Luke 14:33


#1

I have a question about some verses of Luke's Gospel, chapter 10.

"In the same way, everyone of you who does not renounce all his possessions cannot be my disciple."

Is this directed solely at the disciples who followed Jesus around while he physically walked the earth, or is this to all Christians? I'm praying on this and now I'm worried. It seems to me that Jesus is saying to live on the streets.

And what about 10:26, where He says to hate others in order to be His disciple? What about the commandment to love everyone? Am I just reading these verses out of context?

I understand that He is saying that you cannot allow anything or anyone to get in the way of your relationship with Him, but I feel like I'm still not understanding something.

Does the Catholic church have any official teachings on these verses?


#2

[quote="dog_lover90, post:1, topic:324103"]
I have a question about some verses of Luke's Gospel, chapter 10.

"In the same way, everyone of you who does not renounce all his possessions cannot be my disciple."

Is this directed solely at the disciples who followed Jesus around while he physically walked the earth, or is this to all Christians? I'm praying on this and now I'm worried. It seems to me that Jesus is saying to live on the streets.

[/quote]

"Renounce", here, does not mean "giving up all one's possessions, and leading a mendicant lifestyle", as it would in, say some traditions of Hinduism or Buddhism. Rather, it means, "do not allow your possessions to become more important or valuable than Me in your lives." Some Catholic religious live this verse in the highest sense (the Missionaries of Charity are the most recent example), but the broader interpretation - that even if you have goods, use them wisely, share them, and do not allow them to become an idol or a stumbling block - is the "standard" one followed in the Church.

And what about 10:26, where He says to hate others in order to be His disciple? What about the commandment to love everyone? Am I just reading these verses out of context?

I understand that He is saying that you cannot allow anything or anyone to get in the way of your relationship with Him, but I feel like I'm still not understanding something.

Does the Catholic church have any official teachings on these verses?

The Jerusalem Bible has an illuminating footnote on this verse: "A Hebraic way of expressing total detachment."

Aramaic does not have a word for "love less" or "favour less"; see, for example, Genesis 25ff (Leah was "hated", but Jacob still had six sons by her) or Malachi 1 (the Edomites were not "hated" literally, but were not the chosen people, and were punished because of their actions against Israel), so this may be a case of the Greek expressing something that wasn't there in the Aramaic (as in the often quoted petros / petra debate). :)


#3

Chapter 14 of St. Luke is probably meant here. As to the possessions, St. Bede the Venerable explains that while not everyone leaves all things behind still every believer should renounce worldly matters in the sense of deeming them transient and not to be clung to. Similarly the Haydock Commentary teaches that as we are obliged to love even our opponents Christ means in 14:26 that God should be our greatest priority above family members. In general Biblical and Patristic Commentaries are good sources to clear up verses which seem obscure.

St. Bede the Venerable:

BEDE; But there is a difference between renouncing all things and leaving all things. For it is the way of few perfect men to leave all things, that is, to cast behind them the cares of the world, but it is the part of all the faithful to renounce all things, that is, so to hold the things of’ the world as by them not to be held in the world.

Haydock Commentary:

Hate not, &c. The law of Christ does not allow us to hate even our enemies, much less our parents: but the meaning of the text is, that we must be in that disposition of soul so as to be willing to renounce and part with every thing, how near or dear soever it may be to us, that would keep us from following Christ. Ch.


#4

[quote="dog_lover90, post:1, topic:324103"]
I have a question about some verses of Luke's Gospel, chapter 10.

"In the same way, everyone of you who does not renounce all his possessions cannot be my disciple."

Is this directed solely at the disciples who followed Jesus around while he physically walked the earth, or is this to all Christians? I'm praying on this and now I'm worried. It seems to me that Jesus is saying to live on the streets.

And what about 10:26, where He says to hate others in order to be His disciple? What about the commandment to love everyone? Am I just reading these verses out of context?

I understand that He is saying that you cannot allow anything or anyone to get in the way of your relationship with Him, but I feel like I'm still not understanding something.

Does the Catholic church have any official teachings on these verses?

[/quote]

Clearly earthly, transient possessions are ultimately useless to eternal beings.
Bearing this in mind helps keep perspective. It is just money, things, fleeting gratification; the pain in its eventual loss is part of a growth process in which you more and more have your treasures in heaven.
Although some take a vow of poverty, it sounds like this is not your route.
Live your life for God and others; that is what is important.

Is there someone in your life leading you away from God? Hopefully you won't meet many, but there are people who will seduce you, use you, hurt you and sabotage your efforts to be a more loving person. It is best to avoid them

This all seems to be common sense.


#5

From the Commentary to Luke 14:33 in the New American Bible, St. Joseph edition:

"This collection of sayings ... focuses on the total dedication necessary for the disciple of Jesus. No attachment to family (26) or possessions (33) can stand in the way of the total commitment demanded of the disciple."


#6

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