Mass = *yawn* :(


#1

Hi, I always found mass extremely boring. I love God alot, I just hate going to mass becaus it is so boring. I fall asleep. I used to love mass, but now I think…hmmm…when is it going to be over???
I also fall asleep doing the rosary. :frowning:
I know life isn’t all about me, but I can’t follow that rule. I’m addicted to putting myself first. :frowning: anyone relate?


#2

I can relate. I hadn’t been to Mass since May and Christmas was the first time I actually went to Mass. When I was there, I remembered why I had such a hard time going. It IS routine and monotone and kinda boring.
I just kept saying to myself “it’s all about giving God what I owe Him”. The third commandment says I owe Him an hour of public worship a week. I think I can try and manage that. It’s easier said than done but that’s what I try and focus on! :thumbsup:


#3

You love God a lot?

Love is a choice, not just something that happens to you. So what you’re saying is that you choose to love God, a lot.

So you should choose not to fall asleep at Mass, or during the rosary. You should choose not to put yourself first. You should choose to worship God as he asked, by participating in the Mass.

You wouldn’t say about your parents, kids, friends, spouse etc. that “I love you a lot, but I’m going to fall asleep when we’re talking because I put myself first.”

Right?


#4

that is a very good analogy. I wouldn’t do that to my family. God is my family, and I’m doing it to Him. :frowning:


#5

Something that helps me a lot is offering up my Mass or Rosary. That way, I’m giving my best because it is not just for ME but for someone else too! :slight_smile:

Also, remembering that I’m there to give myself, not get something out of it, helps too. It’s a struggle, esp. when I’m tired or stressed out, but it helps a lot :).


#6

Just a question (or two):

  1. Are you aware that one of the precepts of the Church is that you attend Mass on sundays and all holy days of obligation, (and missing said obligations is a grave sin)?

  2. Did you receive the Eucharist at Mass on Christmas? And if so did you confess before hand?

Also your comment, ‘I just kept saying to myself "it’s all about giving God what I owe Him’." Is incorrect. While it is an obligation to attend and to assist attentively at Mass, it is MUCH MORE than just simply giving God His due…and also to say that Mass is boring shows a lack of understanding of what exactly is taking place at Mass. The reality of Mass can be no more boring than being present at Our Lord’s crucifixtion and at the same time being in communion with Him and all of His Angels and Saints in a celebration that takes place at a joining of heaven and earth. The Mass, in its reality, should be the LEAST boring event in our daily lives!


#7

I second the idea to offer up your Mass/Holy Communion for a certain person or intention. During Mass you can ask God to help you see who/what He wants you to offer this for. Or you could also offer it to Him for whoever needs it most.

If you get caught in a long, boring homily, you could say prayers for the Holy Souls in Purgatory or for the souls who are dying and will be going to Hell today.

Prayer of St. Gertrude the Great (releases 1,000 souls from Purgatory each time it is prayed):

Eternal Father, I offer thee the most Precious Blood of thy Divine Son, Jesus Christ, in union with the Masses said throughout the world today, for all the Holy Souls in Purgatory, for sinners everywhere, those in the universal Church, in my home, and within my family. Amen.

See www.mtep.com for more info on this devotion :slight_smile:


#8

Maybe you should participate a little more like being an altar server—it is hard to fall asleep when you are moving about. Or being in the choir or a cantor—unless you can fall asleep while singing. Then again try sitting on a tack. Boring is as boring does.


#9

Maybe you could read The Lamb’s Supper by Scott Hahn which will undoutbtedly lead you to a new, deeper apreciation for each part of the Mass.You’ll go from seeing it as an obligation to seeing it as an opportunity.

Also you could pre-read the readings for Mass and atleast during the Liturgy of the Word you will already be invested.

Also you can practice Eucharistic Adoration which will heighten your spiritual senses when receiving Cmmunion.


#10

If you would like to get more out of Mass, there are several good books that will make you realize the good stuff that could possibly be zipping right past you. The Lamb’s Supper by Scott Hahn is one. It’s written in a down-to-earth style for the common person.

I also fall asleep doing the rosary. :frowning:
I know life isn’t all about me, but I can’t follow that rule. I’m addicted to putting myself first. :frowning: anyone relate

C.S. Lewis says that the prayers you say when you just don’t feel like it are God’s favorite. I guess these are the most likely to be for Him and not for yourself.


#11

I guess I was typing while you were submitting.


#12

Try the book We Worship - a Guide to the Catholic Mass. Available here: amm.org/chss.htm and also at places like Amazon. I found that it gave me a whole new appreciation for the Mass. Once you understand what is happening, you can’t be bored. The Creator of the Universe - here with us!

You might try attending daily Mass, as well, if your schedule allows. It is shorter and (in my case) quieter with fewer distractions than a Sunday Mass.


#13

I have three practical suggestions:

  1. The missal presumes that you have done your homework. Learn more about the Mass…that is, the parts that make up the Order of the Mass, what is happening in each part, why it is structured in the way it is, where the rituals came from and what they mean, how it changes from one liturgical season to the next, and so on. Learn about how the liturgical year works.

If you are only understanding about 1/10th of what you hear, of course it is harder to pay attention. (And the more you learn, the more you’ll realize you probably only appreciated about 1/100th of what is in the Mass.) By all means, start with a good book about the Mass. I have not read it, but if I am not mistaken, Karl Keating has written a book on the subject.

  1. Assisting at Mass is more than standing, sitting, and vocally responding at the right times. Listen actively. Listen to the readings as if Father was going to ask you about what was proclaimed. (At our parish, Father sometimes does this during his homily, then teases us about the number of us who have to go back and rifle the missal for the answers!) Better yet, read and reflect upon the readings before you come to Mass, so that you can make eye contact with those reading. There is nothing more depressing than proclaiming the Word of God to a sea of heads turned down to the page or half asleep or looking vaguely around the church as if wishing they were anywhere else than where they were.

Listen to the homily as if you were planning on repeating the main points to someone else or had the assignment of writing an essay on the reflections presented…which I learned to do because I had a friend whose pastor was an awful homilist and my friend wanted to know what my pastor had said.

Likewise, you can find the other parts of the parts that change from week to week on the internet. The opening prayer may touch you more if you have read it before you came.

As you do this, the practice will pull you into listening actively during more and more of the Mass. The words will touch you more, in spite of problems in their delivery and other distractions around you.

  1. Cultivate a gratitude that you can be there. This is one “advantage” that those have who have left the Church and come back over those who have spent years as absentees in all but body. When you sing the Gloria–reflect on how you love God, put a smile on your face, and glorify God! Do this even if it is a matter of “Well, my life isn’t what I’d like, but this much is still great… You are still great, and all power, honor, and glory is still Yours, and that much will never change.”

Also, consider that you may be sleepwalking through life, always needing entertainment, a project, or some other stimulation to get one eye open. It may be that your prayer life and general and Mass in particular are the places where you can’t escape the fact. This goes beyond a spiritual fault to a spiritual illness, something for which you may need to seek healing.

It may also be that you let yourself get so physically or mentally exhausted that you are not able to mount the physical and mental effort required to remain attentive during Mass. “Liturgy” is the work of the faithful. Don’t kid yourself into thinking it takes no toll on you. You need to save some resources within in order to do it. If you find it difficult, examine whether you are caring for yourself well enough.

The tempter will encourage you to avoid the place where the symptoms of your spiritual sleepwalking become obvious even to you. Also, sometimes even those very far advanced spiritually will go through periods of spiritual dryness. During these times religious duties are the first things to seem a chore. Do not punish yourself for spiritual dryness or try to conjure up your own emotional comfort. What is needed is to remain faithful. If you are doing all you can do to be present during Mass and still find it a trial to stay attentive, remain faithful, anyway. Give your best, even if it doesn’t seem like enough. God is pleased with such a sacrifice.


#14

I used to feel the same way until I was guided to concentrate on WHY I go to Mass - it is not for the music or the homily, it is for the Eucharist!

St. Therese used to fall asleep during prayers too!


#15

I used to fall asleep during Mass especially during the homily; however, ever since I’ve started to love reading Bible, I love to listen to the priest. He is really great in giving homily. I regretted that I had slept during his homily before.

If you have not done so, you can start reading daily Bible especially the readings for the day you will attend Mass - meditate on it. When you come to Mass, pay attention to the priest and learn what else he says that did not come up during your Bible reading.


#16

I can hear an echo of my mother here. The answer is “yes” to all of your questions listed above. :thumbsup:

[quote=E.E.N.S]Also your comment, ‘I just kept saying to myself "it’s all about giving God what I owe Him’." Is incorrect. While it is an obligation to attend and to assist attentively at Mass, it is MUCH MORE than just simply giving God His due
[/quote]

We are here on this earth to know, love and serve God. I think the Mass is a good way to do all three. Don’t you? :slight_smile:

[quote=E.E.N.S]and also to say that Mass is boring shows a lack of understanding of what exactly is taking place at Mass. The reality of Mass can be no more boring than being present at Our Lord’s crucifixtion and at the same time being in communion with Him and all of His Angels and Saints in a celebration that takes place at a joining of heaven and earth. The Mass, in its reality, should be the LEAST boring event in our daily lives!
[/quote]

I’m so happy to hear that you don’t think the Mass is boring. Some of us don’t have that luxury, as some of us are experiencing “spiritual dryness”.
I’m glad that you are doing good in your spiritual journey, though. Pray for those of us who aren’t.


#17

When I was going through my spiritual dryness, I would regard anyone guiding me to follow the teachings and parameters of worship established by the Holy Mother Church as somehow being mean, or judgemental, or not truly understanding what I was going through in my spiritual journey. What I know now is that those people were loving and true, that they cared about my immortal soul and that telling me The Truth was the best way they could demonstrate that love.

Alas, I was very selfish and self-centered. How dare they point out to me that I may have received the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of my SAVIOR in a state of mortal/grave sin! How DARE they suggest that I go and receive the Sacrament of Reconcilliation! Don’t they know WHO I AM???

Finally, of course, I had to swallow my pride and begin to practice the Faith as God intends me to practice it - and I take comfort in the fact that one of the best things about being a practicing Catholic is I don’t have to be perfect - I just have to practice, practice, practice…:tiphat:


#18

I can’t really relate to what your saying because I love mass & find it anything but boring… but, my suggestion would be to sit in the front pew. You hopefully won’t be as distracted by others and you can concentrate more fully on what’s going on. I hope this feeling you have passes - until then, just keep going, boring or not. It’s not really about us anyhow.

God Bless,
CM


#19

Random thought…

I don’t know how old you are, and if you go with your family…but find a new Church.

When I was younger we went to Mass at where the priest spoke in a monotone… for the entire mass. No inflection in his voice, nothing. Worse in the summer because the white noise of the fans whirring made it worse, plus the heat… made you want to close your eyes and zone out.

We switched to another parish. When I’m home and go to Chruch, I stay awake. He actively engages you. I don’t always agree with what he’s saying. In fact, more often than not there’s some eye rolling from me during the homily(he’s a movie ruiner), but at least he engages my brain.


#20

If you are bored at Mass, this could be Satan trying to get you not to go.

Please remember that you receive graces just by attending Mass! Especially (I think anyway) when going to Mass is difficult! When I go to Mass and it is beautiful and the sermon is wonderful and the songs are lovely I really feel happy, as would anyone!

But what about those days when I am tired and my kids are whiny so I can’t hear and the sermon is dry and boring and I don’t think I can sit through another minute? I have to believe that God knows how HARD it is for me to sit there…and because I sat through it anyway that he is giving me extra graces and gifts beyond measure!!!

Maybe this is wrong theologically, I don’t know. I just think that if there are two people at Mass and one is completely faith-filled and another one is spiritually dry and bored…that the latter is receiving much more grace from God by sitting through Mass. Because it is so much harder to do, plus I think that person probably needs it. If this is not Church teaching, please ignore me. I like to believe it because I am often bored too I guess.


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