Mantilla/veil??

Is it unheard of to have your veil blessed by a priest???
I have been drawn to this devotion and was thinking to get the veil blessed??
Thanks

Peace

If you feel that a blessing will help you by all means ask your priest to bless your head covering.

You are dedicating an aspect of your life to God, the head covering is an outward sign of this devotion, it is a sacramental to you.

Treat it with reverence, just as we treat all Holy things. Say a prayer with it (and kiss it tenderly) before you put it on.

I would suggest the Doxology:+ Glory to the Father, and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit… When I was young I was taught to do this with all sacramentals, such as the Bible before I opened it and after I closed it, also the cross I wear around my neck.

We do this for the greater Glory of God.

and i thought i was the only one who kissed my veil before putting it on. . . i felt led to do it, but still it seemed sort of strange, but do it anyway. . . i won’t feel so strange doing that any more. thank you.

I’ve been looking for a veil but haven’t found one. Where did you get your veils?

I have a neighbor/fellow parishioner who has one, but she said she got it from our church’s gift shop. I did not find any there (out of stock?) so I’m looking to alternative sources.

I’ve seen both black and white and as white seems to stand out so much (and I feel unworthy of white) I would like a black veil. Any sources for purchase?

I am glad someone started this thread because I have had a question about wearing veils at Mass. Why would one wear a veil??? I used to wear one when I was a little girl, but when Vatican II changed the Church law in regards to veils, we stopped wearing them.

Do you think all women should be still wearing them, or is this a private devotion you have in reverencing God? Don’t you get people looking at you unusually or staring at you? I am just trying to understand why one wears them, when the Holy Spirit has guided the Church in the laws she establishes and advises us on and she [the Church] has grown since that time to better understand our relationship with God. We are no longer held bound to wear the chapel veils.

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Don’t get me wrong, I respect those that still want to wear one, I just don’t understand the “drawing attention to themselves” in this way.*

I am glad someone started this thread because I have had a question about wearing veils at Mass. Why would one wear a veil??? I used to wear one when I was a little girl, but when Vatican II changed the Church law in regards to veils, we stopped wearing them.

I wear the veil for many reasons. I started shortly after my conversion from the Episcopal church, where I had been an avid supporter of feminist issues – my favorite t-shirt had been purple and read, “a woman’s place is in the house . . . of bishops.” Whilst in seminary, I began reading the Church Fathers seriously and, for once, began reading feminist literature with a critical eye in light of Scripture and Church tradition. As a result, I embraced Eastern Orthodoxy and renounced much of my feminist mind set, and, as an outward sign of that renunciation, I began to wear a veil. As I’ve continued wearing the veil, I found my relationship with my husband improved vastly and our household began to be ordered according to the calling and dignity of husband and wife. My experience of Holy Communion has grown as I’ve continued to wear the veil – I don’t think it to be accidental that St. Paul’s injunction to women in that regard immediately precedes his instructions on how the Holy Eucharist is to be celebrated in the community. (I Cor 11)
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Do you think all women should be still wearing them, or is this a private devotion you have in reverencing God?

It’s a private devotion, it’s not up to me to judge.

Don’t you get people looking at you unusually or staring at you?

Actually, when I started, it was in Orthodoxy and it was normative. Since coming home to the Catholic Church, the few times I feel self-conscious about it, I remember my old purple t-shirt and the controversy that stirred, and am grateful that I wear the veil now.

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I am just trying to understand why one wears them, when the Holy Spirit has guided the Church in the laws she establishes and advises us on and she [the Church] has grown since that time to better understand our relationship with God. We are no longer held bound to wear the chapel veils.

The church, to the best of my knowledge, has been silent on the issue – has not come out and said that veils are no longer required, nor has veiling been enforced. What a veil does for me, is to reinforce to me the dignity and unique vocation that I hold as a woman, wife, and mother. It’s not up to me to judge another. So, if one feels, so called toward that outward symbol, great; if not, great! I don’t always wear a veil to daily Mass – but usually do at the more formal Sunday and Holy Day Masses

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Since the Church is silent on the issue, I agree it is sad that one would feel shamed by not wearing the veil (or by wearing one, for that matter), but the veil itself is an act of worship, in that it is an obedience to Scripture, it is thanksgiving for our God-given dignity as women, and a sign of humility before our Lord.:twocents:

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[quote=JCPhoenix]I’ve been looking for a veil but haven’t found one. Where did you get your veils?
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It’s a matter of personal style; there are dozens of ways to tie a scarf that coordinates with your outfit – you can pick those up at any Wal- or K-mart. Search this forum under veil for web sites of veil and chapel cap providers. My personal favorite is a triangular white silk shawl with cute embroidered flowers around the edge, with fringe that I wear over my shoulders and pull up to cover my hair during the service itself. Several younger women I know, go for the 60’s throwback of a pill box hat with a small veil. Fabric stores sell lace by the yard – you can even design your own mantilla for very litte effort and $$.

Thank you everyone.

I have long wondered about this. I always wore a hat or scarf growing up. It took many years after Vatican II to give up wearing a head covering. A young exchange student that chose us from of photo many years ago, told me his decision was based on my head covering in the photo. I’m grateful to God for sending him to us and our continued friendship. :tiphat:

[quote=JCPhoenix]I’ve been looking for a veil but haven’t found one. Where did you get your veils?

I have a neighbor/fellow parishioner who has one, but she said she got it from our church’s gift shop. I did not find any there (out of stock?) so I’m looking to alternative sources.

I’ve seen both black and white and as white seems to stand out so much (and I feel unworthy of white) I would like a black veil. Any sources for purchase?
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Hey…

Check out www.halo-works.com. Thats where I got my veil…nice stuff!:slight_smile:

[quote=Khoria Anna]It’s a matter of personal style; there are dozens of ways to tie a scarf that coordinates with your outfit – you can pick those up at any Wal- or K-mart. Search this forum under veil for web sites of veil and chapel cap providers. My personal favorite is a triangular white silk shawl with cute embroidered flowers around the edge, with fringe that I wear over my shoulders and pull up to cover my hair during the service itself. Several younger women I know, go for the 60’s throwback of a pill box hat with a small veil. Fabric stores sell lace by the yard – you can even design your own mantilla for very litte effort and $$.
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Another thread mentioned this - my question is do you tie the scarf around your neck or will it stay on your head just draped over without the use of pins or tying? Sorry to get so detailed…but info would be appreciated! :slight_smile:

I haven’t felt called to wear a veil or mantilla, while I have been led to genuflect before receiving, for example.

If I am ever led to do so, my mom still has a couple of her old ones that I could use. I think they are a beautiful sign.

If I ever saw a woman wearing one in a church I attend I think it would give me a sense of peace. As a sign it would tell me something about that person, about her humility and her understanding of her dignity.

[quote=Blood Rain]I haven’t felt called to wear a veil or mantilla, while I have been led to genuflect before receiving, for example.

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I wore a mantilla forty years ago and gave it up when the priests told us we didn’t have to anymore. I just don’t feel called to… There is a family in my parish who wear them and the odd thing about this family is that while they may have their heads covered,some of them are immodestly dressed… doesn’t seem to make any sense to me?:slight_smile:

That does seem pretty inconsistant. See, now if I saw that I would wonder why they did it at all. I guess I’ve seen women who appeared poised and gracious.

[quote=Blood Rain]I haven’t felt called to wear a veil or mantilla, …

… I think they are a beautiful sign.

If I ever saw a woman wearing one in a church I attend I think it would give me a sense of peace. As a sign it would tell me something about that person, about her humility and her understanding of her dignity.
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Here is where I am confused. :confused:

That’s exactly what I don’t feel when I see a woman wearing a veil. I do not feel that peace just by seeing a woman wearing a veil. In fact, I feel bothered, and am bothered that I feel bothered. :whacky:
Why should I care? She has a right to have that devotion and I understand and respect that. But it seems to me like she is trying to point out to everyone that she is this “holier than thou” person that everyone should be looking at, because that is what the veil seems to do. How can we judge her heart by what she has on her head? Does that mean other women without veils aren’t as humble or have dignity? In fact, isn’t it possible that some who do not wear the veil might be more humble than her? How do we know unless we get to know her heart and see Christ-like examples in her life? Is she not a sinner just like everyone else?

Forgive me everyone who wears a veil. I do not want to seem picky or single you out. Maybe I feel like this because I have relatives whose young adult daughters have started wearing the veils just recently and I have always felt that this family has always had an attitude like they are better or holier. Now it seems like they are going to show everyone that they are by drawing attention to themselves.

Thanks all for your patience in my concerns and questions.

[quote=Jennifer123]Another thread mentioned this - my question is do you tie the scarf around your neck or will it stay on your head just draped over without the use of pins or tying? Sorry to get so detailed…but info would be appreciated! :slight_smile:
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depends on the texture of your hair – mine (fine and straight) needs the help of a black springy barette or at least a bobbie pin, unless I tie it, either under my chin (ugh!) or pull the corners back and tie it at the nape of my neck under my hair or pull a corner back over the opposite shoulder and fix it with a brooch. Experiment and see what works best for you.

scaxter, I don’t know where to start but I’ll try.
About 10 years ago I experienced a conversion of heart. This was when finally had some Catholic formation and was introduced or re-introduced to various Catholic devotionals, and practices. As I indicated earlier, some I’ve been drawn to some and others not so much.

When I moved back to my home diocese and parish I have been accused of trying to appear pious because I genuflect before I recieve communion (this was before the new GRIM and all the “catechesis” that went with it.

This is frustrating to me because I can’t do anything right now. If I continue to genuflect I’m being uber-pious, disobediant, and probably a show-off. If I don’t, I’m disobediant to God because I feel He is the One who called to to do so (and I had to get over my pride and selfconsciousness because I might be doing something “different” than others. I should be thinking about God and God alone when I genuflect or when I’m on my way up in the communion line. Instead I’m thinking “is anyone watching me, , will it distract them, why do they care, why are they watching me anyhow?” and so on.

When I see someone performing a pious act I pretty much mentally ackowledge it and move on. I guess I’m comforted by such things because where I live now it’s rare and I know I’m not “alone”.

I guess I give the benefit of the doubt if see I things like this and hope the person is humble as well as devout. And I really think I can tell the difference between those who are trying to project and image and not walking the walk and those who are doing what they are called to do by God. And guess I don’t think those who don’t aren’t any less holy. They may not have been led to do particular pious acts or may not know about them.

For example, I would like to strike my breast during the Confiteor. But I dont’ know how. I know it’s not rocket sience but I know there is a right way. I feel like I should do this. And when I get over the self consciousness I will. If someone notices I don’t perform that gesture and thinks badly of me, they’ve sinned not me.

Finally, one of the things I like to do is stay after Mass and pray. The church where I live, no one does this so I have stopped. No one leaves early, either (a pastor 30-40 years ago mangade to bring that to a halt.) The primary church I attend (an hour away from where I live) a lot of people stay after. I don’t think I stand out. Also, many leave early. I do not look down on them. I know many may have less than legitimate reasons for doing so, but some do. I’ve been there. When I stay late I say a quick prayer for them and get on with my thanksgiving.

We can’t see hearts, so I try to be generous but I do resent that someone else’s judgementalism has resulted in me not doing something I believe was the right and reverent thing to do.

I can only speak from my experience. I hope what I descibed is helpful.

But it seems to me like she is trying to point out to everyone that she is this “holier than thou” person that everyone should be looking at, because that is what the veil seems to do. How can we judge her heart by what she has on her head?

Why judge? – believe me, you don’t want to see in my heart – unless you want to see gunk and junk – but it helps me, is a reminder to me that I need to clean out that gunk and junk and really need to work on it because I’m wearing an outward symbol. Personally, it helps me to live into the God-given dignity of womanhood and reminds me (somewhat painfully) of the feminist lie I was living earlier in my life. That part of me rears its ugly head from time to time, and the veil reminds me to keep it in check.

If it’s not your thing, OK! God’s given you your thing . . . do that as he directs. For example, some people have great devotion to the Little Flower, others just don’t get her, but are more attracted to Aquinas, for example. We all make up the same church, and each can be a witness and help to each other to grow in different ways.

I’m sorry if the veil comes off holier than thou – it’s not intentional – I don’t even wear it all the time, mostly on formal occasions, and I make it look kind of like a modest fashion statement to be discrete about it – but still, it’s a real sign to me (and to my husband) of who I am becoming in Christ, and I’d hate to have to stop because it proved to be a stumbling block for others. Perhaps for me, it’s just a crutch I need right now to heal in ways I need to heal, and I’ll leave it off entirely someday, who knows? But for right now, where I am in my life, I really need it.

Thanks for listening.

[quote=Khoria Anna]Why judge? – believe me, you don’t want to see in my heart – unless you want to see gunk and junk – but it helps me, is a reminder to me that I need to clean out that gunk and junk and really need to work on it because I’m wearing an outward symbol. Personally, it helps me to live into the God-given dignity of womanhood and reminds me (somewhat painfully) of the feminist lie I was living earlier in my life. That part of me rears its ugly head from time to time, and the veil reminds me to keep it in check.

If it’s not your thing, OK! God’s given you your thing . . . do that as he directs. For example, some people have great devotion to the Little Flower, others just don’t get her, but are more attracted to Aquinas, for example. We all make up the same church, and each can be a witness and help to each other to grow in different ways.

I’m sorry if the veil comes off holier than thou – it’s not intentional – I don’t even wear it all the time, mostly on formal occasions, and I make it look kind of like a modest fashion statement to be discrete about it – but still, it’s a real sign to me (and to my husband) of who I am becoming in Christ, and I’d hate to have to stop because it proved to be a stumbling block for others. Perhaps for me, it’s just a crutch I need right now to heal in ways I need to heal, and I’ll leave it off entirely someday, who knows? But for right now, where I am in my life, I really need it.

Thanks for listening.
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That’s exactly what I am trying to say. One of the posts above said that just because a woman wears a veil reveals her humility and dignity. I am asking, “How can she make that judgement because of a veil?”

Anyway…you all have been so kind and respectful with your words and explanations as to why you wear a veil. Thank you. It is* your kind words* that have helped me come to realize your peace and humility–not what you have on your head, but I respect your choice of devotion.

[quote=scaxter]That’s exactly what I am trying to say. One of the posts above said that just because a woman wears a veil reveals her humility and dignity. I am asking, “How can she make that judgement because of a veil?”

Anyway…you all have been so kind and respectful with your words and explanations as to why you wear a veil. Thank you. It is* your kind words* that have helped me come to realize your peace and humility–not what you have on your head, but I respect your choice of devotion.
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I don’t think that all judgements are bad - I know Jesus said “judge not” but he meant keep from making judgements without knowing facts. How else to know good from bad if judgements can’t be made?

The veil I think is supposed to “show or signify” reverence for humility and the woman wearing it may have seemed dignified, so the poster made their judgement based on that. But without knowing what’s in this woman’s heart, you can’t really know for sure what her message may have been with the veil-wearing. I think you can judge as to what this woman may be trying to “say” by wearing a veil, but if this woman isn’t interiorly (is that a word??) harboring humility and dignity then it would be her sin, and that’s a cause for our pity. We’re always supposed to expect the best from people in the name of charity rather than jump to bad conclusions about people and their actions, just a reminder than I too need on occasion!! :wink:

But I don’t think it’s up for us to judge, one way or another, we should just acknowledge it for what it is - a sign of a devotion. I know I try to do pious acts at Church during Mass for my own growth, but also a little bit to try to bring back reverence for the Mass in other people. You may think that’s “holier than thou” but I don’t judge people for not being reverent, as maybe they weren’t raised to be reverent, they don’t know why to be reverent, I have no idea. But if I can get them thinking about what I’m doing, why I’m doing it, maybe they’ll check it out for themselves and wil be drawn to giving more reverence for the Eucharist, etc. Or maybe they’ll judge me for being pious in a bad way, but that’s their problem, not mine, and God knows my heart so that’s all I’m concerned about.

Hopefully that didn’t sound harsh, I’m just trying to explain, although I admit probably not in the best way, to help you understand what may make people seem outwardly pious. :slight_smile: Hope I make sense!! :thumbsup:

[quote=Jennifer123]I don’t think that all judgements are bad - I know Jesus said “judge not” but he meant keep from making judgements without knowing facts. How else to know good from bad if judgements can’t be made?

The veil I think is supposed to “show or signify” reverence for humility and the woman wearing it may have seemed dignified, so the poster made their judgement based on that. But without knowing what’s in this woman’s heart, you can’t really know for sure what her message may have been with the veil-wearing. I think you can judge as to what this woman may be trying to “say” by wearing a veil, but if this woman isn’t interiorly (is that a word??) harboring humility and dignity then it would be her sin, and that’s a cause for our pity. We’re always supposed to expect the best from people in the name of charity rather than jump to bad conclusions about people and their actions, just a reminder than I too need on occasion!! :wink:

But I don’t think it’s up for us to judge, one way or another, we should just acknowledge it for what it is - a sign of a devotion. I know I try to do pious acts at Church during Mass for my own growth, but also a little bit to try to bring back reverence for the Mass in other people. You may think that’s “holier than thou” but I don’t judge people for not being reverent, as maybe they weren’t raised to be reverent, they don’t know why to be reverent, I have no idea. But if I can get them thinking about what I’m doing, why I’m doing it, maybe they’ll check it out for themselves and wil be drawn to giving more reverence for the Eucharist, etc. Or maybe they’ll judge me for being pious in a bad way, but that’s their problem, not mine, and God knows my heart so that’s all I’m concerned about.

Hopefully that didn’t sound harsh, I’m just trying to explain, although I admit probably not in the best way, to help you understand what may make people seem outwardly pious. :slight_smile: Hope I make sense!! :thumbsup:
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Of course you made sense, Jennifer123. I just need to calm my bothered feelings down about this, and take it as a simple devotion some women choose in reverencing God. So be it. I should be glad that there are women like that vs. the opposite kind of woman who may not care at all about devotion and reverence.

Thanks.

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