Map of the world by Catholic Rite

Hi there, does anyone know if there is any geographical map that delinates the traditional territory/jurisdiction of the various Catholic Churches? This would greatly assist me in grasping where each Church and Rite is practiced. (I am a very visual person, and it’s hard to associate the names with places, without seeing the places on a map) :o

Thanks!

I don’t know, but I hear you, it would be helpful to see on a map (although you understand there’s a lot of mixing of rites, right?) Anyhow, I thought you might like this. :stuck_out_tongue:

Very nice! I have often thought of making my own guitars one day - I’ll have to keep this one in mind, should I ever build a Strat! :thumbsup:

I know there’s not going to be a precise map of everything, but I hope there might be some resource that shows where the traditional territories were (or are). In my imagination I can see a color-coded map like what we used to see in high school that has some areas as solid, other areas with diagonal striping (representing areas of mixed populations, etc. I mean, if they can do that for such things as race and ethnicity, why not for Catholic populations? I’m sure the Vatican has all the info that would be needed somewhere…

on a side note - how’s the weather in LA? it’s been roasting here in the valley! :tanning:

If I could make one for you I would, but I have no talent for it. I can show you a few items by map and attempt to put them in context.

The Byzantine Rites of the Catholic church and the Orthodox church pretty much derive from the missions of Ss Cyril and Methodios. They were sent by Saint Photios to the Moravian kingdom to establish Christianity in pagan central Europe on the invitiation of king Svatopluk. Some people think this is the Moravia of today, a section of the Czech Republic, but actually it was a very large, but unstable kingdom. The file is too large, see here

Most of this region is actually Latin Catholic today, because the kingdom broke up under pressure from the Franks and then a process of assimilation into the Latin church was underway. The close followers of Cyril and Methodios then fled to the Bulgarian kingdom (which then included Romania) and their version of Byzantine-Slavic liturgy spread to the rest of Eastern Europe. By the way, Cyril and Methodios are still remembered in most of these Latin Catholic countries as their original evangelists.

The following is the region of Romania that the Romanian Catholic church derives from. It was once the eastern region of the Hungarian Kingdom.

http://www.gracegalleries.com/images/EU/EU127.jpg

Along the northern rim of the Transylvania map is the region the Ruthenian Catholics (BCC) derive from, this is along the Carpathian mountain range. It is present day Ukraine and Slovakia (with a little bit of southern Poland) but these areas were also in the Hungarian kingdom at the time of the Union of Uzhorod (beginning 1646AD). Many call themselves Rusyn to this day but many others have assimilated into the other prevailing cultures of Slovak, Ukrainian and Polish. The file for that image is too large, so see here

BTW, Pope John Paul II, of blessed memory, had a ‘Rusin’ mother. He was 50% Polish.

So that’s two! :smiley:

Yeah, it just started roasting here in the Valley, too. But its been a pretty mild summer so far. :thumbsup:

If I could make a map for you I would, but I have no talent for it. I can show you a few items by map and attempt to put them in context.

The Byzantine Rites of the Catholic church and the Orthodox church pretty much derive from the missions of Ss Cyril and Methodios. They were sent by Saint Photios to the Moravian kingdom to establish Christianity in pagan central Europe on the invitiation of king Svatopluk. Some people think this is the Moravia of today, a section of the Czech Republic, but actually it was a very large, but unstable kingdom. The file is too large, see here

Most of this region is actually Latin Catholic today, because the kingdom broke up under pressure from the Franks and then a process of assimilation into the Latin church was underway. The close followers of Cyril and Methodios then fled to the Bulgarian kingdom (which then included Romania) and their version of Byzantine-Slavic liturgy spread to the rest of Eastern Europe. By the way, Cyril and Methodios are still remembered in most of these once eastern rite Latin Catholic countries as their original evangelists.

The following is the region of Romania that the Romanian Catholic church (founded 1698AD) derives from. It was once the eastern region of the Hungarian Kingdom.

http://www.gracegalleries.com/images/EU/EU127.jpg

Along the northern rim of the Transylvania map is the region the Ruthenian Catholics (BCC) derive from, this is along the Carpathian mountain range. It is present day Ukraine and Slovakia (with a little bit of southern Poland) but these areas were also in the Hungarian kingdom at the time of the Union of Uzhorod (beginning 1646AD). Many call themselves Rusyn to this day but many others have assimilated into the other prevailing cultures of Slovak, Ukrainian and Polish. The file for that image is too large, so see here

BTW, Pope John Paul II, of blessed memory, had a ‘Rusin’ mother. He was 50% Polish.

So that’s two! :smiley:

If I could make a map for you I would, but I have no talent for it. I can show you a few items by map and attempt to put them in context.

The Byzantine-Slavonic Rites of the Catholic church and the Orthodox church pretty much derive from the missions of Ss Cyril and Methodios. They were sent by Saint Photios to the Moravian kingdom to establish Christianity in pagan central Europe on the invitiation of king Svatopluk. Some people think this is the Moravia of today, a section of the Czech Republic, but actually it was a very large, but unstable kingdom. The file is too large, see here

Most of this region is actually Latin Catholic today, because the kingdom broke up under pressure from the Franks and then a process of assimilation into the Latin church was underway. The close followers of Cyril and Methodios then fled to the Bulgarian kingdom (which then included Romania) and their version of Byzantine-Slavic liturgy spread to the rest of Eastern Europe. By the way, Cyril and Methodios are still remembered in most of these once eastern rite Latin Catholic countries as their original evangelists.

The following is the region of Romania that the Romanian Catholic church (founded 1698AD) derives from. It was once the eastern region of the Hungarian Kingdom.

http://www.gracegalleries.com/images/EU/EU127.jpg

Along the northern rim of the Transylvania map is the region the Ruthenian Catholics (BCC) derive from, this is along the Carpathian mountain range. It is present day Ukraine and Slovakia (with a little bit of southern Poland) but these areas were also in the Hungarian kingdom at the time of the Union of Uzhorod (beginning 1646AD). Many call themselves Rusyn to this day but many others have assimilated into the other prevailing cultures of Slovak, Ukrainian and Polish. The file for that image is too large, so see here

BTW, Pope John Paul II, of blessed memory, had a ‘Rusin’ mother. He was 50% Polish.

So that’s two! :smiley:

A slight correction to my previous post.

The last link was supposed to be an image of the Carpatho-Rusyn homeland, but it is somewhat absurd. It contains two counties of Ung, so the interior boundaries are obviously incorrect.

This map works better, I think. It superimposes the area of residence for the Rusyn people over boundaries of the modern nations in place. The area should be easy to identify on a modern map of Europe.

http://www.c-rs.org/crs_map.jpg

Thanks for the maps, Hesychios :smiley:

Since so many of the Eastern Churches correlate to specific groups of people - Syrians, Greeks, Ukrainians, Russians, Polish, Czech, etc, is it safe to say that in general the areas that each Church covers correspond to modern national boundaries (although I see that the original area of the Ruthenian Church spans several modern-day countries). But, in the present day, do the Church boundaries correspond to current borders?

Actually no, I don’t think it is safe to generalize.

For instance, the Syro-Malabar church (and also the Syro-Malankara church) has just one province in India, which is Kerala. This may be because India was consolidated into one nation in modern times and the Vatican chooses not to consider that as relevant.

http://www.diocese-neyyattinkara.net/diocese/location/india_map_kerala.jpg

(the map is actually for a Latin diocese, but it’s a good indicator for Kerala)

The rest of India is basically covered by a network of Roman Catholic dioceses, and as much as the Syro-Malabar church might disagree it must rely on the Pope to elevate bishops for it in northern India. This is also true for the Syro-Malankara church.

(BTW, there is a unique community in India composed exclusively of Indians who claim descent from Jews, and they as a rule do not intermarry outside of their own community. These are the Southists, or Knanaya Christians. They will commonly marry across Orthodox-Catholic lines within their community but rarely marry within their own church outside of the community.)

The Melkite Church Patriarchate is entitled: Patriarch of Antioch and All the East, of Alexandria and Jerusalem. In the Orthodox community these are three Patriarchates, but these three are combined into one office for the Catholic Melkites. So the Melkite homeland covers several countries, where it overlaps with the territories of other eastern Catholic churches. (I am guessing Syria, Israel, Palestinian Authority, Jordan and Lebanon plus probably Egypt & Turkey). This is where the synod names it’s own bishops, the Melkites in America and Australia would be under bishops named by the Pope and subject to discipline designated by the Pope (such as celibacy of clergy, which was an issue for a while).

Since after Vatican Council II the designation of home territories is more significant for describing the limits of Papal responsibility, in the sense that whatever does not automatically fall under what the Vatican designates as home territory is assumed to be the prerogative of the Pope.

The Ruthenians (described above) actually do not have a home territory in that sense, because it is not recognized as one synod at all. It started out as subject to the Latin bishop of Egar in the Hungarian kingdom, and was later removed from that dependent relationship by some Pope. The Pope has named every bishop for them since, elevating new dioceses as he may deem necessary. (Among Byzantine Catholics there has been talk in the past that consolidation of BCC eparchies in the USA might be necessary due to shrinking enrollments, but Rome has never publicly said anything about that possibility that I am aware of.)

I just read an article about the Romanian Catholic church where it describes the bishop of Alba Iulia has recently been elevated to a Major-Metropolitanate by the Pope. This seems to put every other Byzantine-Rite bishop in the nation of Romania under his authority (an area bigger than the original region of Transylvania), but not the Romanian Catholic diocese of Canton, OH USA, which (although quite small) technically remains under the supervision of the Pope.

The Byzantine-Slavonic church in Trans-Carpathian Ukraine (Mukaèevo), is not part of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic church, having originally been in the Hungarian kingdom when it’s priests submitted to Rome (at Uzhorod). It’s bishop is named by the Pope.

Actually no, I don’t think it is safe to generalize.

For instance, the Syro-Malabar church (and also the Syro-Malankara church) seems to have just one province as home territory in India, which is Kerala. This may be because India was consolidated into one nation in modern times and the Vatican chooses not to consider that as relevant.

http://www.diocese-neyyattinkara.net/diocese/location/india_map_kerala.jpg

(the map is actually for a Latin diocese, but it’s a good indicator for Kerala)

The rest of India is basically covered by a network of Roman Catholic dioceses, and as much as the Syro-Malabar church might disagree it must rely on the Pope to elevate bishops for it in northern India. This is also true for the Syro-Malankara church.

(BTW, there is a unique community in India composed exclusively of Indians who claim descent from Jews, and they as a rule do not intermarry outside of their own community. These are the Southists, or Knanaya Christians. They will commonly marry across Orthodox-Catholic lines within their community but rarely marry within their own church outside of the community.)

The Melkite Church Patriarchate is entitled: Patriarch of Antioch and All the East, of Alexandria and Jerusalem. In the Orthodox community these are three Patriarchates, but these three are combined into one office for the Catholic Melkites. So the Melkite homeland covers several countries, where it overlaps with the territories of other eastern Catholic churches. (I am guessing Syria, Israel, Palestinian Authority, Jordan and Lebanon plus probably Egypt & Turkey). This is where the synod names it’s own bishops, the Melkites in America and Australia would be under bishops named by the Pope and subject to discipline designated by the Pope (such as celibacy of clergy, which was an issue for a while).

Since after Vatican Council II the designation of home territories is more significant for describing the limits of Papal responsibility, in the sense that whatever does not automatically fall under what the Vatican designates as home territory is assumed to be the prerogative of the Pope.

The Ruthenians (described above) actually do not have a home territory in that sense, because it is not recognized as one synod at all. It started out as subject to the Latin bishop of Egar in the Hungarian kingdom, and was later removed from that dependent relationship by some Pope. The Pope has named every bishop for them since, elevating new dioceses as he may deem necessary. (Among Byzantine Catholics there has been talk in the past that consolidation of BCC eparchies in the USA might be necessary due to shrinking enrollments, but Rome has never publicly said anything about that possibility that I am aware of.)

I just read an article about the Romanian Catholic church where it describes the bishop of Alba Iulia has recently been elevated to a Major-Metropolitanate by the Pope. This seems to put every other Byzantine-Rite bishop in the nation of Romania under his authority (an area bigger than the original region of Transylvania), but not the Romanian Catholic diocese of Canton, OH USA, which (although quite small) technically remains under the supervision of the Pope.

The Byzantine-Slavonic church in Trans-Carpathian Ukraine (Mukaèevo), is not part of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic church, having originally been in the Hungarian kingdom when it’s priests submitted to Rome (at Uzhorod). It’s bishop is named by the Pope.

I am open to correction about the statements I make here, if anyone has more accurate information to contribute.

katolsk.no/utenriks/index_en.htm

Wow!, after reading through some of the brief histories that are included on some of the Eastern Churches, making a single map would be next to impossible - it would have to be a series of maps that depicte chronological changes (and would probably have to be accompanied by much historical/political information in order for the viewer to understand the changes over time) Thanks for this reference!

Not a map, but a list of every Eastern Catholic Church and their respective eparchies including location.

cnewa.org/source-images/Roberson-eastcath-statistics/eastcatholic-stat08.pdf

Another great resource-thanks! This really helps me visualize the regions where each Church has jurisdiction (Didn’t realize they overlapped so much in the Holy Land and the Middle East!)

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