Luke 2:52

Luke 2:52 says:

And Jesus advanced in wisdom, and age, and grace with God and men

I find this very interesting. How would Jesus grow in wisdom if he knows all? Ok “age” is obvious, no problem there. The last part really gets me. “Grace with God and men” how in the world could God grow in grace with God? Let’s see, Jesus has two natures, one divine and one human. Is this passage speaking of his human nature only? I’d be really interested to learn what others have to say about this. Thanks!

=Rocko;5654001]Luke 2:52 says:

I find this very interesting. How would Jesus grow in wisdom if he knows all? Ok “age” is obvious, no problem there. The last part really gets me. “Grace with God and men” how in the world could God grow in grace with God? Let’s see, Jesus has two natures, one divine and one human. Is this passage speaking of his human nature only? I’d be really interested to learn what others have to say about this. Thanks!

***Good question:thumbsup:

The verse speaks ONLY of His seperate HUMAN NATURE. While His Godly Nature knew [knows everything] in His Human nature Jesus had yet TO EXPERIENCE first had a great many things. So what the verse is saying is that Jesus grew in EXPERINCE that gave Him human “wisdom / understanding” as a result of the experiences.

Gods Human nature was always united with the Trinity, but because His human and Godly naturs were seperate, he was in His human nature able to benefit from grace, as we too can do.***

Love and prayers,

C.S. Lewis argues pretty persuasively that one of the ways that Jesus “emptied Himself” was of omniscience, and that His human nature couldn’t be both fully human and omniscient (since the brain has a physical limit to its capacity).

Whether or not He ever got anything *factually *incorrect is another fascinating subject. Obviously, He wasn’t born speaking every language on Earth. He had to be taught just about everything, just like everyone else. So it seems that He probably made mistakes… which is a pretty weird thought. Like Jesus forgetting the right word for something, or perhaps even forgetting someone’s name. It’s clear from the Bible that there are times when He’s divinely inspired with information - like knowing about the Samaritan woman at the well’s relationship history, etc. But other times, He’s left asking, “Who touched me?” after feeling the power go out from Him.

You might want to read Hebrews chapter 2.

You made him for a little while lower than the angels; you crowned him with glory and honor,

Jesus was a carpenter by trade and he had to learn these skills. Did he make mistakes learning this craft? I am sure he did. He had to learn all the skills that we learn as children. He had feelings, he experienced joy, sadness, anger, wonder and love.

We can also see from scripture Luke 2:48, that Jesus was aware of his divine nature or at least his obedience to his fathers will. Because at an early age he was found in the temple teaching and asking questions.

He is like us in all things but sin.

totally off topic:

i am wrapping up “Outline of Sanity” and i plan to read “An Essay on the Restoration of Property”; any thoughts?

I’ve read neither, but I’m interested in hearing what you have to say about them!

The Catechism teaches us this;

"the fourth ecumenical council, at Chalcedon in 451, confessed:

Following the holy Fathers, we unanimously teach and confess one and the same Son, our Lord Jesus Christ: the same perfect in divinity and perfect in humanity, the same truly God and truly man, composed of rational soul and body; consubstantial with the Father as to his divinity and consubstantial with us as to his humanity; "like us in all things but sin". He was begotten from the Father before all ages as to his divinity and in these last days, for us and for our salvation, was born as to his humanity of the virgin Mary, the Mother of God. 
We confess that one and the same Christ, Lord, and only-begotten Son, is to be acknowledged in two natures without confusion, change, division or separation.** The distinction between the natures was never abolished by their union, but rather the character proper to each of the two natures was preserved as they came together in one person (prosopon) and one hypostasis.** (CCC 467)

Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, Ora Pro Nobis Peccatoribus!

mark

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