Luke 6:30


#1

“Give to everyone who asks of you, and from the one who takes what is yours do not demand it back.”

Are we to take this at face value–if someone steals something from us, we are to allow it? Additionally, “give to everyone who asks of you” is virtually impossible in this day and age. I don’t have the resources to give to every person and organization who asks me for money. But the words are not “give if you can afford it.” It is “give to everyone who asks.” And even the most faithful Catholics I know would ask for the return of stolen property. This troubles me. We take Jesus’ words at face value when it comes to divorce, but it appears that we do not do so with regards to this Scripture. Any help?


#2

[quote="Rachel126, post:1, topic:328551"]
"Give to everyone who asks of you, and from the one who takes what is yours do not demand it back." Are we to take this at face value--if someone steals something from us, we are to allow it?

Additionally, "give to everyone who asks of you" is virtually impossible in this day and age. I don't have the resources to give to every person and organization who asks me for money. But the words are not "give if you can afford it." It is "give to everyone who asks." And even the most faithful Catholics I know would ask for the return of stolen property.

This troubles me. We take Jesus' words at face value when it comes to divorce, but it appears that we do not do so with regards to this Scripture. Any help?

[/quote]

We are not to allow it, because He also said: "thou shall not steal", and obviously God does not contradict Himself, nor can Scripture be abolished.

As for the return of stolen property, I never found myself in that situation, but I guess when it comes down to that, I will have to face the Word on the basis of which I shall be judged, and decide whether or not I would be willing to sacrifice material properties that were unjustly taken from me in order to do the Father's will.

Same applies to "give to everyone who asks". This I know that I do not do. And yes, we will have to answer for it unless we start changing things and doing more. After all, we are not asked to give thousands of dollars, but to give - whatever we may give within our state of life and without breaking our obligations towards our family. When asked for money, Peter (who at that time had none with him) gave a blessing. Sometimes we are forced to do the same. It hurts nobody, when we cannot spare a dollar for this or that request, to spare a sincere, heartfelt prayer or a small penance offered on behalf of that cause.

Remember what the apostle said: "This teaching is hard." Nobody denies that! We are not called to be comfy and live comfy lives, but to deny self and take up the cross. We are not called to become a satisfied men or women, but saints. That does take some effort ;)

(And thank God that the suggestion to "sell everything and give it to the poor" is not another similar basic tenet of faith, but a suggestion of a heroic act that leads to a more perfect life...otherwise I guess only friars would be doing the will of Christ :D)


#3

My husband & I were discussing this just last week. We are near the poverty level ourselves, so while we have chosen to tithe, we can't give more than that, especially to random beggers.

In Acts 3:1-6, Peter & John are asked for alms. Instead of giving money, Peter said, "I have no silver and gold, but give you what I have; in the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, rise and walk." Which the begger then did.

Taking the verse about giving to whoever asks in context, we decided it means that we are to give what we can. In our case, that is directions to the nearest shelter, free meals, food bank, St. Vincent de Paul, etc., and our prayers.

As far as we know, our prayers haven't produced any miracles, but we know that God can help these people much more than we can.

Back when we lived near a large city, where my husband worked, he would sometimes bring home homeless women with children. We were able to shelter & feed them for a few days until other resources could be found. We stopped doing that after the kids were born as it was sometimes dangerous.

Part of my husband's job at that time was what the parish called the Front Door Ministry. People would come for help, my husband would try to match them up with services. But many just wanted money for drugs or drink and they would work some pretty clever scams to convert rent or grocery help into cash.

Our experience with the Front Door Ministry and St. Vincent de Paul showed us that it isn't a good idea to give cash, especially to just anyone who asks.


#4

Many blessings to you and your husband for your service.


#5

Jesus taught perfection and nothing less. When He says give away everything you have and come follow me (Luke 18:22) He was teaching perfection. Look at their reaction: 26*They who heard it said, "Then who can be saved?" 27*But He said, "The things that are impossible with people are possible with God."

We can still be saved even with our lack of perfection. Even Jesus said to His disciples to take nothing with them, and later He asks "were you lacking anything?" They replied, "nothing Lord."

God doesn't expect you to be perfect, but He asks perfection of you.


#6

[quote="dronald, post:5, topic:328551"]
Jesus taught perfection and nothing less. When He says give away everything you have and come follow me (Luke 18:22) He was teaching perfection. Look at their reaction: 26*They who heard it said, "Then who can be saved?" 27*But He said, "The things that are impossible with people are possible with God."

We can still be saved even with our lack of perfection. Even Jesus said to His disciples to take nothing with them, and later He asks "were you lacking anything?" They replied, "nothing Lord."

God doesn't expect you to be perfect, but He asks perfection of you.

[/quote]

That reminds me of a conversation i had with a protestant friend about divorce. I explained that as Catholics we take Jesus' words at face value about anyone who divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery, that's why we don't permit remarriage, etc. His response was that Jesus meant that statement to be an ideal...one of the perfection that we should strive to, but, as you said, we can be saved even with our lack of perfection. I had no answer for him.


#7

=Rachel126;10825267]"Give to everyone who asks of you, and from the one who takes what is yours do not demand it back."

Are we to take this at face value--if someone steals something from us, we are to allow it? Additionally, "give to everyone who asks of you" is virtually impossible in this day and age. I don't have the resources to give to every person and organization who asks me for money. But the words are not "give if you can afford it." It is "give to everyone who asks." And even the most faithful Catholics I know would ask for the return of stolen property. This troubles me. We take Jesus' words at face value when it comes to divorce, but it appears that we do not do so with regards to this Scripture. Any help?

Prudence IS a Virtue:)

It means "DON"T count the cost"

God's in charge

TRUST in Devine Providence Prudently:thumbsup:


#8

[quote="Rachel126, post:1, topic:328551"]
"Give to everyone who asks of you, and from the one who takes what is yours do not demand it back."

Are we to take this at face value--if someone steals something from us, we are to allow it? Additionally, "give to everyone who asks of you" is virtually impossible in this day and age. I don't have the resources to give to every person and organization who asks me for money. But the words are not "give if you can afford it." It is "give to everyone who asks." And even the most faithful Catholics I know would ask for the return of stolen property. This troubles me. We take Jesus' words at face value when it comes to divorce, but it appears that we do not do so with regards to this Scripture. Any help?

[/quote]

D-R Bible, Haydock Commentary:

Ver. 30. Jesus Christ does not order us never to refuse a petition: but the meaning of his words is, that we are to give what is just and reasonable, what will be neither injurious to yourself nor your family; for what is unjustly asked, may be justly denied. (St. Augustine, lib. x. chap. 40. de serm. Dom. in Monte.) --- But in this, the sin we commit is often far from trivial; particularly, when to the refusal of a just request, we add also reprehensions and complaints. For why, say we, does he not labour? why has he reduced himself to penury, through his own indolence?---But, tell me, do you live upon the fruits of your own industry? On the supposition that you do, is it not that you may have some plea to reprehend another for the morsel of bread he begs at your hands? You give him no charitable relief, give him then no contumelious words: if you have no compassion for him yourself, do not prevent others from shewing him commiseration. Abraham, in the number of guests he received, had the honour of receiving under his roof even angels. Let us not, therefore, be strict and unfavourable judges in regard of our suffering and distressed neighbours, lest perhaps we ourselves come to be more severely judged. (St. Chrysostom collected from hom. xxi. in ep. ad. Rom. --- Hom. xi. in ep. ad. Heb. and hom. ii. de Lazaro.)


#9

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