Mary Statues


#1

I see a lot of people in my neighborhood have Mary statues in front of their houses. She appears to be very similar in each one, blue background arch with her arms outstretched.

What is the significance of these?

Why not a Jesus statue instead?


#2

[quote=ruzz]I see a lot of people in my neighborhood have Mary statues in front of their houses. She appears to be very similar in each one, blue background arch with her arms outstretched.

What is the significance of these?

Why not a Jesus statue instead?
[/quote]

Hi Ruzz, Those blue backround arches are an excellent way to recycle old bathtubs. :wink: God Bless


#3

In my neigbourhood they mostly have “Lourdes” statues and “Heart of Jesus” statues. It depends probably on the religiosity of the people which statues they use. Some use both.

I come from Germany where I never ever saw a statue outside a catholic house proclaiming their faith but we lived in a mainly protestant town. For me it has a “show off” effect, I am catholic. Depends where you are coming from, what statue you use, and if at all…

The most popular statues are Fatima, Lourdes and “the miracolous medal” one. Perhaps you want to check out the different appearances of the Virgin Mary.

Mary’s color is blue, so it is hard to say which statue they use in your neigbourhood.

I hope that helps.

Brigitte


#4

[quote=ruzz]I see a lot of people in my neighborhood have Mary statues in front of their houses. She appears to be very similar in each one, blue background arch with her arms outstretched.

What is the significance of these?

Why not a Jesus statue instead?
[/quote]

People have Jesus statues also. My mom has a small sacred heart of Jesus statue.

The significance is simply that Mary is the greatest of the saints, so we honor her.


#5

[quote=ruzz]I see a lot of people in my neighborhood have Mary statues in front of their houses. She appears to be very similar in each one, blue background arch with her arms outstretched.

What is the significance of these?

Why not a Jesus statue instead?
[/quote]

The image of Mary with her arms outstretched is taken from the apparitions of her to St. Catherine Laboure from which we also got the Miraculous Medal. Mary’s arms outstretched with her palms up represents the graces God has given to her to share with the world. The blue background of these small grottoes represents Mary’s color, which is blue for the sapphire blue of the night sky in which she is like the full moon which guides us in the dark.

Statues of Jesus are not discouraged by the Church for exhibition in our front yards, but most people have a feeling that images of Our Lord are too sacred to be displayed in such a way. That’s not true, of course, but many people have that sensibility. Since displaying statues of Jesus and the Saints comes under the heading of devotion not doctrine or dogma, anyone can display such artwork as they please. The only thing the Church asks is that people do so with the proper respect due to the persons which such artworks represent.


#6

Brigitte

This is idolotry
Plain and simple


#7

[quote=michael777]Brigitte
This is idolotry
Plain and simple
[/quote]

Can you tell me what the word idolatry means Michael?


#8

[quote=michael777]Brigitte
[/quote]

This is idolotry
Plain and simple

This statement is ignorance and bigotry, plain and simple.


#9

[quote=michael777]Brigitte
[/quote]

This is idolotry
Plain and simple

Michael, Can you explain to us why you would say such a thing? I really thik you are way of base here.


#10

This is idolotry

LOL only if you are worshipping, or believe in some way the statue is a diety, and not a reminder of a wonderful godly person. Do you have photographs, michael? same thing, except statues were invented first.


#11

[quote=ruzz]I see a lot of people in my neighborhood have Mary statues in front of their houses. She appears to be very similar in each one, blue background arch with her arms outstretched.

What is the significance of these?

Why not a Jesus statue instead?
[/quote]

The significance is the statues and pictures are works of art to remind us of our loved ones. I personally don’t have a statue of anyone in my yard, but, why wouldn’t someone want a statue of his or her mother as a reminder of her? I don’t really understand your question “Why not a Jesus statue instead?” Why would it be wrong to have a statue or picture of your mother? Certainly Jesus isn’t the only one who should be represented in art is He? If I love my wife and children does this diminish the love I have for God?


#12

[quote=Tom]The significance is the statues and pictures are works of art to remind us of our loved ones. I personally don’t have a statue of anyone in my yard, but, why wouldn’t someone want a statue of his or her mother as a reminder of her? I don’t really understand your question “Why not a Jesus statue instead?” Why would it be wrong to have a statue or picture of your mother? Certainly Jesus isn’t the only one who should be represented in art is He? If I love my wife and children does this diminish the love I have for God?
[/quote]

Jesus Christ is the center of CHRISTianity. Therefore, I would expect to see a Jesus statue before a Mary statue. I could somewhat understand BOTH. But why Mary and not Jesus. Or why a small Jesus and large Mary statue? Is it to “advertise” their faith because you can’t see it from inside your house. It appears to be for the benefit of those outside.

My biggest problem with Christian art is that it’s not accurate.

Having a photo of my mother or wife in my wallet is accurate. They look like that. It’s a real facsimile of them.

We don’t know what Mary or Jesus looked like. It’s an artists rendition. Artists have created huge variations of Jesus and Mary. Generally, the images are crafted to look similar to the artists native culture. A Roman artist’s Mary and a Russian artist’s Mary and an African artist’s Mary look totally different.

Mary could have looked like Cindy Crawford or Rosie O’Donnell. We don’t know. We shouldn’t care.

Personally, I find it curious that Jesus and Mary are not physically described in any scripture or documents. It is my opinion that God didn’t want us to have a physical image. People from around the world look different. By keeping Jesus non-descript, they don’t feel He was different from them. God did not want Himself described in physical terms. An African person doesn’t have to feel Jesus was white. He would have probably been very Jewish looking. Western artists tend to portray Him as very European looking. But we just don’t know for sure and probably shouldn’t care.
.


#13

[quote=ruzz]Jesus Christ is the center of CHRISTianity. Therefore, I would expect to see a Jesus statue before a Mary statue. I could somewhat understand BOTH. But why Mary and not Jesus. Or why a small Jesus and large Mary statue? Is it to “advertise” their faith because you can’t see it from inside your house. It appears to be for the benefit of those outside.

My biggest problem with Christian art is that it’s not accurate.

Having a photo of my mother or wife in my wallet is accurate. They look like that. It’s a real facsimile of them.

We don’t know what Mary or Jesus looked like. It’s an artists rendition. Artists have created huge variations of Jesus and Mary. Generally, the images are crafted to look similar to the artists native culture. A Roman artist’s Mary and a Russian artist’s Mary and an African artist’s Mary look totally different.

Mary could have looked like Cindy Crawford or Rosie O’Donnell. We don’t know. We shouldn’t care.

Personally, I find it curious that Jesus and Mary are not physically described in any scripture or documents. It is my opinion that God didn’t want us to have a physical image. People from around the world look different. By keeping Jesus non-descript, they don’t feel He was different from them. God did not want Himself described in physical terms. An African person doesn’t have to feel Jesus was white. He would have probably been very Jewish looking. Western artists tend to portray Him as very European looking. But we just don’t know for sure and probably shouldn’t care.
.
[/quote]

When we honor a saint we honor them in respect to God. In other words, we honor them because of God. They have conquered in this world, and did God’s will, and are now are in heaven with God. That is why we honor them.

You are right, Christ is the center of Christianity, that is why he is the only human to be worshiped.

Christian art is inaccurate, but it inspires. People see a picture of a saint and there mind is immediately drawn to God. You see a statue of Mary, and you think of the incarnation.


#14

[quote=jimmy]When we honor a saint we honor them in respect to God. In other words, we honor them because of God. They have conquered in this world, and did God’s will, and are now are in heaven with God. That is why we honor them.

You are right, Christ is the center of Christianity, that is why he is the only human to be worshiped.

Christian art is inaccurate, but it inspires. People see a picture of a saint and there mind is immediately drawn to God. You see a statue of Mary, and you think of the incarnation.
[/quote]

I agree. Some art can be very inspiring. Some can be revolting. A guy who creates a painting of Mary out of elephant dung thinks he is being inspiring too.

Personally, I think art can also be distracting. When I see a fictitional statue of a real person, I see concrete and marble. It’s not a real depiction. We just don’t know what Jesus or Mary looked like. Any representation would be incorrect.
If I cut out a picture of a woman from a catalog and told you to look at this to remind you of your mother, you would think I was nuts.
I’m thinking God doesn’t want us to see things this way. We don’t know what God’s name is other than “I Am”. His son Jesus has no known description other than a man. I find that curious and deliberate. Why would so much be recorded about Him but nothing about what he looked like?

.


#15

How do you know that Christian art is not accurate? At least some of it? Yes, many of the pictures are the artist’s impression of what either Jesus or Mary looked like.

But, what about the picture of Jesus in the Divine Mercy pictures? Sr. Faustina went to a lot of trouble to ensure that the picture that was made corresponded as closely as possible to the vision of Jesus that she saw.

Don’t you think that at least some of the pictures or statues of Mary also are as close as possible to what a particular visionary described?

When Our Lady showed herself to Juan Diego she looked like one of his people.

What matters is that the pictures and statues remind us of Mary and Jesus, and help us to pray, and to live a Christian life.

Not everyone wants a statue in their garden. I don’t have any, but I have no problem with anyone else wanting them. There are many different aids to piety.


#16

[quote=ruzz]I agree. Some art can be very inspiring. Some can be revolting. A guy who creates a painting of Mary out of elephant dung thinks he is being inspiring too.

Personally, I think art can also be distracting. When I see a fictitional statue of a real person, I see concrete and marble. It’s not a real depiction. We just don’t know what Jesus or Mary looked like. Any representation would be incorrect.
If I cut out a picture of a woman from a catalog and told you to look at this to remind you of your mother, you would think I was nuts.
I’m thinking God doesn’t want us to see things this way. We don’t know what God’s name is other than “I Am”. His son Jesus has no known description other than a man. I find that curious and deliberate. Why would so much be recorded about Him but nothing about what he looked like?

.
[/quote]

I don’t think it compares though to you cutting a picture out of a magazine and calling it a picture of your mother. In the situation with Jesus or Mary, you do not have a picture in your mind of what they look like, so there is nothing in the statue or picture to reject. In the picture, purporting to be of your mother, you know what your mother looks like, so you reject it.

All picture and statues of Jesus are inaccurate, but they offer a view of Christ. Not that that is what he looks like, but it represents a picture of him. It is not so important what they looked like.

I agree, God does not want us to focus on what he looked like as a man. It is not important what he looked like. The statues are only to inspire and to show a representation.

I don’t think any Christian art is distracting. When I see a picture of saint Francis, I immediately think of how well he did God’s will. I think of him as a great saint.

But, if someone made something out of elephant dung, I could only think, “Why?” I don’t think you should create a depiction of something holy with something like elephant dung.


#17

[quote=ruzz] Jesus Christ is the center of CHRISTianity. Therefore, I would expect to see a Jesus statue before a Mary statue. I could somewhat understand BOTH. But why Mary and not Jesus. Or why a small Jesus and large Mary statue? Is it to “advertise” their faith because you can’t see it from inside your house. It appears to be for the benefit of those outside.
[/quote]

Seeing a statue of Mary implies Christianity, because without Jesus, Mary was just some Jewish girl, her life has no significance without Jesus, it would be therefore redundant to have both or require a statue of Jesus. Mary and all of the saints are a gift from God. It’s not a sin to accept His gift.

[quote=ruzz] My biggest problem with Christian art is that it’s not accurate.
[/quote]

Wow!!! Who ever said art has to be accurate? It’s not the purpose of art! You think the last supper was exactly as depicted in the painting? It certainly was not. Art inspires, it helps us contemplate, it isn’t as you say a “facsimile”. It isn’t intended to be. You’ve got a strange idea about what art should be.

[quote=ruzz] Having a photo of my mother or wife in my wallet is accurate. They look like that. It’s a real facsimile of them.
[/quote]

And in most circles the photo, although I’m sure is beautiful, would not be considered “art”.


#18

[quote=Tom]Seeing a statue of Mary implies Christianity, because without Jesus, Mary was just some Jewish girl, her life has no significance without Jesus, it would be therefore redundant to have both or require a statue of Jesus. Mary and all of the saints are a gift from God. It’s not a sin to accept His gift.
Wow!!! Who ever said art has to be accurate? It’s not the purpose of art! You think the last supper was exactly as depicted in the painting? It certainly was not. Art inspires, it helps us contemplate, it isn’t as you say a “facsimile”. It isn’t intended to be. You’ve got a strange idea about what art should be.
And in most circles the photo, although I’m sure is beautiful, would not be considered “art”.
[/quote]

I’ve been told the statues are to remind us of Mary like a photograph would remind us of our own mother.

My argument is then, if it’s to remind us of her, it’s not any more accurate than cutting out a magazine photo and saying it’s my mother.

I think there is a great danger in religious art to be a distraction from what is in our hearts. It’s very easy to think of Jesus in modern day Western images rather then his spirit which lives inside us and our minds. He (and Mary) was not described for a reason I think.

In recent portrayals by Caucasian Christian artists, Yeshua ben Nazereth (a.k.a. Jesus Christ) has typically been shown with a light skin, a long “Presbyterian” nose, very long hair, and a height probably in excess of six feet. The face of Jim Caviezel, who plays Jesus in the movie “The Passion of the Christ,” is similar to many modern-day images of Jesus. He is shown in the bottom picture. Carlos F. Cardoza-Orlandi, associate professor of world Christianity at * Columbia Theological Seminary* in Atlanta, GA, commented: "*While Western imagery is dominant, in other parts of the world he is often shown as black, Arab or Hispanic.

http://www.religioustolerance.org/jesusface.jpghttp://www.religioustolerance.org/jesusface1.gifhttp://www.religioustolerance.org/jesus.jpeg

[font=Arial]So which image looks like Jesus?
*[/font]


#19

Actually, Jim Caviezel was made up to look Semitic. That is not how he looks without such make up. They even colored his eyes, which are naturally blue to brown, when they digitized the film.

Jews, just like other peoples, don’t have only one look. They are quite varied. We are told that David was ruddy cheeked, which means he was lighter in complexion than his brothers, probably because his mother was fair, too. If you look at pictures of modern Kurds, who are Semitic, many have blue eyes.

It is a modern need to make Jesus into something quite different from the ancient model we have of him. In the end it doesn’t matter what his facial features were, of course, but it is a mistake to simply assume that what we hear from modern “scholars” who weren’t there has to be truer than the sort of image people have had of Jesus for centuries. That image was based on the Shroud of Turin, which had its origins in the Middle East not Europe, btw.


#20

[quote=ruzz]I think art can also be distracting.
.
[/quote]

Yes, art can be distracting. Music can be distracting too. If art and music help us turn our focus away from things of this world and turned upward to things of heaven, the distraction is good. If we focus on the physical details but ignore the spiritual realities they represent, we are using art wrong.

I want Jesus, Mary, the angels and the saints to be present in my garden whether or not I have a statue there reminding me that they are. But the statues help remind us of the ever-presence of God and the communion of the saints. A garden is a lovely place to walk with God, and I don’t think He minds if His mother and friends come along too.


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