believers.
[/quote]

Ok my confused brethren in Christ, I am not trying to be belittling, I will explain.

Catholics do not deny that our protestant siblings want to serve and love God. We think that it is great to serve and love God, and many of us see that love with in our Protestant siblings. For we should all preach and hear the message of our Lord.

With that said, we, Catholics do believe that while you are exposed to Christ and his awsome works of mercy, you just fall short of the “Fullness of Truth”. THis is not to be arrogant! Christ started the RCC, but it was called the Chirstian Church at the time, and set up it’s structure with Peter leading in his absence. The Holy Spirit quides the RCC through the Popes to keep it truthful to Christ. We only believe in infalliability of the pope when he makes statments of faith and morals under specific guidlines. Why, because the Holy Spirit will prevent the pope from making an error in doctrine/dogma of the RCC. Christ promised his protection to HIS church, which is why it has been around and the same since its conception. This is not arrogance, it is facts. :wink: Search your history.

As for the RCC being wrong, I said that above. when you want to blame the church as a whole, you are saying the whole barrel is bad because of a few bad apples. :frowning: The pope is still a man, and therefore suseptible to sin. He is only infallable when making statments decsribed above. The pope is not God, the pope does have weaknesses, but thoses weaknesses have not changed the church’s stance on faith and morals. This is why the RCC is the fullness of truth.

As for creating divisions in the church, no that would be man and their inability to follow Christ’s rules. You see, Christ said his Kingdom thus being a MONARCHY not a democracy. We do not get to vote on changes to God’s laws. The Holy Spirit would prevent this from happening in the RCC. But Jesus’s promise of protection does not convey over to our Protestant Siblings becuase they broke from his church. Look at the Lutheran Church, when Luther split he not only left the church, but changed doctrines to includes the SOLASES and took out books from the bible the support his theology. Just a few months ago the Lutheran church took a vote to see if they were going to accept gay marriage, something that is word for word in the bible as wrong! Does this look like something Jesus would want in his church? :confused:

At the Last supper Jesus let those disciples leave who could not handle the transubstanciation. He knew those disciples loved him and would follow everything, BUT … What did Jesus do, he let them go. He did not make it more pallitable for those men, he said accept it or not the choice is yours.

As for the Reformation, yes some clarity was needed to clear up some abuses going on in the church, but there were not changes in doctrine or dogma. Again man fell weak to his temptations, so clarity was needed, and it was made. Man, some high ranking ones, but not the Church, was twisting things around like the problem with indulgences. The indulgences were being bought and sold before the sin was being committed, this was WRONG! It would be like giving permission to be bad, so it was stopped! Indulgences still exsist, but not in the way most people think of them. Indulgences are things that bring us closer to God AFTER we have sined, like prayer, reading scripture, helping the poor, etc. We indulge in being closer to God when we do these things for God. As a once cradle Catholic you should have heard the phrase “offer it up!” :slight_smile:


#9

Cont.

As for the bible, did you ever go to church? At church we read and are read from the bible. One OT read, one NT reading and one Gosple reading. And it is a different one each day of the year (unless it is a vigil mass, then it would be the same at the next day mass). As Scott Hahn pointed out if you went to mass everyday for three years, you would have covered the whole bible not just your pastor’s favorite passages. And who was stopping you from reading the bible, not the church, not God. THe church lists reading the bible for 30 minutes gives you an indulgence (a step closer to God). If we did not want you to read the bible, why would it be listed!

The “born-again” on fire feeling is due to being a cradle Catholic and taking advantage of what you were blessed to be born into. Because you grew up in it, you did not see the magnificentness or reverence it deserves. I am assuming you are a post Vatican II child, I have been having wonderful discussion with my priest who was ordained the same year as VII. He educates us on how the US misunderstood most of VII and began to loose the revernce it once had. He explains how people did not have to be taught or retaught the faith because they lived it. They knew it in their heart. You should read Scott Hahn’s Lamb’s Supper, this will be a real eye opener for most cradle catholics about the greatness of the mass, it was for me. :thumbsup:


#10

I’m sorry you didn’t have a good experience with Catholics, but then that’s often a case of locality: my parish is vibrant and on fire (and yes, we read Scripture). From what I hear you saying, it’s possible that if you had been going to my parish, you might not have left. How sad that your faith is dependent on your assessment of what those in the pews around you are doing! Here’s a hint: people will always disappoint you, no matter where you are. It’s better to seek truth than to use men as your guide.


#11

[quote=Kendy]Hi,

At some point when I was studying for confirmation and doubting there was a God, I had a real encounter with God and I was absolutely enthused about Him. I became extremely dedicated to the church and tried very hard to learn more and be an active participant, but I also started reading the bible— something I had never seen any catholics do in my life. Perhaps, had there been catholics teaching me how to enterpret the bible, I would not have left the church, but whenever I would take a question I had about scripture to someone in the church, like my pastor, he seem to want to brush scripture aside.

As time went on, I began to believe that there was no scriptural justification for sacraments other than baptism and communion, and possibly confession. I also no longer believed in the authority of the Pope. When I read the book of ACTS, it doesn’t seem at all evident that Peter thought he was in charge of everyone. There seemed to have been to be a collaborative spirit among the apostles as the Holy Spirit revealed the various gifts of people and called them to serve.
[/quote]

I will agree with your point that 40 or so years ago Scripture was infact neglected by many Catholics. With Vatican II Recalling the important place of Scripture in the life of the Church with the Eucharist being in the central place. I suggest you read a small document from Vatican II called Dei Verbum - The Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation to understand the place of Scripture in the Catholic Church today.


#12

I would also like to bring up a point about the bible.

Are you aware that there is a plenary indulgence available to all catholics if, when in a state of grace and following the normal rules for indulgences, they read scripture devoutly for 1/2 an hour.

This is such an incredible gift and great encouragement to read the bible.

Also, I was in the same positi on as you are, although I was lapsed before getting into the whole protestant thing.

I had a bit of an epiphany (and a breakdown) when I couldn’t figure out who to believe because there were so many interpretations of scripture. It was that moment that I clearly saw why the church as we have it today is absolutely necessary.

In time, I saw every single argument against catholicism slowly crumble as I did more and more research. The Bible clearly points to what we as catholics have and everything that I ever read attacking the church was sensationalized and poorly researched.

Please reconsider your decision, and also look inside yourself. Could the experience you had of God possibly have just come from your own mind, or from the devil?


#13

originally posted by** Kendy**
I will admit that I did not know much about the church when I left.

You say this and then follow it with accusation after accusation against the Church that you admit you don’t know much about.
What is your point?
From your post, it looks as though you are here to convert us Catholics from our wayward ways. :rolleyes: Gee, where have we heard this before?!? :yawn:

I think the Roman Catholic needs to address this problem of "having forgotten their first love.

Regardless of what YOU think, “the gates of Hell will not prevail against” The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church.
No matter how many people like you desert Her and try to preach against Her.


#14

Have you ever heard the phrase “silent waters run deep”? One can be “on fire” for God without jumping around etc.

No one but God can judge how fervent a person is for Him.

I had alot of the same difficulties with the Church when I left it. I admit I was wrong on everything. When I left I thought I knew the Church, but I didn’t really. Maybe it was there all along for me to see but I couldn’t because I wasn’t ready for it yet. I left when I was 17 and came back when I was 33. Maybe you are getting ready & that’s why you’re here.


#15

[quote=Kendy]Comment: The question to ask yourself is who’s purpose did it serve when you left, your’s or God’s? And don’t get cute with your answer to circumvent owning up to the truth.

My Response: Well, I hope you don’t think this is at all cute:). But it was never my intention to serve anyone other than God when I left the church. Of course, I am not so arrogant as to say that I was not wrong, but I never intended to turn my back on God, but rather to leave an environment where I found it difficult to serve Him. If I was wrong, God has at least honored the intentions of my heart because He has remained faithful to me while I was outside of the RCC. The Holy Spirit has continued to nurture and guide me in serving God.

In love,
CKH
[/quote]

“leave an environment where I found it difficult to serve Him.”

Are supposed to choose the easy path when serving God? However, I do understand. We are supposed to surround ourselves with likeminded people, and if there were no Catholic Christians (or none that you could hook up with), it would be very difficult to stay.

However, I will say this, you are simply wrong when you say there is no Scriptural support for the Sacraments. The Catholic Church is the most biblical church I have ever been in (Nazarene, Assembly of God and Evangelical to name a few.)

The first thing Christ did after rising from the dead was institute the Sacrament of Reconciliation!
:bible1: John 20: 21-23 Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you. As the Father has snet me, so I send you.” 22And when he had said this, he breathed on them and said to them, “Receive the holy Spirit. 23 Whose sins you forgive are forgiven them, and whose sins you retain are retained.”

Jesus did not say go and teach forgiveness, He gave the apostles the power to go and forgive in His name. Only God forgives sin, but Christ gave the apostles the authority to do so in His name.

Try going here and looking through some scripture. Scripture Catholic has scripture by topic.

Example from Scripture Catholic on confession

John 20:21 - before He grants them the authority to forgive sins, Jesus says to the apostles, “as the Father sent me, so I send you.” As Christ was sent by the Father to forgive sins, so Christ sends the apostles and their successors forgive sins.

John 20:22 - the Lord “breathes” on the apostles, and then gives them the power to forgive and retain sins. The only other moment in Scripture where God breathes on man is in Gen. 2:7, when the Lord “breathes” divine life into man. When this happens, a significant transformation takes place. John 20:23 - Jesus says, “If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven. If you retain the sins of any, they are retained.” In order for the apostles to exercise this gift of forgiving sins, the penitents must orally confess their sins to them because the apostles are not mind readers. The text makes this very clear.

God Bless,
Maria


#16

[quote=catsrus]You say this and then follow it with accusation after accusation against the Church that you admit you don’t know much about.
What is your point?
From your post, it looks as though you are here to convert us Catholics from our wayward ways. :rolleyes: Gee, where have we heard this before?!? :yawn:

Regardless of what YOU think, “the gates of Hell will not prevail against” The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church.
No matter how many people like you desert Her and try to preach against Her.
[/quote]

While I understand your feelings, catsrus, accusations of this kind aren’t going to help the OP. At the risk of being preachy, I would remind you, and all of us including yours truly, that apologetics isn’t about blame or winning points or telling people off–it’s about helping confused people come to understand the truth, beauty, love and joy found within the Catholic Church.

It’s about helping them to recognize that the fullness of truth subsists within the Catholic Church, the Church Christ founded, which he promised would be led into all truth by the Holy Spirit, and which will still be saving souls and spreading the Gospel until he returns as he said it would. Don’t you agree with me? :wink:


#17

So are you looking for a perfect Church? I’ve got news for you, you won’t find it. I was raised southern baptist and converted to the Catholic faith. All that wonderful zeal and feelings of being “born again” often masks wickedness and selfishness. I know this personally. Feelings come and go; zeal waxes and wanes; but Jesus promised the apostles to lead them into all truth. If there is no one visible Church that we can identify as preaching the entire truth, then how can we be confident about any Church? The Church is a hospital of sinners. Jesus never promised us that Christians in the Church would not fall away; become cold in their love; or do downright wicked things. I confess that I often struggle; especially with the wickedness and incompetency of our Bishops. But then I realize that the more I am focusing on the wickedness of others in the church, the less I am focusing on my own sins. If I leave the church because I perceive others to be too sinful or not zealous enough; then I am making myself the arbiter of correct christian spirituality and love. I am becoming the judger of hearts. Just something to think about.


#18

originally posted by Della
accusations of this kind aren’t going to help the OP. At the risk of being preachy, I would remind you, and all of us including yours truly, that apologetics isn’t about blame or winning points or telling people off–it’s about helping confused people come to understand the truth, beauty, love and joy found within the Catholic Ch

Whose accusing whom? The op is the person who posted a thread accusing The Church of error after error. I accuse her of preaching against The Church here, which is exactly what she is doing.
I was not attempting to win points, only pointing out that coming onto a Catholic board, starting a thread about how her “new found religion” is so much better than her old Catholicism and why, is a ploy we have seen many times and is old hat here, and I, for one, am mighty tired of it!
Most of these type posters are not coming here looking for answers or wanting to discuss differing views. They are here to tell us how wrong we are and how right they are now that they’ve “seen the light”. Re-read her original post please.
Thanks for the lecture but my opinion here is not less valuable than anyone else’s opinion.


#19

Kendy, your post made me think of this passage in Theology for Beginners written by the late Frank Sheed:

It is the especial meaning of the Church that in it Our Lord unites men to Himself through humanity – not through some ideal humanity, but through the humanity, good, bad, and indifferent that actually exists. As Matthew Arnold notes, where other religions suggest a special type of man, Catholics suggest ‘all the pell mell of the men and women of Shakespeare’s plays. There is a certain kind of spiritual man who finds all this intolerable. His every instinct is revolted at the thought of Christ’s working in and through, and of himself being sanctified in and through, this mixed crowd of human beings. The hot smell of humanity is too strong for him. He would have his own direct relation with God, excluding the turbulence of humanity; or he would make his own choice of the men he feels God would choose. But this is preciousness and folly. It is as though the man Christ healed by the touch of His spittle had asked to be healed some other way – he was a refined man, perhaps, brought up to regard spittle as vulgar, or even unhygienic. One cannot be thus delicate about the Gifts of God.’

It’s time for you to learn more about the Church you left.


#20

Welcome to the boards, you are in good company as several of us here have come over from Evangelical churches such as Calvary Chapel (the papa of Vineyard) and other churches.

I grew up Catholic and never realized what I left, and I too learned interesting concepts like the priesthood of all believers, and you know what the Catholic Church believes that too. We just don’t deny that there are Priests (presbyters) also who are called by God to serve. You can see this in Acts which shows not all are called and some just want to be Pastors without a calling. Just look up Simon Magus Acts 8:9-24.

I came back to the Catholic Church in at the beginning of this year and can’t be happier. I still spend time with my friend from Calvary Chapel but now that I have some answers they prefer to talk to me about other things than religion. Unfortunately my friends are not like you and open to talking a little bit with Catholics about beliefs.

God Bless and if you have any specific things you want to talk about you can PM me,
Scylla


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