Mass excuses

I just thought I’d share a few thoughts about how to counter some of the most common “Mass excuses” (cop-outs for not going). Please post your own as well.

Excuse #1: The Mass is not relevant to my life.
How do you plan to change your life to make it relevant to the Mass? Our life is not the standard by which the Mass should be measured, but vice-versa. In other words, if the Mass is not relevant to your life, then it is your life, not the Mass, which needs to change.

Excuse #2: I don’t get anything out of Mass.
Why are you so concerned about what you get out of the Mass? If you love the Lord, you will be grateful for the opportunity to give the Lord worship that is pleasing to him.

Excuse #3: There are too many hypocrites in the Church.
Ok, if you go to Mass, you will spend one hour a week with these kind of people. If you were to go to Mass every Sunday for the next 100 years, you would spend the equivalent of about 217 days with the hypocrites (less then one year). Contrast this with having to spend all eternity in Hell with them, and you see that you will do much better at avoiding hypocrites than if you avoid going to Mass.

Granted, I may not use these exact words if I have good reason to be concerned for coming across too harsh, but this is essentially the message I would convey.

David

If you Jesus was going to be at the football stadium next week would you go?

Why?

He is in the Church every day.

Now if they answer no to question one it is a different problem.

David, number three is priceless.

Betsy

A lot of folks just have a hard time getting into a suit on Sunday morning to sit on a hard bench and listen to a minister or priest.

I don’t think that flagging church attendance is exclusive to Catholics at all, just part of the inattention(seems everyone is ADD nowadays, eh?) and de-formalization of American society.

#4.) I don’t have to go to Mass every Sunday. Vatican II changed that.

#5.) The Catholic Church in the USA has a special “dispensation” so we don’t have to go to Mass every Sunday.

#6.) “Where ever two people gather…”

More Mass Cop-outs

#7: Can’t go, kids got a game and the coach would be mad if we miss the huddle.

#8: I will go hiking and enjoy God out of doors.

#9: All they want is money, money, money - thats what its all about.

#10: That stinky incense and mothball smell – yuck!

Can’t remember anything as good as #3.

God Bless

  1. It conflicts with a fraternity meeting (late Mass) and I was out partying last night (Sat. night and Sun. morning Masses).

  2. I was just too tired.

  3. It’s Super Bowl Sunday.

  4. Just as long as I go on Christmas and Easter, I’ll be fine.

[quote=ChuckODonnell]#8: I will go hiking and enjoy God out of doors.

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Our priest had homily about this. He said that the main problem with this is that no one actually does!!! He went on to say that we need the community to keep us faithful to our commitment to spend time with God.

It is a good idea to notice when your friends are not at Mass, and give them a call and tell them that you missed them. It could open up their hearts.

If you don’t have any friends at your parish, it would be a good reason to make some :wink: .

God Bless,
Iguana

  1. God will understand.

  2. I’ll go this afternoon. (Hey, I’ve used this one before – knowing I’ll be too tired to go :o .)

John

  1. I have too many sins. I’ll wait till I get to confession first.

  2. We went this week already.

  3. Its raining and I will get wet (happens a lot in the Northwest).

“17. I have too many sins. I’ll wait till I get to confession first.”

A pretty valid excuse, if true. Theologically, Catholics are not supposed to attend if not in a state of grace.

[quote=Fullsidesedan]Theologically, Catholics are not supposed to attend if not in a state of grace.
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Not actually, Catholics are not supposed to receive the Eucharist if not in a state of grace.

John

[quote=David Ancell]Excuse #3: There are too many hypocrites in the Church.
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To this I always respond, “Wow, it’s lucky there are no hypocrites in the bars, grocery stores, movies, or where you work, or you’d have to stay home altogether!”

Pax Christi. <><

Not actually, Catholics are not supposed to receive the Eucharist if not in a state of grace.

Technically speaking, you are of course correct.

But since its such a faux pax to attend and not receive, it is probably better for them to not attend at all, lest their non-reception be interpreted as disbelief.

[quote=Fullsizesedan]…since its such a faux pax to attend and not receive, it is probably better for them to not attend at all, lest their non-reception be interpreted as disbelief.
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Well, if give the choice between committing a faux pax or a mortal sin…I’d chose the faux pax! :smiley:

Pax Christi. <><

Well, if give the choice between committing a faux pax or a mortal sin…I’d chose the faux pax!

That’s a moral theology question here, is it a worse sin for a Catholic to not attend and miss the obligation? Or is it worse to attend, publicly not receive and by doing so silently proclaim their disbelief. That’s sounds like a serious sin as well, akin to heresy or apostasy.

When one is in a state of mortal sin, they should refrain from recieving the Eucharist.

However, it is far better to at least be seated in the presence of Christ and hopefully understand what one is missing by being “seperated” from Christ by sin.

If it was a sin to attend mass even without being able to go forward at Communion, I would definitely be going to Hell.

Jesus came for sinners, and if we are going to Mass, we are benefiting from the teachings. Last week as I struggled to get to confession so that I could go to Communion again, I sat near the front of the chapel. I’ve never felt so close to Jesus…yet so far away. That understanding goaded me into the confessional so that I don’t have to watch people step over me or around me as I sat in the pew.

By your words, you have been judging others as dissenters at Mass…I would never consider someone sitting in a pew at Communion as a dissenter…that is for God to discern.

If you would like to remain home when you are in a state of mortal sin, by all means go ahead…and just remember to keep talley and confess that sin and the number when you get to confession. In fact, give the priest your “theory” so he can correct your thinking appropriately.

I will be praying for you.

<<<<<<That’s a moral theology question here, is it a worse sin for a Catholic to not attend and miss the obligation? Or is it worse to attend, publicly not receive and by doing so silently proclaim their disbelief. That’s sounds like a serious sin as well, akin to heresy or apostasy>>>>>>>>>>>

[quote=JCPhoenix] Did you post here to start an argument or do you really believe these words??? Do YOU YOURSELF judge others who refrain from communion? As I have firsthand experience with this (as so many other Catholics) let me educate you. Refraining from Communion is a act of BELIEF and only Satan would dare to twist our attempt to keep from further mortal sin and suggest we are heretics.

When one is in a state of mortal sin, they should refrain from recieving the Eucharist. Period. To do so would be sacrilege and would be a sin against the Body and Blood of Christ.

However, it is far better to at least be seated in the presence of Christ and hopefully understand what one is missing by being “seperated” from Christ by sin.

JESUS CAME FOR SINNERS and if we are going to Mass, we are benefiting from the teachings. Last week as I struggled to get to confession so that I could go to Communion again, I sat near the front of the chapel at daily mass. I’ve never felt so close to Jesus…yet so far away. That understanding goaded me into the confessional, yet I did not go forward for communion…and it is very difficult to NOT go forward with everyone else. It forces one to understand they are NOT in the graces of God with the others who CAN go forward. Understand?

By your words, you have been judging others as dissenters and disbelievers at Mass…I would never consider someone sitting in a pew at Communion as a dissenter…that is for God to discern.

If you would like to remain home when you are in a state of mortal sin, by all means go ahead…and just remember to keep talley and confess that sin and the number when you get to confession. In fact, give the priest your “theory” so he can correct your thinking appropriately.

I will be praying for you.
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A perfect act of contrition will restore your state of grace again however you will need to make a formal confession as soon as reasonablly possible for formal absolution.

God Bless

*By your words, you have been judging others as dissenters and disbelievers at Mass…I would never consider someone sitting in a pew at Communion as a dissenter…that is for God to discern. *

Neither would I, sorry if you misunderstood. I would consider someone in the pews during communion to be a non-catholic. Communion is an auto da fe, act of faith among Catholics, and non-catholics should definitely not recieve Catholic communion unless invited to by the priest and then only if their own church and their loyalty to their church permits it

But for a Catholic to sit in the pews is almost scandalous, as he or she is basically disregarding Catholic teaching, and neglecting this act of faith in the Catholic faith.

The last mass I attended, being a cradle Protestant, the priest did not invite non-catholics, I did not receive, but I was affirming by own religious heritage, it wasn’t a problem, I certainly wasn’t going to disobey the wishes of the priest and disrespect his rule on communion.

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