Lutheran confirmation-ELCA


#1

What does confirmation in the ELCA Lutheran church mean? My husband’s niece was confirmed yesterday, and I find myself curious about what this means in the Lutheran religion? Is it a sacrament? How does it compare to the Catholic sacrament of Confirmation?
Thanks!


#2

Confirmation in the Lutheran church means that you go to classes for 2 years and study the bible and Luther’s Catechism. You watch the black and white movie about Martin Luther, then you recite the Apostles’ Creed and some other stuff. Then you are a confirmed Christian and can recieve communion. Then you give a speech in front of a bunch of other Lutherans. Lutheransim has 3 sacraments: Baptism, Communion, and (that’s right) Confession. They follow the Apostles’ Creed, the Nicene Creed, and whatever Athanasius’ Creed is called, as well as the Book of Concord, which I have never read. That’s all I can remember right now.


#3

LOL! If only we got off so easy!

My home church is LCMS, and we had two years of “boot camp” classes, memorization, and study of the early church fathers (seems to always bug people when I say that) and the doctrines of faith. I think we spent about 2 weeks on Luther, but that was mainly during the Sunday school classes, not the Confirmation classes.

Confirmation is a reaffermation of baptism, and is not considered a sacrament because it has no visible means, was not instituted by Jesus, and does not forgive sins. It is a statement by the confirmand to continue in the church. Not all do get confirmed, so choose not to, and some are judged by the pastor as not ready.

Hope that helps.


#4

Confirmation is not that much different between Lutheran Synods.

Confirmation is a custom of the church and not a sacrament. It links the catechumens to their Baptism, celebrates the reception of the Lord’s Word among them and, in cases where the candidates have not yet communed, welcomes them to the Lord’s Table. Luther strongly urges in both catechisms that those who are unwilling to learn, at the very least, the Ten Commandments, the Creed, and the Lord’s Prayer should not be admitted to the Sacrament. Baptized Christians are admitted to the Sacrament when they have been examined and absolved by their pastor in accordance with the practice outlined in the Augsburg Confession (Article XXV).

Confirmation declares of a catechumen that he/she is a Christian who has been baptized, confesses the faith, and is in communion with Christ and His Church. The reception of catechumens to the Lord’s Table assumes that ongoing catechesis is the way of life for the faithful Christian. This rite emphasizes God’s work in Baptism, the gift of faith, and the promises of the Lord’s Supper for all who believe in Christ and the words of His testament.

Guidance for pastoral examination of candidates is provided in the Agenda: Pastoral Care.

The Rite of Confirmation takes place in the Divine Service before the Prayer of the Church, or in the baptismal liturgy of the Vigil of Easter. Catechumens gather near the font, before the chancel steps, or before the altar as local custom dictates.


#5

quote=RedGolume had two years of “boot camp” classes, memorization, and study of the early church fathers (seems to always bug people when I say that) and the doctrines of faith
[/quote]

Just curious… which early church fathers did you study?

[quote=RedGolum]Confirmation is a reaffermation of baptism, and is not considered a sacrament because it has no visible means, was not instituted by Jesus, and does not forgive sins.
[/quote]

Tertullian, Hippolytus, Cyprian of Carthage, and the rest of the fathers quoted at catholic.com/library/Confirmation.asp clearly believed that Confirmation was (and is) a Sacrament, imparted via the imposition of hands for the completion of baptismal grace (Acts 8:14-17; 19:5-6; Heb 6:2).

Very early, the better to signify the gift of the Holy Spirit, an anointing with perfumed oil (chrism) was added to the laying on of hands. This anointing highlights the name “Christian,” which means “anointed” and derives from that of Christ himself whom God “anointed with the Holy Spirit.” (CCC 1289). In fact the earliest use of the name “Christian” is in Acts 12:26, by the Apostle Luke himself!


#6

Origen, Tetullian, Clement, and while not really a ECF, Augustine. We covered a wide range of topics, and those four are the only ones that stood out. I know that there were more but it has been long enough that I can’t remember which ones we covered in confirmation and which ones we looked at in other classes. While all of the above mentioned do not agree with all of Lutheran theology, they don’t agree with all of Roman Catholic theology either (Clement I believe really didn’t like singing or any type of music, and was very outspoken about it).

Lutheran Theology has a different view of what qualifies as a sacrament than Roman Catholics or Eastern Orthodox do. For it to be a sacrament it has to have been institued by Jesus, use “visible means” like the water in baptism, and convey the forgiveness of sins. I may not be describing that the best. :o
I think the Orthodox have about 12 sacraments, and I know that the number and defination of Roman Catholic sacraments varied from 5-7 till the time of Aquanis at least.

As far as confirmation being the finishing up of baptism, that is pretty much what Lutherans believe (although probably not as simple as that). It isn’t a sacrament because it wasn’t clearly started by Jesus in the Scriptures, but is a rite, which tends to confuse things even more!

I am not sure, but I seem to remember my grandfather talking about oil in confirmation when he was a boy. The German Lutheran chruches of that time did things a bit different. In the early 1900’s, the American Lutheran churches modified some of the outward signs to be able to “blend in” more. For instance, it used to be very rare to see a crucifix in a Lutheran church, but you are begginning to see that more and more. Also, in the LCMS at least, more attention is being paid to the feasts of the saints and such. The used to just be mentioned in readings, (except for St. Mary, which would bring out the white vestments), and now more effort is being made to at least mention them in the sermons.


#7

(Clement I believe really didn’t like singing or any type of music, and was very outspoken about it).

Clement of Alexandria? I thought he was the guy who wrote all the Christian hymns. Maybe I’m mistaken. I’m pretty sure that he held some Gnostic beliefs, according to the Catholic Church.


#8

Clement didn’t like music that much. I think he composed hymns, but he was very against instruments.

I think I was thinking of Cyprian, who was not found of any type of music, and I got the two mixed up when I wrote the first reply.

Need to remember to drink coffee before posting!:smiley:


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