Mass on saturday


#1

Today,Saturday, I have a Confirmation Mass for my nephew (at 2 PM). It may be considered as a mass of holly day of obligation or I should go tomorrow too?
All my kids are complaining since I suggested that.


#2

It’s still too early to fulfill your Sunday Obligation. You’ll have to go to another Mass. Let your kids complain. Going to Mass frequently isn’t a bad thing, but a good thing.


#3

Saturday Vigil may have to be after 6:00PM in order to be considered a fulfillment of Sunday Obligation. Still, that may be done only for a good and excusable, if not emergency, reason. We can't just say "God, I offer you this instead of what you have commanded because I think this is better for me". That's not the way how God works.


#4

Could the priest allow the Mass to be fulfilling of your Sunday obligation? Canonically, it's after "vespera" but what exactly does that mean? 2PM or 6PM isn't mentioned in the Canon.


#5

[quote="ProVobis, post:4, topic:302474"]
Could the priest allow the Mass to be fulfilling of your Sunday obligation? Canonically, it's after "vespera" but what exactly does that mean? 2PM or 6PM isn't mentioned in the Canon.

[/quote]

Or the Bishop? Since it is a Confirmation Mass, could the bishop allow the Mass to fulfill the obligation?


#6

A Confirmation Mass is not a vigil Mass so you will have to go to another Mass.


#7

[quote="ProVobis, post:4, topic:302474"]
Could the priest allow the Mass to be fulfilling of your Sunday obligation? Canonically, it's after "vespera" but what exactly does that mean? 2PM or 6PM isn't mentioned in the Canon.

[/quote]

Something tells me the late Pontiff tried to clarify that a while back, but I can't put my hand on it at the moment. Anyway, I believe the standard for "the Vespers hour" is considered to be 16h00 (4:00pm) local. However, (and if IIRC) there are some exceptions. Las Vegas is (or at least, was) one where, I think, the bishop set the time earlier to accommodate casino workers.


#8

Well apparently our Sabbath begins at around 4-6pm, so this mass isn't going to be a sunday mass, just a confirmation mass that takes place on saturday. It'd be really surprising if so, I mean it's 2pm saturday, how far back are we going to extend the vigil mass?? Remember that for the Jews, the new day began at sundown, that's why the vigil mass exists.

And if your kids don't like it, well too bad, you have an obligation as a father, raising his kids in the Catholic faith, to take them to mass and teach them about how important that holy mass is. Explain it to them.

Very glad to hear your nephew is choosing to live in Christ. Pax Christi!


#9

[quote="ADiosgracias, post:1, topic:302474"]
Today,Saturday, I have a Confirmation Mass for my nephew (at 2 PM). It may be considered as a mass of holly day of obligation or I should go tomorrow too?
All my kids are complaining since I suggested that.

[/quote]

In your example, you should go to the Sunday Mass also. The Confirmation Mass that you are attending on Saturday at 2 PM is not counted as the Sunday Mass.

It is always good to go to the daily Mass, however this does not fulfill the Sunday obligation. The Saturday evening Mass (I believe from 5 PM and on) does fulfill your Sunday Mass obligation. During the Saturday evening Mass, they do the Sunday morning readings.


#10

[quote="maryjk, post:5, topic:302474"]
Or the Bishop? Since it is a Confirmation Mass, could the bishop allow the Mass to fulfill the obligation?

[/quote]

Unless there was a very good reason to do so (what, I don't know), I would think such would just be encouraging the laziness of other people who want to make sure they don't go to church too much. I remember the weekend of my friend's ordination. A 3 hour ordination Mass on Friday night, followed by his first Mass Saturday Morning, and then still having to attend Mass on Sunday. Despite being a daily Mass-goer, I was left quite drained after it. I liken it to my introverted disposition and having to be "actively participating" so much, whereas I'm used to being able to spend Mass in quiet meditation.


#11

It boils down to the intent of the Priest (celebrant). One clue to watch for is rather the Sunday readings are used or not.


#12

[quote="Deo_Gratias42, post:10, topic:302474"]
Unless there was a very good reason to do so (what, I don't know), I would think such would just be encouraging the laziness of other people who want to make sure they don't go to church too much. I remember the weekend of my friend's ordination. A 3 hour ordination Mass on Friday night, followed by his first Mass Saturday Morning, and then still having to attend Mass on Sunday. Despite being a daily Mass-goer, I was left quite drained after it. I liken it to my introverted disposition and having to be "actively participating" so much, whereas I'm used to being able to spend Mass in quiet meditation.

[/quote]

It isn't my place to tell the bishop what to do. It is totally up to him.


#13

[quote="poptown, post:3, topic:302474"]
Saturday Vigil may have to be after 6:00PM in order to be considered a fulfillment of Sunday Obligation. Still, that may be done only for a good and excusable, if not emergency, reason. We can't just say "God, I offer you this instead of what you have commanded because I think this is better for me". That's not the way how God works.

[/quote]

It is generally after 4PM in most places and you don't need a special reason to attend it. It fulfills your Sunday obligation just as well as attending on Sunday, no exceptions. It is the same as the Sunday Mass. That is the teaching of the Church.


#14

[quote="ChibiViolet, post:6, topic:302474"]
A Confirmation Mass is not a vigil Mass so you will have to go to another Mass.

[/quote]

The problem is not with the fact that it's a Confirmation Mass, but the time; in most places, 4 pm is considered the earliest a Saturday Mass can fulfill the Sunday obligation. There are occasional exceptions, as in Las Vegas, where I guess they're glad to get folks to Mass at any time. ;)


#15

The readings are not what dictates fulfillment of the obligation, but rather the time of the Mass:

Can. 1248 §1. A person who assists at a Mass celebrated anywhere in a Catholic rite either on the feast day itself or in the evening of the preceding day satisfies the obligation of participating in the Mass.

There is some discussion as to what constitutes “evening”, but that is the key.


#16

[quote="dixieagle, post:15, topic:302474"]
The readings are not what dictates fulfillment of the obligation, but rather the time of the Mass:

Can. 1248 §1. A person who assists at a Mass celebrated anywhere in a Catholic rite either on the feast day itself or in the evening of the preceding day satisfies the obligation of participating in the Mass.

There is some discussion as to what constitutes "evening", but that is the key.

[/quote]

I said it was a clue. It boils sown to the intent of the Priest (Celebrant). Quoting Canon law is of no benefit in this matter.


#17

Quoting Canon law is of no benefit in this matter.

On the contrary. However the Latin is authoritative, not the English translation.

Can. 1248 — § 1. Praecepto de Missa participanda satisfacit qui Missae assistit ubicumque celebratur ritu catholico vel ipso die festo vel vespere diei praecedentis.


#18

[quote="Kevin812, post:16, topic:302474"]
I said it was a clue. It boils sown to the intent of the Priest (Celebrant). Quoting Canon law is of no benefit in this matter.

[/quote]

"Intent of the Priest" has nothing to do with it. Canon Law indeed does.


#19

You shold go the next day also. Canon law puts the time for the anticipated mass as starting at 4:00 pm at the earliest.


#20

[quote="poche, post:19, topic:302474"]
You shold go the next day also. Canon law puts the time for the anticipated mass as starting at 4:00 pm at the earliest.

[/quote]

Canon Law doesn't give a 'time', except 'evening before'. The 4 p.m. time comes from a document from 1953, 'Christus Dominus' which first allowed 'evening Masses' and dictated that they couldn't start before 4 p.m.

Rule VI. If the circumstance calls for it as necessary, We grant to the local Ordinaries the right to permit the celebration of Mass in the evening, as we said, but in such wise that the Mass shall not begin before four o'clock in the afternoon,


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