Lutheran view of sainthood


#1

I attended a funeral for a wonderful lady who reached the age of 91 last week. She was a life long Lutheran and practiced her faith sincerely.

During the eulogy the minister talked about her and all gathered who believe, and referred to all of us as saints. He specifically mentioned that this belief is in contrast to religions who hold out those who have performed special deeds while they were alive and have now passed on to their reward.

He used Acts 9:13 and 9:23 where Peter referred to “visiting the saints in Lydda” and other examples of where believers are referred to as saints.

Why did Peter refer to others (believers) as “saints” ? Is this is a basis for Lutheran doctrine of Sola Fide? How do we as Catholics reconcile this use of “saint” in terms of our doctrine of sainthood?


#2

I just read Acts9:13 and 23 in a Douay-Rheims and a KJV bible and those verses have nothing to do with Peter.

Did you make a mistake?


#3

Sorry, I meant to paste this to my original post

“Lord,” Ananias answered, "I have heard many reports about this man and all the harm he has done to your saints in Jerusalem.
(Whole Chapter: Acts 9 In context: Acts 9:12-14)

Acts 9:32
As Peter traveled about the country, he went to visit the saints in Lydda.
(Whole Chapter: Acts 9 In context: Acts 9:31-33)

I believe this was in NIV


#4

[quote=janman55]…referred to all of us as saints. He specifically mentioned that this belief is in contrast to religions who hold out those who have performed special deeds while they were alive and have now passed on to their reward.
[/quote]

I can only guess that the minister was referring to the “supposed” Catholic view of saints. :rolleyes:

As Catholics, we beleive that we are part of the communion of saints. They “think” we need to do special deeds in order to become saints, but they are wrong when they think this. We are saints by the grace of God - we do “special deeds” because that is what we are called by God to do.


#5

In the Bible the the word “saint” means any believer. Paul, for example, addresses the book of Ephesians like this: “Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God, To the saints in Ephesus, the faithful in Christ Jesus . . .” If you do a word search this is the consistent use. The Bible does not associate the word “saint” with Catholic views of sainthood.


#6

In Lutheranism, we believed that the saints were those of the first generation: The Apostles, Mark, Luke, Mary Magdelene, Barnabas, whoever St.Lawrence is, St.Stephen, ect.

You get the picture.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.