Marco Rubio: Everyone spies on everyone


#1

[LEFT]Sen. Marco Rubio dismissed the outrage from European leaders that the U.S. has been spying on them, saying, “everybody spies on everybody.”

“These leaders are responding to domestic pressures in their own countries, none of them are truly shocked about any of this,” Rubio (R-Fla.) said Friday on CNN’s “New Day.” “Everybody spies on everybody, I mean that’s just a fact.”

Read more: politico.com/story/2013/10/marco-rubio-nsa-spying-98840.html#ixzz2ilfqA0tr

true[/LEFT]


#2

The US should be blamed for letting a yahoo like Snowden run abroad with classified info, then letting him end up in asylum in Russia. Everyone spies; not everyone blunders with their personnel like we did. That’s the real problem.


#3

100% agree.


#4

Just because someone says something, it doesn’t prove it as factual.

The good senator should be able to provide corroborative evidence for the claims that he makes.


#5

Exactly.
The US has been spying on citizens since collecting copies of telegrams from Western Union. When Britain was the world superpower they made sure every telegram in the world had to go thru a British-owned or British-partnered cable.

What’s galling is that a private like Manning or a low-level contractor has access to do such damage. Perhaps because the government has contractors do their own background checks?


#6

Don’t hold your breath. Countries don’t admit to their spying unless they’re caught at it, and they don’t admit they know it’s being done to them either unless it otherwise becomes public.

If Rubio knows for absolute certain the Germans spy on the U.S. (and they’re incompetent if they don’t) he isn’t going to give you or anybody else chapter and verse on it.

So far, there is not a German Snowden. Their intelligence agency (and they do have one) is probably just less sloppy than ours.


#7

Disagree.
Countries admit they have been spied upon only when they have proof of said spying.

If the senator has evidence of the country being spied upon, I’ve no doubt said evidence would have been proffered.

The good senator should be able to provide corroborative evidence for the claims that he makes. That is if he has any corroborative evidence of course:D


#8

No offense, but in what world would any Senator be obliged to provide classified intel to satisfy you? He couldn’t care less what you or I think, nor should he. No one with a clearance is allowed to disclose this sort of thing anyway, which is precisely why the Snowden thing was a big deal. And you expect him to imitate Snowden and say “here’s classified info to prove my point…”

He was basically saying “here’s the deal. Everyone does this sort of thing. If you don’t believe me, I don’t really care. Next question.”


#9

So no one is allowed to disclose that spying is going on. Are you sure about that?


#10

[quote=Euwe] Quote:

Originally Posted by Darken Rahl

No offense, but in what world would any Senator be obliged to provide classified intel to satisfy you? He couldn’t care less what you or I think, nor should he. No one with a clearance is allowed to disclose this sort of thing anyway, which is precisely why the Snowden thing was a big deal. And you expect him to imitate Snowden and say “here’s classified info to prove my point…”

He was basically saying “here’s the deal. Everyone does this sort of thing. If you don’t believe me, I don’t really care. Next question.”

So no one is allowed to disclose that spying is going on. Are you sure about that?
[/quote]

Not if its classified or doesn’t serve any purpose to further interests.

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#11

Personally, I am tired of people like Senator Marco Rubio dismissing concerns like this. Our concerns are valid concerns and so is Europe’s concerns. The spying is justified if they are spying on people that they have a warrant from a judge that justifies them spying on someone but otherwise I do not feel that spying is justified. I feel that it is an unjust intrusion our right to privacy.


#12

I’m going to buy a telescope and watch the next store neighbors every move.
And when the cops come, I’ll just say “but officer, everybody spies on everybody”.
:rolleyes:


#13

Exactly! If the government can do it then every day citizens ought to be able to do it as well. But the fact is, the government should not spy on people without a warrant from a judge which authorizes it. Any other spying should be illegal in my opinion with the possible and likely exception of foreign terrorists. I am not sure if a judge can issue such a warrant for someone who is not an American citizen.


#14

It’s the top story on the BBC this morning. The way I see it is, bad news for the Obama administration, NSA, CIA, etc is Good news. It’s not like any of these people are even remotely worthy of our trust.


#15

Sorry, the Senator is simply stating reality. All countries intelligence agencies gather information on all countries they interact with so their leaders can understand other countries objectives and capabilities. Virtually ever person at every consulate and embassy in the world is sending back reports on contacts they have, comments made at meetings, in the press, various industry conferences, industry demonstration and at social events etc.

They all record meetings and telephone conversations. Many countries are using the internet for gathering intelligence/spying. Your guess as to which ones are doing it the most successfully.

Why do countries spy on their allies? Better understand movements within the country and try and predict future courses of action. Areas of potential cooperation or conflict-- information to support making the best deals we can, protect our interests while respecting theirs. Most successful agreements are where both sides gain something. Of course, today’s allies can be tomorrow’s opponents and vice-versa.


#16

I understand the concern and the feeling. It doesn’t seem right in a country in which the “right to privacy” seems only to apply to abortions and immigrant status.

But the way everything is all over the place electronically now, I’m not sure anything has been private for a long time. The more everything is linked together (and Obamacare is just another example of that) I don’t see how anybody can expect privacy from even the most junior grade of information thieves.

Sad as it may be, I think the privacy horse left the barn so long ago nobody even remembers what color it was.


#17

The BBC! From the country with the intelligence network second perhaps only to that of Israel. The Brits probably know exactly how many cigarettes both Obama and Boehner smoke in a day’s time, and are in possession of half the butts.


#18

Two thoughts:

  1. I can’t imagine how American lives will be saved by tapping Merkel’s phone.

  2. The issue is minor compared to the NSA’s spying on Americans.

Jon


#19

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