Mantilla question

So I just ordered a small circular chapel veil, one that just sits on top of your head. Here is a link to the one I ordered: lh5.googleusercontent.com/-DYmaxTmvs6s/TY4aEXcZo9I/AAAAAAAAAho/5bk6osNcGLw/s1600/091.JPG . My question is, since I’ve never worn one, how do you keep it on your head? I have small children and I just want to know if there is a proper way to put is on your head so it stays on. Thank you very much.

Bobby Pins (hair pins)

Please consider joining our social group Veiled in Grace here on CAF. We are a group of women who cover our heads at Mass, and some full time.

God bless!
~Liza

A friend put me onto this trick: she attaches a small piece of Velcro (hook side) to the middle of her chapel veil (as we called the small circular veils in my day). The little hooks help it cling to my very straight, fine hair.

I know you ordered a small one for the top of your head, but… My wife tried that and found the little ones LOVED to try and pull it off. She switched to the long Jackie Kennedy style and ties it under her chin. This seems to work a lot better.

She always forgets bobby pins anyway. Just a suggestion.

In catholic grade school long ago it was bobby pins for the small chapel veil, we all thought it was grand

Holy Name school Houston alumi

The open bobby pins that look like this - not the closed ones.

Really!!?? How do you put the pin in? I’m thinking you must use it like how you would use a straight pin on fabric, sticking it in, grabbing some hair, then out again?

:shrug:

I use the closed hair pins and just pin the veil to my wide headband I usually wear to keep my bangs back out of my eyes. Never thought of using the open pins.

~Liza

Thanks all for the replies! I am new to wearing mantillas. I just ordered the longer triangular shaped ones in black and white for TLM. I also ordered small circular ones for NO mass as I dont want to be too distracting. Thanks! :slight_smile:

I don’t like having to mess with bobby pins, so I bought the Devorah headbands. All you have to do is put it on and it stays on your head without having to add anything. It’s super quick and easy.

http://www.headcoverings-by-devorah.com/images2/tn_BlackSheerHeadbandCovering.jpghttp://www.headcoverings-by-devorah.com/images5/tn_TanPolyCottonHeadband.jpg

Looks great. Does it tie in the back or is that elastic?

I wear the mantilla but I use a small barrette/clip or 2 to clip the veil in place one on the right and one the left side of my head. Hope that helps.:slight_smile:

I don’t think it would work for chapel caps, but the best way I’ve found to keep my veil on is to sew a wig clip on towards the front - keeps it totally secure. That way I don’t have to worry about bobby pins slipping out or tearing little holes in the lace, either.

Nope, there’s no tie. It’s just an elastic band, so you just slide it on your head.

Okay. I’d prefer a tie. Otherwise my hair will get all messed up.

:stuck_out_tongue:

I’ve never tried the chapel cap, I prefer a bit more covering than that type of covering gives but that is my choice. I do see it some times but the places I go for EF, most women prefer the mantilla or chapel veil.

I would just like to comment that in pre-Vatican II days, when women all were required to cover their heads at Mass, almost no one wore mantillas.

I grew up in the Northeast, and my husband grew up in the South. We compaired our recollections, and we agreed, no one wore mantillas.

If you saw them it was almost always on someone who was born somewhere in Europe, and even old foreign women seldom wore them.

Mostly all women wore hats, scarves, or veils (just netting with little pieces of velvet on them like little bows or balls), what was called “babushkas”( large and small scarves folded in a triangle and tied under the chin) were very popular.

Later when I was in high school the school requirement for chapel was the small round “chapel cap.”

Again, the mantilla thing is something novel and begun in recent times by people considering themselves “traditional,”** only mantillas were never a tradition in this country.**

And if we forgot our chapel veils, there was a nun at the door with a tissue and a bobby pin!! It was a sign of disrespect to go into church uncovered. :eek:

Mantillas became popular when Jackie Kennedy was First Lady.

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