Marriage


#1

My friend’s sister married their first cousin. Is this scriptual and or legal? They are all Roman Catholics.:confused::eek::confused:

How far down the blood line do you have to be to get married? Should’nt it be further than first cousins?:confused::mad::confused:


#2

The diocesan bishop is able to give a dispensation to allow first cousins to marry.


#3

I was under the impression that it had to be farther than second cousins. However, there are circumstances where you might be counsins and it is still OK. For example, let’s say Ted is 8 years old and his dad is dead. Fred is 9 years old and his mom is dead. Ted’s mom marries Fred’s dad. Ted and Fred become step brothers. Their children become cousins although Ted and Fred share no blood. Ted and Fred’s kids can marry


#4

My parents shared a grandmother. (1/2 first cousins??) They got a dispensation to marry back in 1952. I’ve looked at the pre-nup booklet for our diocese, it spells out the degrees of affinity and what can be dispensed. Since 1917, 4th degree affinity (first cousins) can be dispensed.

It’s a good thing dispensations can be granted since in small isolated communities it’s not rare for just about everyone to be related.


#5

Under the 1983 code of canon law the prohibited degree of **consanguinity **is the 4th degree, but it can be dispensed.

Degrees count each person in the line, and do not count the common ancestor. For example:

parents: common ancestor
children: first and second degree
first cousins: third and fourth degree

So, first cousins would need a dispensation to marry. This dispensation is not granted in places where civil law prohibits marriage of first cousins. But, in those places where it is legal, the Church will dispense from the impediment.


cmscms- your example is one of affinity, not consanguinity. Affinity is a relationship by marriage. Affinity is prohibited in the direct line.

Phemie-- Your example is consanguinity, not affinity.


#6

Can you please explain what affinity means? Does that mean my example is wrong. (I am not debating but curious to know)


#7

A relationship arising out of blood is consanguinity. A relationship arising out of marriage is affinity. They are different impediments. There is also the impediment of public propriety, which create relationships from concubinage (i.e. living together or having a sexual relationship with another) or invalid marriages.

In the example you gave, the relationship between Ted and Fred and their children is one of affinity, through the marriage of their parents they become related but not by blood. As another example, I am now related to all of my husband’s family by affinity.

Under older codes of canon law, there were *extensive *prohibitions against relationships arising out of affinity. For example, under older codes not only would I be related to my husband’s family but also all of my family would be related to his. So, my sister could not validly marry his brother, for example.

Today this is not the case. The impediment of affinity it is confined to the direct line, for example a step mother marrying her step son.


#8

[quote="1ke, post:7, topic:199295"]
A relationship arising out of blood is consanguinity. A relationship arising out of marriage is affinity. They are different impediments. There is also the impediment of public propriety, which create relationships from concubinage (i.e. living together or having a sexual relationship with another) or invalid marriages.

In the example you gave, the relationship between Ted and Fred and their children is one of affinity, through the marriage of their parents they become related but not by blood. As another example, I am now related to all of my husband's family by affinity.

Under older codes of canon law, there were *extensive *prohibitions against relationships arising out of affinity. For example, under older codes not only would I be related to my husband's family but also all of my family would be related to his. So, my sister could not validly marry his brother, for example.

Today this is not the case. The impediment of affinity it is confined to the direct line, for example a step mother marrying her step son.

[/quote]

Very confusing, but interesting. (smiles) Thanks for answering.:thumbsup::thumbsup:


#9

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