Man Overboard [Manliness is what is wrong with Bush]


#1

By Ruth Marcus
Tuesday, March 21, 2006; A17

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/40028000/jpg/_40028839_crawford_203ap.jpgI have a new theory about what’s behind everything that’s wrong with the Bush administration: manliness.

“Manliness” is the unapologetic title of a new book by Harvey C. Mansfield, a conservative professor of government at Harvard University, which makes him a species as rare as a dissenting voice in the Bush White House. Mansfield’s thesis is that manliness, which he sums up as “confidence in the face of risk,” is a misunderstood and unappreciated attribute.

Manliness, he writes, “seeks and welcomes drama and prefers times of war, conflict, and risk.” It entails assertiveness, even stubbornness, and craves power and action. It explains why men, naturally inclined to assert that “our policy, our party, our regime is superior,” dominate in the political sphere.

washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/20/AR2006032001416_pf.html


#2

An article by a woman castigating Bush for being ---- GASP! ---- a man! Hey, we could do with more real men, not less. And I think America feels that way too–at least it did when deciding between wimpy Kerry and manly GWB! And now that Bush is still doing what he said he’d do, all the old ladies of both sexes are afraid–of what they don’t even know. His popularity has dropped because people no longer want a real man in office. How sad and how silly, just from my womanly point of view. :wink:


#3

Mansfield writes that he wants to “convince skeptical readers – above all, educated women” – that “irrational manliness deserves to be endorsed by reason.” Sorry, professor: You lose. What this country could use is a little less manliness – and a little more of what you would describe as womanly qualities: restraint, introspection, a desire for consensus, maybe even a touch of self-doubt.

But that’s just my view.

She sounds manly here?


#4

Nothing wrong with “manly”, however I wish one of his PR guys would tell him not to walk with his arms out from his sides like a bodybuilder walking on stage.

He looks like a little like Billy the Kid challenging someone to a gunfight on the streets of Dodge City over a poker game.


#5

Manliness? I’ve heard people say that about him (generally I’ve heard it from men).


#6

[quote=Della]An article by a woman castigating Bush for being ---- GASP! ---- a man! Hey, we could do with more real men, not less. And I think America feels that way too–at least it did when deciding between wimpy Kerry and manly GWB! And now that Bush is still doing what he said he’d do, all the old ladies of both sexes are afraid–of what they don’t even know. His popularity has dropped because people no longer want a real man in office. How sad and how silly, just from my womanly point of view. :wink:
[/quote]

good one. From Primal fear “Be a man”.


#7

What’s a real man? He’s not a bully or a wimp. He transcends his own ego, his own fears, his own selfishness, and sacrifices himself as a gift to those he’s called to protect.
By Dr. Philip J. Mango

saintmichael.net/index2.htm
(go to articles…The Firemen of 911and Masculinity)

:thumbsup:


#8

amazon.com/gp/product/0300106645/qid=1143076950/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/002-3483405-8412049?s=books&v=glance&n=283155

That is the link to Amazon for Mansfield’s new book, “Manliness” that is making the radical feminists apoplectic.

Manliness (Hardcover)
by Harvey C. Mansfield

(18 customer reviews)


#9

I was just thinking about this today. What is it that I can't stand about Obama? It is simply that he isn't a man, whereas Bush and most presidents before him (excepting Clinton and maybe Carter and maybe a couple others). I might disagree with many things that Bush did, but there is something about his character that I respected and even admired. He said what he believed, and did what he said. He was unapologetic about it. He accepted that he would be judged on his actions, good or bad. Obama on the other hand spends all his time politicizing everything. He still can't get past the rhetoric about the Bush administration. He is still using Bush as an excuse for any problems he might have. It is a popularity contest for him.

And I respect Bush for having basically disappeared after his time in office. He seems more of a man for it. Clinton and Carter though are constantly in the spotlight taking sides and giving their personal opinions. They would gain more respect, from me atleast, if they just went away.

Up until Clinton the presidents were all men, whether they were democrat or republican. There was a certain straight forward and honest character to their personality, and they knew how to get things done. It seems though that the Demoncrat party has become full of divas, and that is what they put up for election. Clinton and Obama are just divas. They are liers and they can't accept responsibility for their actions.

I am in the process of reading the book mentioned in the OP. It is an interesting explanation of the history of manliness.


#10

[quote="Mijoy2, post:4, topic:50263"]
Nothing wrong with "manly", however I wish one of his PR guys would tell him not to walk with his arms out from his sides like a bodybuilder walking on stage.

He looks like a little like Billy the Kid challenging someone to a gunfight on the streets of Dodge City over a poker game.

[/quote]

It might be natural. It's funny. When I was a skinny freshman in high school all the skinny (they were skinny back then) freshman boys affected that posture except the farm kids, who had it naturally. If you pumped iron in a serious way, by the time you were a senior that was just the way you were. I don't think a PR man could correct it for a lot of men.


#11

[quote="bones_IV, post:6, topic:50263"]
good one. From Primal fear "Be a man".

[/quote]

Or "You can act like a man!" from the Godfather.


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