Marriage Or Become a Nun


#1

I am not sure if this is where I would post this, but here we go. I am having trouble on deciding what my calling is in life. I am a twenty five year old woman, and am not married. Lately for the past year or so, I have been wondering if I am called to become a Nun. I have always dreamt of being married and having children of my own. I would love nothing more than to be a wife and raise children of my own and In God’s name. It just hasnt happened, yet. And I am not sure if it ever will. I am very close to God, and value my Catholic faith imensley. And, every once in a while I get the random thought in my head, that maybe I am to be a nun, that my relationship with the Lord is so precious that, that is what I am called to do. I know that I have my own plans of where I want my life to go, but it is His will and not mine that needs to be answered to. I just dont know what to do, and and what point do I start making action of my plans to either become a nun or be married. I know I am not really asking a question here. But, any thoughts or words of wisdom on this topic would be greatly appreciate. God Bless.


#2

I would try and check it out by finding a convent or convents you can visit and talk to the head prioress and spend some time there if possible.
My friend was in the same place as you were and this is what she did.


#3

I was in the same boat, somewhat. I started feeling a call to become a nun as a persistent, nagging thought that kept coming back (I wasn't even Catholic then).

Prague's advice is excellent. I've been in contact with several convents to get a feel for what they do for their community and whether I'd be a good "fit."

I'm an older widow and will not marry again, regardless of whether the religious life is God's calling for me.

Miz


#4

**Listen to Jesus in your heart!

Spend many hours in front of the Blessed Sacrament in Adoration.

Ask Jesus what He wants from you, not what you want, "It was not the dream i dreamed."**

Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora Pro Nobis Peccatoribus!

mark


#5

I was in your same position. I was 26 and unmarried. So I joined a convent. And I HATED IT. I was horny and miserable all the time. I knew what my true desire was (marriage and children), but the convent was just where "single Catholic women of a certain age" go.

After leaving like a bat out of Hell, I eventually the man I hope to marry. And he makes me very happy and I almost missed it if I stayed in the convent.

Anywho, i would follow your desire. The desire for a husband and children will not go away. God gave you that desire for a reason. And it wasnt to be celibate (IMO, celibacy is an impossible standard for a lifetime) and not have kids.


#6

OP, please be careful on discerning between responses.

[quote="CountrySinger, post:5, topic:211426"]
I was in your same position. I was 26 and unmarried. So I joined a convent. And I HATED IT. I was horny and miserable all the time. I knew what my true desire was (marriage and children), but the convent was just where "single Catholic women of a certain age" go.

After leaving like a bat out of Hell, I eventually the man I hope to marry. And he makes me very happy and I almost missed it if I stayed in the convent.

Anywho, i would follow your desire. The desire for a husband and children will not go away. God gave you that desire for a reason. And it wasnt to be celibate (IMO, celibacy is an impossible standard for a lifetime) and not have kids.

[/quote]

I mean this not to try and judge the person, but it is obvious through the statements made by this person and their signature that Catholicism is of the cafeteria-style here. The Church's views on celibacy are not in accord with those of this poster. Celibacy is a beautiful gift, and Matthew 19:1-12 helps sum it up, with Christ himself endorsing it. I guess you can decide where you put your trust. :p

You might also check out religious-vocation.com

Fr. Timothy Gallagher also has some great books, Discernment of Spirits and Discerning the Will of God, both of which might help you. Stay true to the Church, and don't fall prey to our pop. culture of relativism! My prayers will be with you. God Bless.


#7

[quote="CountrySinger, post:5, topic:211426"]
Anywho, i would follow your desire. The desire for a husband and children will not go away. God gave you that desire for a reason. And it wasnt to be celibate (IMO, celibacy is an impossible standard for a lifetime) and not have kids.

[/quote]

I don't think this is good advice... God isn't the origin of all desires. It is far too easy to say "God gave me this desire" as justicifation. God gives subtle hints, thoughts. But it takes discernment, lots of it. As someone else mentioned, it is the desire of God's will not our own will that is important. Once we follow God, our wills become clearer and less clouded, and we realise, if it was God's will, that what we are doing is best for us. Celibacy is not impossible either. It is difficult but many things worhtwhile for God's glory are difficult.


#8

In reference to my last post:

Let me again restate that I in no way meant to degrade, judge, or belittle the previous poster, but wanted to draw a clarification between personal opinions and church teachings.

OP, you will hear plenty of dissenting opinions, but there is only one place to go to know that what we are hearing is inspired truth, and that is through the Holy Father and the Magisterium. God be with you in your discernment.


#9

Many religious communities have days set aside specifically for prospective candidates to “check them out”. Most communities have websites, so it shouldn’t be too difficult to find one offering these special days.

Additionally, there would be no harm in discussing your situation with a Priest. He is often able to offer some significant insights into a religious vocation. Visiting a community, and speaking with the Superior or Director of Candidates can also be helpful in evaluating your situation.

Finally, and one of the many things which emerged from Vatican II, is the statement that the married life is a vocation in, and of itself. Don’t be afraid to pray. One poster suggested spending time with Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament. Great thought.

Praying that Our Lord, through the Holy Spirit will aid you in discerning your vocation.


#10

Hi friends,

Our monsignor gave us students a few good tips:

-many of the character traits that make a good spouse and parent are the same ones that make a good sister or priest. Cultivate those qualities and realize that there will probably always be at least a passing interest in the other vocation. He advises young pre-seminarians: "Which vocation would you miss more?"

-God often speaks to us through the people and communities around us. Talk to them! Ask questions! This also gives them a chance to love you more deeply by advising you. This really is a win-win situation.

-this is probably obvious, but pray. Receive the Sacraments, study Scripture, and be involved in your parish family.

-for us singles, he also told us "don't settle and get married to just anybody just because you're 30."


#11

Thank you all so very much for your suggestions and thoughts. I will take them all into concideration while I pray about what I am to do. I appreciate all of you. God Bless :)


#12

you can go stay with nuns to see if u like it or not i never spent time with any though i love nuns and i go to mass and prsayer alot i wont ever get married or have children


#13

You should watch this video of this young lady who became a nun. She talks about how she had a desire to be a nun but also to be a mother.

youtube.com/watch?v=lyltd1iWnaw


#14

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