Macron Leads in French Race as Scandal Upends Fillon’s Plans


#1

bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2017-02-01/macron-takes-lead-in-french-race-as-scandal-upends-fillon-plans

**Macron Leads in French Race as Scandal Upends Fillon’s Plans

Emmanuel Macron stepped into the void left by rival Francois Fillon, setting out the first elements of his policy plans as he became the de-facto front-runner in France’s 2017 presidential election.

Macron would beat the National Front’s Marine Le Pen in May’s presidential run-off by a margin of 65 percent to 35 percent, according to an Elabe poll for Les Echos and Radio Classique published Wednesday. The independent Macron would win about 23 percent of votes in the first round of voting, compared with 20 percent for Fillon and 27 percent for Le Pen, Elabe said.**


#2

wsj.com/articles/outsider-gains-ground-in-french-presidential-race-1485984099

**Outsider Gains Ground in French Presidential Race

Pro-European candidate Emmanuel Macron climbs in opinion polls as rivals take a harder line

As recently as December, you could get odds of 16:1 on Emmanuel Macron winning the French presidency. Most pundits were convinced that the 39 year-old former economy minister, who quit President Francois Hollande’s government to run as an independent candidate, stood little chance.

At a time when European voters are embracing anti-austerity, euroskeptic populist parties, Mr. Macron is an unabashed pro-European and enthusiast for liberal market reform.

He has never held elected office, has no national party organization behind him, and seemed doomed to end up competing for the crowded center ground against a Republican party led by the centrist Alain Juppé and a Socialist Party under the centrist Prime Minister Manuel Valls.

Yet remarkably, Mr. Macron now finds himself almost alone in the wide open center ground…

Meanwhile the latest polls show Mr. Macron in what is effectively a statistical three-way heat to make the second round run-off on May 7 with Mr. Fillon and the far-right leader of the National Front, Marine Le Pen.

These polls also suggest that Mr. Macron would currently decisively beat either of them. Since then, Mr. Fillon’s candidacy has been convulsed by a scandal over his alleged use of public money to employ his wife and children. Not surprisingly, bookmakers now make Mr. Macron the clear favorite to win.

Even so, Mr. Macron still has work to do. His challenge rests on two bold claims: that he can reform France and that he reform Europe. His credentials as a reformer are not in doubt.

He has built an impressive grass roots campaigning organization, En Marche, which this week hit 170,000 supporters and which he now says will field candidates in the June elections for the National Assembly…**


#3

For more info:

wsj.com/articles/outsider-gains-ground-in-french-presidential-race-1485984099

**Outsider Gains Ground in French Presidential Race

Pro-European candidate Emmanuel Macron climbs in opinion polls as rivals take a harder line

As recently as December, you could get odds of 16:1 on Emmanuel Macron winning the French presidency. Most pundits were convinced that the 39 year-old former economy minister, who quit President Francois Hollande’s government to run as an independent candidate, stood little chance.

At a time when European voters are embracing anti-austerity, euroskeptic populist parties, Mr. Macron is an unabashed pro-European and enthusiast for liberal market reform.

He has never held elected office, has no national party organization behind him, and seemed doomed to end up competing for the crowded center ground against a Republican party led by the centrist Alain Juppé and a Socialist Party under the centrist Prime Minister Manuel Valls.

Yet remarkably, Mr. Macron now finds himself almost alone in the wide open center ground…

Meanwhile the latest polls show Mr. Macron in what is effectively a statistical three-way heat to make the second round run-off on May 7 with Mr. Fillon and the far-right leader of the National Front, Marine Le Pen.

These polls also suggest that Mr. Macron would currently decisively beat either of them. Since then, Mr. Fillon’s candidacy has been convulsed by a scandal over his alleged use of public money to employ his wife and children. Not surprisingly, bookmakers now make Mr. Macron the clear favorite to win.

Even so, Mr. Macron still has work to do. His challenge rests on two bold claims: that he can reform France and that he reform Europe. His credentials as a reformer are not in doubt.

He has built an impressive grass roots campaigning organization, En Marche, which this week hit 170,000 supporters and which he now says will field candidates in the June elections for the National Assembly…**


#4

Wonderful news - I heard him speak last week. Brilliant delivery, focussed and compelling in his arguments. If only more politicians had such integrity. And, as Mrs Merton would say, “very pleasing on the eye”!

tse1.mm.bing.net/th?&id=OIP.Ma0e6e31101495b04976b0068e1a4782ao2&w=300&h=200&c=0&pid=1.9&rs=0&p=0&r=0


#5

While I do support any member of the EU having the right to withdraw, I still think the EU is good for Europe.


#6

I’ve had my eye on him since last October - but not in that way obviously :smiley:

I’ve been hoping - and praying - that he would rise up in the polls.


#7

:thumbsup:

Amen.

I also support the constitutional right of Member States to secede from the EU, as does the EU itself through Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty.

But, like yourself, I regard the EU as ultimately good for Europe.


#8

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