Martin luther on his deathbed


#1

A Catholic priest from once told me that Martin Luther requested to have a Catholic priest come to give him last rites at his deathbed, but that Melanchthon wouldn’t let him.

I neglected to ask the priest where he got this info. Does anyone here know anything about this and where I might get the source information on it?

Thanks.

Peter
Vancouver BC


#2

[quote=cpandersen]A Catholic priest from once told me that Martin Luther requested to have a Catholic priest come to give him last rites at his deathbed, but that Melanchthon wouldn’t let him.

I neglected to ask the priest where he got this info. Does anyone here know anything about this and where I might get the source information on it?

Thanks.

Peter
Vancouver BC
[/quote]

Not sure about that, but on his death bed he is reported to have said: “It is easier to live as a Protestant, but better to die as a Catholic.”

I was reading a book by one of the saints. I think it was St. Theresa of Avila. If you remember, she had been a luke-warm nun, until Our Lord showed her her place in hell. He actually took her to hell and showed her the place where she would go it she didn’t straighten up. Needless to say, she straightened up, and became a great saint.

I am pretty sure it was in one of her books where she made the following comment, which I persume was shown to her when she was taken to hell. She said this: “Luther and Calvin are in hell, and their torment increases with each person who is damned from one of their errors.”


#3

But isn’t it against church teaching to say explicitly who is in hell? Although I guess it was only a personal revelation… it’s not like we have to believe it anyway.


#4

A couple of such revelations involve the recipient being shown that a specific person or persons are in hell.


#5

[quote=chevalier]A couple of such revelations involve the recipient being shown that a specific person or persons are in hell.
[/quote]

Could you provide me with a link that states those details for St. Therese of Avila? I searched, but couldn’t find any that mentioned Luther or Calvin appearing to her in hell.


#6

Our priest had once said that Luther, before his death lamented the breaking of the church and his part in it. That he only wanted the church to ‘straighten’ out what he saw as abuses, not break from it. He very well could have wanted to come back and be right with the church before he died.


#7

[quote=cpandersen]A Catholic priest from once told me that Martin Luther requested to have a Catholic priest come to give him last rites at his deathbed…
[/quote]

[quote=RSiscoe]Not sure about that, but on his death bed he is reported to have said: “It is easier to live as a Protestant, but better to die as a Catholic.”
[/quote]

I would not doubt either of those anecdotes. It is better to die as a Catholic.

That is why, even today, there are among us Protestants, those of us with a lingering sadness because there is no place for us in the Catholic Church.

It was, after all, the Catholic Church that excommunicated Luther, not the other way around.


#8

surely you are not suggesting that Martin Luther was just an innocent priest sitting around minding his own business when the Catholic Church decided to excommunicate him for no reason.


#9

[quote=mommy]surely you are not suggesting that Martin Luther was just an innocent priest sitting around minding his own business when the Catholic Church decided to excommunicate him for no reason.
[/quote]

I mean only that there was no place for Luther in the Catholic Church.


#10

When you start calling the catholic church the whore of Babylon and the Pope is anti-christ.
I would say yeah there is no place for you in the church.
Common now folks Luther forced the church’s hand on his excommunication.


#11

[quote=Angainor]I would not doubt either of those anecdotes. It is better to die as a Catholic.

That is why, even today, there are among us Protestants, those of us with a lingering sadness because there is no place for us in the Catholic Church.
[/quote]

Not so, you are welcome. Nothing would make us happier than to have you come into the Church. But to be a Catholic, you are required to accept what the Church teaches. I used to be a Protestant myself, yet the Church welcomed me with open arms when I wanted to join. But of course I did not expect the Church to change any of its teachings so that it agree with me. I realized that if I was to become a Catholic, I would have to accept what it taught. For me that was very easy since it all made perfect sense. I hope you too, will come into the Church one day. We would love to have you, but only if you accept what the Church teaches.


#12

I agree. It’s unfair to shift the blame onto the Church; Luther was quite obviously a heretic, unable to deal with the severity of his scrupulosity and instead of seeking the proper help he needed he decided to re-write the doctrine instead. He was so surprised when he found himself in gross error that he suggested removing the entire book of James from the Bible!! I certainly hope that he is not in hell, but if he is then he put himself there. It’s ironic, in the end Luther’s influence did a lot of good for the Church in the way of calling attention to prevalent abuses which led to their correction.


#13

[quote=Angainor]I would not doubt either of those anecdotes. It is better to die as a Catholic.

That is why, even today, there are among us Protestants, those of us with a lingering sadness because there is no place for us in the Catholic Church.

It was, after all, the Catholic Church that excommunicated Luther, not the other way around.
[/quote]

Angainor, you are always welcome in The Catholic Church, but to be Catholic brings with it the responsibility to maintain the truth The Church teaches. Heresy can only bring problems to THe Church and her members.

The Catholic Church did excommunicate Luther, but you can’t claim he was innocent. His teaching of sola fide has been a disease in The Church. By eexcommunicating him they were attempting to discipline him along with show that he was teaching heresy.

There will always be a place in The Catholic Church for you and every other protestant. It is you that does not see the spot. We await for your return.


#14

[quote=Maccabees]When you start calling the catholic church the whore of Babylon and the Pope is anti-christ.
I would say yeah there is no place for you in the church.
Common now folks Luther forced the church’s hand on his excommunication.
[/quote]

There we have it. Where is the justice? Excommunicated! For what? Denying Christ? Nope. Luther denied the Pope.


#15

It’s ironic, in the end Luther’s influence did a lot of good for the Church in the way of calling attention to prevalent abuses which led to their correction.

God can take something bad and make it into good.
Angainor, you are always welcome!
Plz, we need your help too! Come, let us make the Church great again!


#16

[quote=Angainor]There we have it. Where is the justice? Excommunicated! For what? Denying Christ? Nope. Luther denied the Pope.
[/quote]

The Pope is the Vicar of Christ.
Even in heaven there is great obedience…
Must practice humility before you can come into the Kingdom Angainor.


#17

[quote=Angainor]There we have it. Where is the justice? Excommunicated! For what? Denying Christ? Nope. Luther denied the Pope.
[/quote]

By denying the authority of The Church he denied Christ and consequently The Father. Jesus said, those who reject you reject me, and those who reject me reject the one who sent me.


#18

[quote=Angainor]There we have it. Where is the justice? Excommunicated! For what? Denying Christ? Nope. Luther denied the Pope.
[/quote]

By denying the authority of Peter and Christ church Luther is denying the promises of Christ that the gates of hell will never prevail against the church and the he will build his church on Peter the Rock. Of course he created new heresey with his sola fide and sola scriptura innovations. Excommunicated means cut off from the church. Luther had excommunicated himself long ago and in his words did want to be in union with the Papist. The church had no choice. He knew the consequnces of his actions.
He got his own branch of Christianity in the Lutheran Church. Luther made out well for himself by the excommunication.
If he remains in the church he is just another bad theologian by being excommuniated he is in the anals of protestant history. I don’t see why your upset as your Lutheran. Your church wouldn’t exist if not for Luther not compromising.


#19

[quote=Jimmy]Angainor, you are always welcome in The Catholic Church, but to be Catholic brings with it the responsibility to maintain the truth The Church teaches.
[/quote]

Our only responsibility is to the Truth, not to Cathoicism.

[quote=Jimmy]The Catholic Church did excommunicate Luther, but you can’t claim he was innocent. His teaching of sola fide has been a disease in The Church.
[/quote]

I don’t claim Luther’s doctrines were flawless. Luther was not The Truth (although he may have tought some truths). Catholicism is not The Truth (although it may teach some truths). Jesus is The Truth.

Luther stood up to the institution of Catholicism that had an over developed sense of its own self-importance.

[quote=Jimmy]There will always be a place in The Catholic Church for you and every other protestant. It is you that does not see the spot. We await for your return.
[/quote]

The Catholic Church would not have me at this time. I will be content with my membership in the catholic Church of all true believers. No mortal man can deny membership in that Church.


#20

I have copied the following from Post #2 - RSiscoe

Quote: Not sure about that, but on his death bed he is reported to have said: "It is easier to live as a Protestant, but better to die as a Catholic."End Quote.

I have heard this quote too from somewhere, but cannot remember where. I certainly hope and pray Luther was reconciled to God prior to his death and is in Heaven.
I think that The Church in his times needed a ‘wake-up call’ … and from what I know of Martin Luther, I tend to think things got completely out of control even to him. But then one’s
concept(s) at times depends on source(s) of info forming one’s ideas or concepts about whatever…how sure can I be?..not very sure at all where Martin Luther is concerned anyway.


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