Maronite LOH Prayers


#1

I am a new Maronite! I was welcomed into the Maronite Church on March 17th of this year!
I know they have a Maronite Liturgy of the Hours distinct from the Roman Rite Liturgy of the Hours!
Does anyone know where I can get an English version of the Maronite Liturgy of the Hours?
Where can I learn how to pray it? I live in Massachusetts (USA)! Thanks!


#2

Congratulations, and welcome to the Maronite Church! I would start with your pastor, ask him for a copy of the “Prayer of the Faithful” books. There are three volumes for the entire liturgical year.

If he does not have any extra copies that you can use, you can order a set from the Eparchy of St. Maron at www.stmaron.org. You should also be able to download the ordo from that website or from the website of the eparchy of Our Lady of Lebanon.

There is actually a website that has the complete prayer of the faithful at http://www.maronitefaith.com/. It’s pretty easy and straightforward to use, you just have to be careful when the liturgical seasons are changing sometimes the week that loads automatically when you go to the homepage isn’t the week that you were supposed to be on.

If you have any questions about how to use it or any other Maronite questions please feel free to send me a PM!


#3

Occasionally the Prayer of the Faithful is available through Amazon as well - that’s where I got my copy. As XXI_4 (who is much better informed than I) mentioned, however, there’s a good chance that your pastor will have extra copies he’d be willing to pass along to you.

If you don’t want to start with the full 3-volume set, you might consider checking out the one volume Eyes of the Heart (I think that’s what it’s called).


#4

They call it a single volume, but it’s actually 2. The blue book is propers for Sundays only and only commons for weekdays, the green one is weekday propers, but it’s missing several seasons including the current season and season of the Holy Cross. And there is no synaxarion.

I don’t really like it. I use the normal books or the website I linked to above.


#5

Does each Eastern Catholic Church have its own LOTH? Or is there slight or major differences among them, or with the Latin?


#6

Hi Commenter.

There’s a couple of things you should know here. First, there is no “Eastern Catholic Church.” There are 23 or 24 Eastern Catholic Churches, each of which utilizes one of several liturgical/ritual traditions. So, for example, there are the Ukrainian Greek Catholic, the Melkite Greek Catholic, the Romanian Greek Catholic, and the Ruthenian Greek Catholic Churches. Each of these churches has its own clergy and hierarchy, and may have its own set of laws (they are churches sui iuris [i.e. self-governing]). Despite this, however, each of these churches utilize the Byzantine liturgical tradition, and were formed by/draw from the Byzantine spiritual and theological tradition.

Relevant to this thread, the Maronite Catholic Church is not Byzantine, but Syriac (even though we are somewhat unique within the Syriac tradition). We have our own liturgical tradition, our own hierarchy and clergy, our own spiritual and theological traditions, etc.

Each different liturgical tradition has its own Liturgy of the Hours. So, the Roman tradition has its own Liturgy of the Hours, the Byzantine tradition has its “Horologion” and other liturgical books for celebrating the Hours, the Maronite tradition has Shhimtho and other books needed for celebrating the Hours, the Coptic tradition has the Agpeya, etc.

The differences are actually very significant, even though the Psalms are typically the central feature of the LotH. The Byzantine tradition has a complex system of hymns and prayers woven around the Psalms. It is not formatted for private prayer, but for public prayer. And there is a book (called the “typica”) that governs which prayers and Psalms are sung, and which may be omitted. When the full service of “Morning Prayer” is celebrated in the Byzantine tradition, it can actually take several hours!

From what I’ve seen of translations of the Maronite Shhimtho directly from the Syriac text (and without abbreviations), the Psalm verses are typically alternated with brief hymns/prayers that expand or gloss on the verse and/or the feast of the day. However, in the current English translation in use throughout the U.S. (a translation from the French edition, which is a translation of the Arabic edition, which is a translation from the Syriac), the format was restructured and abbreviated to more closely reflect the Roman LotH and make it possible for use as a “private devotion.”


#7

Here is the outline for the Byzantine Catholic Church:

https://mci.archpitt.org/liturgy/DailyCycle.html

ZP


#8

You can find the official Morning and Evening prayer, Ramsho and Safro, at https://eparchy.org/liturgy. Unfortunately, they’re still to publish the 2019 version, but the current one is good through January 2019.


#9

Not only are we a bit hazy on the count, but we like it that way :rofl::roll_eyes::stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

A bit more seriously, last I read there is at least one (Georgian?) of which there was uncertainty as to whether it was extinct or not . . . and then there’s the issues of what/how to count, and . . .


#10

This topic was automatically closed 14 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.