Mass of Creation Poll


#1

Okay, here’s a poll for the popular Mass of Creation.


#2

My biggest problem with Mass of Creation is that it is used so often I’m tired of it. But once in a while is OK.

I think it’s the best comtemporary setting for use with the organ. Other contemporary settings tend to be written for for the piano and/or guitar and don’t sound right played with organ.


#3

I don’t mind it - don’t really hear it a ton anyway. At least I’m familiar with it and can sing along :smiley:


#4

My husband calls it “Mass of Recreation”. Not fond of it, nor the one that sounds like a bunch of cowboys out on the prairies after hittin’ the chuck wagon.


#5

It’s okay but we need something different. My parish has done it to death. There’s another Mass setting for the “Lamb of God” (which I can’t remember the author of right now) that you can swear you can hear seagulls.


#6

The first 20 times I heard it I could live with it, but after that, every parish had to use it on every Sunday, and it just got old and overplayed.


#7

I would stick with the Orbis Factor any day… :slight_smile:


#8

I am really tired of it. I also think that we ahould use Catholic music for the Liturgy. I understand that the Mass of Creation was originally written as a Lutheran service, not Catholic, and I know Marty Haugen is not a Catholic.

Peace,
Linda


#9

Like most contemporary sets of service music, the musicality of the Mass of Cremation simply does not represent the nature of the prayer and the Sacrament, even if most of the words are correctly translated. The parts have catchy tunes, but not SACRED tunes. Many people may not know the difference, and it is something which defies description. For instance, take Michelangelo’s Pieta, and place it next to a similar statue I carved with a chainsaw into an oak log. Both represent the anguish of Our Lady as she holds the body of her Son removed from the cross. It is just that Signor Buonarotti’s statue represents the image in a more profound and spiritual manner than does my own Stihl-life.


#10

What is a Mass of Creation? This is the first time I’ve heard of it.

Gearoidin


#11

I’m sick of it…

I didn’t vote for an outright ban…I realize that different people have different musical tastes.

I do wish we could have picked multiple options…I really hate the added words to the Agnus Dei. Just translate the friggan prayer. Don’t add, don’t take away. I hate the addition…


#12

I vote to ban it.

When the sun of culture is low on the horizon, even dwarves cast long shadows.


#13

It is a musical setting of the unchangeable parts of the Mass, written by contemporary composer Marty Haugen. It is done very, very often in United States parishes, and many people like it very much.

Many other people are very tired of it.

The Lamb of God has optional extra titles of Jesus included which violate the liturgical rules, but people in some parishes sing them anyway, assuming it’s OK to do because a Catholic publisher has provided the music.

Betsy


#14

The Mass of Creation sounds too whiny to me.

Haugen didn’t only mess with the Agnus Dei. Whats with this “God of Power, God of Might” business?

It’s “God of Power and Might” Marty!!!

As I’ve said many times before, the liberals ought to be getting their last thrills in, because if by the grace of God the new English Mass translation ever gets implemented in our lifetimes, then the Mass of Creation or “Cremation” is instantly obsolete. The tune just won’t go with “Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of Hosts” which I understand is or is close to the new translation.

Of course how many souls will have left this earth and not ever hear the new translation in the meantime. But that is another story.

This new translation does present Marty with an opportunity to write the Mass of Creation II and make more money, but I hope that people are smarter about the sequel.


#15

I sometimes listen to a tape of this in my car, but really don’t think of it in context of Mass in a church.
Am likely to join in while listening to monastic recordings of Gregorian chant.


#16

Do you really thing that Marty won’t change around the new translation to fit his quaint music?
He did it with the current one, what’s stopping him doing the same to the new one?


#17

Like I said, I’m sure that he will try.

I think that the whole implementation of the translation thing will end up being tighter than most people think. Most of what Haugen got away with was when the liturgy was getting sloppy, all the liturgists were experimenting, and few in the pews cared.

People just accepted changing things that had been around in the Novus Ordo a few years as being OK. But if you are going to a new standard, and before people learn it, you have variations out there, then it will definitely be confusing. No body will really know what is right and I think people will want some uniformity for awhile.


#18

I agree with the overplayed sentiment.

Its gotten a little extreme. Regardless of season, regardless of event, regardless of location, for better or for worse you can count on the Mass of Creation. It gets rather monotonous.

Well…I’m placing the Mass of Creation on hiatus indefinitely beginning in November. We’re switching to Orbis Factor and Community Mass (Proulx). Change is good. While I won’t venture to say the Community Mass is the best setting, it is by far better music (in my opinion) and doesn’t change the text (a couple of text repetitions and changing “blessed” to “blest” I don’t THINK are out of bounds). Just ignore the second Agnus Dei.


#19

Our parish switches Mass settings often during the year. I don’t remember them all, but we use Mass of Creation during half of Ordinary time, Mass of the Life of the World, the Hurd Mass (for Lent), and one or two others that get rotated depending on the season.

I like the Mass of Creation, probably because I don’t hear it/play it constantly. I imagine if that were the only Mass setting used, I’d get pretty bored of it.


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