Mary's Help

As I wait to get “Hail, Hol Queen” by Scott Hahn, I have a question.

I’ve seen prayers asking Mary for help. What kind of help are you asking for? What can she do?

Thanks for your answers.

Intercede with her Divine Son on our behalf.
Dispense the graces of God.
It’s not a matter of what she can do on her own. It’s a matter of what God can do through her because she chose to do His will. :thumbsup:

So when you ask Mary for help, you are just asking her to pray for you?

While you are waiting for “Hail Holy Queen” I highly recommend “True Devotion to Mary” by St. Louis de Montfort which can be found online:
ewtn.com/library/Montfort/TRUEDEVO.HTM

If you want a hard copy I recommend the one from this site:
montfortmissionaries.com/publications/index.phtml?orderid=4434ada4055e6b67e209a186b7edb05c

I haven’t read over it but here’s a (free) study course that might be of some interest also:
salvationhistory.com//online/intermediate/intermedcourse2_home.cfm

[quote=Laud_God]So when you ask Mary for help, you are just asking her to pray for you?
[/quote]

No, that is not the only thing we ask from her. We also ask from her that which she has already obtained. We also ask for her to help us directly - meaning to obtain it and then apply it to us. We also ask her to present our gifts to God for us. We ask many things. Whole books have been written with examples. So it is much more than merely asking her to pray for us, though that is certainly a big one.

hurst

[quote=Madia]While you are waiting for “Hail Holy Queen” I highly recommend “True Devotion to Mary” by St. Louis de Montfort which can be found online:
ewtn.com/library/Montfort/TRUEDEVO.HTM

If you want a hard copy I recommend the one from this site:
montfortmissionaries.com/publications/index.phtml?orderid=4434ada4055e6b67e209a186b7edb05c
]
[/quote]

I would strongly disagree with this advice. If you are not sure of the role of Mary, then this book is not going to be helpful. It is written in a more flowery and profuse manner (written in the 19th century) than what we are used to today. It is an excellent book for Catholics and Protestants who already have a good understanding of Mary’s role, but I would not recommend it to those who are unsure of Mary’s role and seeking to understand.

[quote=hurst]No, that is not the only thing we ask from her. We also ask from her that which she has already obtained. We also ask for her to help us directly - meaning to obtain it and then apply it to us. We also ask her to present our gifts to God for us. We ask many things. Whole books have been written with examples. So it is much more than merely asking her to pray for us, though that is certainly a big one.

hurst
[/quote]

You lost me with that…

Could you explain these statements more fully?

[quote=Laud_God]You lost me with that…

Could you explain these statements more fully?
[/quote]

Ok, let’s see…

“We also ask from her that which she has already obtained.”

This means that she has graces from God already right now, and if we ask her for them, she has the ability to give them to us if she wishes.

Let me give an analogy. Imagine a huge hurricane hit and devastated the area, leaving it without electricity or running water. You now have to seek for water, but the local stores are out because everyone has stocked up or you got there too late. It will be some time before the local store is restocked, so you have to wait. What do you do, since you need it sooner? You find someone who has already obtained bottled water from the local store, and ask them directly. Sure, you could pray straight to God, and He might make water miraculously appear in front of you. But we know this is not how God usually works. Instead, we are led to someone who was prudent enough to have stored up extra. And so we find a generous neighbor, and ask them directly. And you see it is up to them whether they will give it to us or not. In fact, it is up to them to decide whether they will even answer the door. Do they know us? Etc.

History shows that God works this way. He provides through select channels, and tells us to go to these chosen ones to be helped. The story of Joseph and the Pharao is an older example.

The same occurs in our life as a new creation in Christ. In the order of grace, we must go to the Church to be fed the gift of finest wheat, just as of old people had to go to Joseph to be fed of the stored wheat of Pharao. The saints have accumulated a store of graces also, and the Church acts as dispenser of these when it grants indulgences. But Mary is our Mother in the order of grace, and is full of grace.

And so we can ask her to share her graces with us. This is especially beneficial if we find ourselves struggling with some sin we know offends God. But we can ask them for others, too. This is in addition to asking her to pray for us. This is asking her directly to share with us something she has. It is appropriate to do so, and recommended.

I will cover more in another post.

hurst

Ok, next one.

“We also ask for her to help us directly - meaning to obtain it and then apply it to us”

She is a good Samaritan in this sense. We are asking for her to obtain what we need and then give it to us. We do this when we cannot help ourselves, and what we ask is not necessarily something she already has. She then intercedes for us, obtains it from her Son, and then brings it and applies it to us.

I am reminded of an old but well-documented story of Theophilus, an archdeacon who was falsely accused of some crime and deposed from his position. He took this so much to heart, that in his passion he went to a Jewish magician, who made him consult Satan for help. The devil told him that to be helped by him, he must renounce Jesus and his Mother Mary, and consign him the act of renunciation written in his own hand. Theophilus immediately complied with the demand. The next day, the bishop discovered he had been deceived, asked the archdeacon’s pardon, and restored him to office. No sooner was this done than his conscience was torn with remorse. He went to a church and cried before an image of Mary and begging her to help him from despairing. He stayed there praying and weeping for forty days, when one night she appeared to him and asked him why he renounced the friendship of her and her Son for that of their enemy. He replied by entreating her to obtain pardon from her Son for him. When she saw his confidence, she agreed to intercede for him. He was consoled and redoubled his prayers and tears. She soon returned with the happy message that God accepted his tears, but that he should now remain faithful and grateful. But this wasn’t enough for Theophilus, for the enemy still possessed the document of renunciation. He implored her to get it back. Three days later, he woke up in the middle of the night with the writing laying on him. He then publicly related to the bishop in tears all he had done and gave him the writing. The bishop burned it and the people rejoiced at the mercy of God. Three days later Theophilus died filled with joy and gratitude.

This somewhat extreme example clearly shows a case where she obtains something for someone putting their confidence in her. It is clear that it is not in conflict with our relationship with God, but rather enhances and helps it. The conflict is with consulting the devil either directly or through his agents.

hurst

Ok, the last one I listed (though there are more).

“We also ask her to present our gifts to God for us”

This means we are seeking to please Our Lord by leveraging the fact that Jesus is pleased by Mary, and that He is pleased by humility and faith. Instead of approaching Him by ourself, we ask Mary to present our thanks, praise, and petitions to Him.

If you recall the story of the Centurion, he sent others to ask Jesus to heal his sick servant, declaring he was not worthy to deal with Jesus directly. This testified to the Centurion’s faith of Jesus’ power, authority, and high position with God. And Jesus praised this Centurion for his faith.

An analogy of the value of Mary presenting our gifts to Jesus is as follows: imagine we are surfs given a plot of land in exchange for rendering a portion of the fruits to the landowner. Upon finding a poor yield and imperfect fruits, we rely on the help of the Queen, who generously helps us. She presents a sample of our best fruits - worm-eaten though they may be - on her golden platter to the King. The King accepts them because they are presented in a wonderful setting by a pleasing representative, as though giving credit to our decision to use her help.

And we in our Christian lives - what fruits are rendering to our King? Would we call them perfect charity, perfect patience, perfect anything? Let us then rely on Mary’s perfect charity, perfect patience, etc. and ask her to present our fruits to Jesus for us. And not only our fruits, but also our petitions and thanksgiving.

Let us be wise stewards. We can be wise by relying on Mary to help us in our shortcomings. We can exercise a more perfect humility by relying on her. (*Ecclesiasticus 35:21 The prayer of him that humbleth himself, shall pierce the clouds… *).

hurst

[quote=Sherlock]I would strongly disagree with this advice. If you are not sure of the role of Mary, then this book is not going to be helpful. It is written in a more flowery and profuse manner (written in the 19th century) than what we are used to today. It is an excellent book for Catholics and Protestants who already have a good understanding of Mary’s role, but I would not recommend it to those who are unsure of Mary’s role and seeking to understand.
[/quote]

I wholeheartedly concur.

I do not know why every thread related to Mary has this posited as the answer. It is only fine reading if you stand firm in the Catholic faith. It will only confuse those coming home or with a prejudice against Mary.

In Christ.

Andre.

[quote=Laud_God]As I wait to get “Hail, Hol Queen” by Scott Hahn, I have a question.

I’ve seen prayers asking Mary for help. What kind of help are you asking for? What can she do?

Thanks for your answers.
[/quote]

She prays that we may recieve grace from God, which is the greatest help that we can recieve.

[quote=Laud_God]So when you ask Mary for help, you are just asking her to pray for you?
[/quote]

Absolutely-just as i would be if I asked you pray for me. However with Mary it is much more powerful. She is the Mother of God. The Mediatrix. At Fatima and Lourdes She herself specifically asked us to pray to her .

[quote=Laud_God]As I wait to get “Hail, Hol Queen” by Scott Hahn, I have a question.

I’ve seen prayers asking Mary for help. What kind of help are you asking for? What can she do?

Thanks for your answers.
[/quote]

Go to your local library to get “Hail Holy Queen”. They have it. Why buy it when you can read it for free.

Absolutely-just as i would be if I asked you pray for me…
[/quote]

Perhaps that is what you limit yourself to. As I explained, there are more ways to pray to Mary than simply asking her to pray for us.

hurst

[quote=hurst]Perhaps that is what you limit yourself to. As I explained, there are more ways to pray to Mary than simply asking her to pray for us.

hurst
[/quote]

Did you read the rest of my post??? Did you miss the part about Mediatrix?

[quote=estesbob]Did you read the rest of my post??? Did you miss the part about Mediatrix?
[/quote]

Yes, I was wondering about that. It didn’t seem to match your first sentence, though. So you agree she can do more than just pray for us, and that we can ask for more than just her prayers?

hurst

[quote=hurst]Yes, I was wondering about that. It didn’t seem to match your first sentence, though. So you agree she can do more than just pray for us, and that we can ask for more than just her prayers?

hurst
[/quote]

Sure-she told us so both at Lourdes and fatima. However having he pray for us is not a bad start!

Hello, Hurst. This is not a “contribution”, this is an honest technical question…

**I’ve seen everyone for months posting “nested quotes” within quotes, just like you did in post #15 below. There are times I’ve wanted to do this, but can’t. How do you set up to quote “nested quotes”? **

The rest of you, don’t make fun, it’s not nice. Some of us can’t “live” on these forums, and if I get a “slow” week, that’s when I take advantage. But not enough time to learn all the neat tricks!)
God Bless Us All!

To do a nested quote, it must start and end within an existing quote.

The above will look like this:

hurst

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