Many thigns I do not understand

Forgive me for my ignorence and my small brain, please. lol

i was wandering if someone could explan how in baptisim, we are washed of orginal sin, yet its effects still remain? I

When we are confessign venial sins, hwo much detail shound go into it? Shound you always confess all the venial sins you can?

I read somewhre that if you forget to confess a mortal sin, you must confess it the next time you go…if thats true, are you still in the state fo a mortal sin?

In that same article, it said that you confess your sins so a priest can shook to frogive or “retain”, can I priest refuse to obsolve someone?

Some people think John the Baptist was clensed of orginal sin when he lept in the womb, is that thoery parwell to baptisim, ro not?

[quote=Emly]Forgive me for my ignorence and my small brain, please. lol

i was wandering if someone could explan how in baptisim, we are washed of orginal sin, yet its effects still remain? I

When we are confessign venial sins, hwo much detail shound go into it? Shound you always confess all the venial sins you can?

I read somewhre that if you forget to confess a mortal sin, you must confess it the next time you go…if thats true, are you still in the state fo a mortal sin?

In that same article, it said that you confess your sins so a priest can shook to frogive or “retain”, can I priest refuse to obsolve someone?

Some people think John the Baptist was clensed of orginal sin when he lept in the womb, is that thoery parwell to baptisim, ro not?
[/quote]

#1- Although we have been given new life in baptism and forgiven of original sins, we still have the frailties and human weaknesses as we did before our baptism. We are likely to struggle sometimes in our journey towards God, so in His mercy He gives us this sacrament to help us get back up when we fall from God’s grace.

#2- Venial sins do not have to be confessed however it is a good and pious act to confess them. As far as being detailed you don’t have to be too detailed. If there’s a doubt of if something is mortal and venial you can always confess it anyways. Venial sins can also be forgiven through the use of Holy Water, during the Penitential Rite at Mass(I confess to Almighty God… Lord Have Mercy), and through receiving the Eucharist. Mortal sins can only be forgiven through confession.

#3- If you honestly forget a mortal sin in confession that you intended to confess, you have to confess it the next time. You are not in a state of mortal sin because you accidently did not confess the sin and you can still receive the Eucharist. If you do not confess a mortal sin on purpose in the confessional that in itself is a mortal sin and needs to be confessed.

#4- A priest can only withhold absolution if he has reason to believe the person is not truely sorry for their sins. This is up to the discretion of the priest.

For the last question, I’m don’t completely understand, but when we are baptized we are cleansed and forgiven of our sins so it would be the same thing that happened to the St. John the Baptist when he was filled with the Holy Spirit in his mother’s womb.

Hope this helped.

God Bless,
Matt

Only enough to allow the priest to be able to judge the nature and gravity. Something you think is minor might be major.

If you go often to confession, then you should also be working to overcome your faults, and this cannot be done all at once.

You should focus on an area you are trying to overcome. Divide and conquer. They can often be grouped together.

If you honestly forgot, then it is forgiven under the condition that you mention it the next time. But you may receive Holy Communion in the meantime.

Yes.

He is not the only one sanctified in the womb. Jeremiah the prophet was also sanctified in the womb. Baptism and circumcision were obviously not performed for that.

hurst

[quote=Emly]Forgive me for my ignorence and my small brain, please. lol

i was wandering if someone could explan how in baptisim, we are washed of orginal sin, yet its effects still remain? I

When we are confessign venial sins, how much detail shound go into it? Shound you always confess all the venial sins you can?

I read somewhre that if you forget to confess a mortal sin, you must confess it the next time you go…if thats true, are you still in the state fo a mortal sin?

In that same article, it said that you confess your sins so a priest can shook to frogive or “retain”, can I priest refuse to obsolve someone?

Some people think John the Baptist was clensed of orginal sin when he lept in the womb, is that thoery parwell to baptisim, ro not?
[/quote]

Dear Emily,
(my Emily is a Math teacher),
When Polio was the blight of childhood, it was nearly always fatal. But, those that were healed of it nevertheless spend the rest of their lives on leg braces and crutches.
Polio was gone, the effects remained.
Further, Original Sin is a sign of privation of Sanctifying Grace…a participation in the Life of God in the Holy Spirit and making our good works done under that Grace meritorious in God’s eyes as we are now His own children…His Life now being IN us.
The damage to the human nature (the second part of Original Sin) remains…the propensity to sin, and the human sufferings in the body.
Removing Original Sin is meant for the eternal part of the human…their soul. It also illustrates how important God sees the Soul above the mere material body (the flesh profits nothing) which He promises to restore and renew in all its possible perfections in the next life, not this one.

All sins should be confessed in confession. Forgotten mortal & venial sins are forgiven when we include in our confession: “For these and all the sins of my past which I may not now remember, I am sorry.”

No sin need be described beyond making it clear what type of sin it was, and your consent to it, or any mitigating circumstance.

The Church has always taught that Mortal sin can be forgiven outside of confession as long as repentence or sorrow includes a firm intent to confess as soon a possible.
Mortal Sins unintentionally forgotten in confession are forgiven, but we are not to receive Holy Communion if it should occur to our mind, until another confession.

A priest can refuse absolving if his judgement demands it. However you must be so informed just as you must be informed of absolution.

John was cleansed of Original Sin in the Womb at the meeting of Christ’s Mother. That is, the life of Christ (in the Holy Spirit) entered his soul by Sanctifying Grace.

All Sanctifying Grace benefits before the Passion (Our Lord’s actual payment for them) were given “on credit” God knowing that they would be paid in the future.
Human example:
We can buy a car with cash today OR we can receive the car with a promise to pay for it in 1 year by signing a promissory note.

Hope this helps.
ps. Are you Catholic? I was assuming you are.

To all posters:
It seems that there is a variance on receving Holy Communion AFTER we realize that we omitted a Mortal Sin in Confession.
In light of this, we should seek a higher authority. In the meantime, since Communion is not a constant necessity, one should err on the side of pius humility and make only a spiritual Communion.
IMHO

[quote=TNT]The Church has always taught that Mortal sin can be forgiven outside of confession as long as repentence or sorrow includes a firm intent to confess as soon a possible.
[/quote]

For a fuller understanding the following is said in the CCC about contrition:
1452 When it(contrition) arises from a love by which God is loved above all else, contrition is called “perfect” (contrition of charity). Such contrition remits venial sins; it also obtains forgiveness of mortal sins if it includes the firm resolution to have recourse to sacramental confession as soon as possible.

Mortal Sins unintentionally forgotten in confession are forgiven, but we are not to receive Holy Communion if it should occur to our mind, until another confession.

If you remember an unintentionally forgotten mortal sin in confession you may receive Communion in the meantime until you go to confession next time where the sin should be confessed.

Please see the following post:
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=69901&highlight=confession

[quote=marty1818]…
If you remember an unintentionally forgotten mortal sin in confession you may receive Communion in the meantime until you go to confession next time where the sin should be confessed.

Please see the following post:
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=69901&highlight=confession
[/quote]

From your reference:

Yes, you may receive Holy Communion without going to Confession again. This is because the sin has been forgiven in a past Confession since you did not deliberately hold it back. But the next time you go to Confession you need to acknowledge the sin as an expression of your sorrow and repentance.

Fr. Vincent Serpa, O.P.

That’s all well and good. But Serpa does not reference any Church documents.
I’m not denying it, but I do not go to Communion if I’m in that condition, until Confession. Communion is NOT a constant necessity.
A document would be nice.
It seems strange he does not reference one.
Maybe he did not think of it.

A Catholic in a State of Mortal Sin Must Not Receive Communion:
“ANYONE WHO IS AWARE OF HAVING COMMITED A MORTAL SIN MUST NOT RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, even if he experiences deep contrition, without having first received sacramental absolution, unless he has a grave reason for receiving Communion and there is no possibility of going to confession” (Paragraph 1457 of the Catechism of the Catholic Church; emphasis added).
**–The Church charges anyone who has not yet received confession for a mortal sin to abstain from the Eucharist.
**There is no doubt that one is in the state of Grace, but so is one who had a perfect contrition for a mortal sin prior to confession. Yet that does not dispose them to receive Holy Communion.

[quote=TNT]From your reference:

That’s all well and good. But Serpa does not reference any Church documents.
I’m not denying it, but I do not go to Communion if I’m in that condition, until Confession. Communion is NOT a constant necessity.
A document would be nice.

[/quote]

Would the baltimore catechism suffice?

Q. 793. Is our Confession worthy if, without our fault, we forget to confess a mortal sin?

A. If without our fault we forget to confess a mortal sin, our Confession is worthy, and the sin is forgiven; but it must be told in Confession if it again comes to our mind.

Q. 794. May a person who has forgotten to tell a mortal sin in confession go to Holy Communion before going again to confession?

A. A person who has forgotten to tell a mortal sin in confession may go to communion before again going to confession, because the forgotten sin was forgiven with those confessed, and the confession was good and worthy.

Baltimore Catechism #3

What you are saying above is true, but not relevant to the issue, which is about having forgotten a sin in your last confession, and then remembering it afterwards.

hurst

[quote=Emly]Forgive me for my ignorence and my small brain, please. lol

i was wandering if someone could explan how in baptisim, we are washed of orginal sin, yet its effects still remain? I

When we are confessign venial sins, hwo much detail shound go into it? Shound you always confess all the venial sins you can?

I read somewhre that if you forget to confess a mortal sin, you must confess it the next time you go…if thats true, are you still in the state fo a mortal sin?

In that same article, it said that you confess your sins so a priest can shook to frogive or “retain”, can I priest refuse to obsolve someone?

Some people think John the Baptist was clensed of orginal sin when he lept in the womb, is that thoery parwell to baptisim, ro not?
[/quote]

If someone has time, I think it would be appropriate to explain concupiscence.

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