Mass


#1

I am wondering,
Is it true that every mass held in every Church is held at the same time?
Do all of your preist talk about the same scripture as well?
Is the Eucerist given at the same time as well?
I have heard things and I was hoping one of you good people might tell me.
Thanks,
Still seeking!
Allie :rolleyes:


#2

I’m not quite sure that I understand what you are asking.

Mass is celebrated every day all over the world. Each parish has it’s list of Mass times. So it would not be correct to say that every Mass is held at the same time, if that is what you mean.

Every Catholic Church uses the same Lectionary, which is a three year cycle of Mass readings (from the Epistles, Gospels, Psalms, etc.) and so on any given Sunday (or weekday) the same readings would be used at all parishes.

(At least that applies to all of the Roman Rite; I’m not sure about the Eastern Catholic Churches and other Rites.)

And of course, the Eucharist is celebrated at every Mass.

But somehow I think I am missing the intent of your question.


#3

Yeah, i think it would be very hard to synchronize all the masses, albeit interesting. But the important thing is that it is celebrated around the world every day. :thumbsup:


#4

The really great thing about the Catholic mass schedule around the world is that it is the only form of worship that fits perfectly with the prophecy of Malachi 1:11 which says, “For from the rising of the sun to its setting my name is great among the nations, and in every place incense is offered to my name, and a pure offering; for my name is great among the nations, says the Lord of hosts.” This prophecy is also the basis for one of our frequently used Eucharistic prayers.


#5

[quote=dafalax]Yeah, i think it would be very hard to synchronize all the masses, albeit interesting. But the important thing is that it is celebrated around the world every day. :thumbsup:
[/quote]

And taking into consideration time zones, it is conceivable that. at any one time, there is always a Mass being celebrated somewhere on Earth. Pretty awesome thought.


#6

[quote=allisonP]I am wondering,
Is it true that every mass held in every Church is held at the same time?
Do all of your preist talk about the same scripture as well?
Is the Eucerist given at the same time as well?
I have heard things and I was hoping one of you good people might tell me.
Thanks,
Still seeking!
Allie :rolleyes:
[/quote]

Hi Allie!
Although there is no doubt that there is a Mass in progress somewhere in the world all the time, (In much the same way as there is no doubt someone walking or eating somewhere all the time), they are not “synchronized” as you have been told.

The Mass readings for each day are the same all over…
Here they are: Daily Mass Readings. Though the readings are the same, each priest gives his homily from whatever he decides to do it on. Most often (In my parish) they tie the readings together and teach us something about how to better live for Our Lord.

Needless to say, the Eucharist is not “synchronized” either.

I hope this helps you my friend!
Pax tecum,


#7

Thank you all.
I know that sometimes my questions are a tad silly, and this one was really nonesential but I asked anyway and you all were kind enough to take the time to answer! :smiley:
I think it is wonderful that the same verse is read everywhere.
Maybe that was what I had heard.
Allie :thumbsup:


#8

In a metaphysical sense, I think Mass is held at the same time. When we receive the Eucharsist, we are receiving Christ’s perfect sacrifice and at that moment we are one with God. So we’re sort of “out of time” in the physical way of thinking about time. Sorry I’m not really making any sense; can anyone else describe it better than me?


#9

[quote=Pax]The really great thing about the Catholic mass schedule around the world is that it is the only form of worship that fits perfectly with the prophecy of Malachi 1:11 which says, “For from the rising of the sun to its setting my name is great among the nations, and in every place incense is offered to my name, and a pure offering; for my name is great among the nations, says the Lord of hosts.” This prophecy is also the basis for one of our frequently used Eucharistic prayers.
[/quote]

When I first learned of this verse in Malachi, it made my jaw drop…I love it. It’s truly amazing when you put the pieces of God’s plan together.


#10

[quote=allisonP]Thank you all.
I know that sometimes my questions are a tad silly, and this one was really nonesential but I asked anyway and you all were kind enough to take the time to answer! :smiley:
I think it is wonderful that the same verse is read everywhere.
Maybe that was what I had heard.
Allie :thumbsup:
[/quote]

Just a further explanation of the Liturgy of the Word: every Mass has a reading (two on Sundays and Holy Days) from the Bible; followed by the singing or reading from one of the Psalms; followed (with greater ceremony) with a reading from one of the four Gospels. I mention this because non-Catholics sometimes think that Catholics don’t know the Bible, but in fact a great deal of it is read in Mass, and over a period of time the person in the pews hears most of it (though they should be reading it on their own, of course, outside of Mass).

God bless!


#11

Jabronie I think I understand your angle. Mass is the representation of the Sacrifce. As the Sacrifice occured once.But since God created time and is not bound by its rules the Mass then would include all Masses past present and future. so in that line of thinking all Masses are occuring at the same “time” and Christ having suffered died and rose once is continually offered to God the Father.

Now do I have something wrong?


#12

[quote=hilde the dog]Jabronie I think I understand your angle. Mass is the representation of the Sacrifce. As the Sacrifice occured once.But since God created time and is not bound by its rules the Mass then would include all Masses past present and future. so in that line of thinking all Masses are occuring at the same “time” and Christ having suffered died and rose once is continually offered to God the Father.

Now do I have something wrong?
[/quote]

Right, when the bread and wine become the Body and Blood of our Lord, I feel like we are right there at the last supper. We participate in His sacrifice when we receive Communion. So it’s like we are outside of time while we are one with God, who Himself is outside of time.


#13

Allison,
Great questions! Here are some quick answers.
Is it true that every mass held in every Church is held at the same time? Is the Eucharist given at the same time as well?
No, there are masses at different times in neighboring parishes, and in turn all around the world. The masses are not synched up in this manner at all. Are the masses the same, yes but timing is not the issue. Some masses in the early morning do not have music, just a shortened mass with a short homily, it takes about 20 minutes. Its nice if your in a hurry but still want to take part in the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.
**Do all of your priest talk about the same scripture as well? **
Yes, I just taught this in freshman catechism class last weekend. The “Ordo” (which is latin for Order) is followed by the Catholic Church all over the world. This allows the same readings to be read in every Church on a given day.
The Sunday Ordo is in a 3 year cycle. In year A most of the gospel readings are from the gospel according to Matthew. In year B most of the gospel readings are from the gospel according to Mark. In year C most of the gospel readings are from the gospel according to Luke. Readings from the gospel according to John are spread over all 3 years. Sunday readings are further divided into seasons of the Church year: Advent, Christmas, Lent, Triduum, Easter and Ordinary time.
The first reading at Sunday Mass correlates with the gospel passage for that day. The first reading helps those gathered to see the ways God remembered and acted in the lives of His people and how the Old and New Testaments are related. The second Sunday reading is usually from the New Testament letters, tends to be consecutive in order so that after three years all the letters will be read.
The Ordo arranges the weekday readings in a two year cycle – Year I and Year II. Usually there are only two readings at the weekday Masses. The first reading is either from the Old Testament, a New Testament letter, the Acts of the Apostles, or the Book of Revelation. The second reading is always from one of the gospels. Here is a Link to today’s readings.
When my family and I go on vacation, we have the same readings and Mass even though it is 800 miles from home and in a different country, the only difference would be the language of the Mass. Traditions like these are why I have a love for Christ’s Universal Church, the Catholic Church.
If you have any more questions please do not hesitate to post them.

 Peace,

David


#14

[quote=allisonP]Thank you all.
I know that sometimes my questions are a tad silly, and this one was really nonesential but I asked anyway and you all were kind enough to take the time to answer! :smiley:
I think it is wonderful that the same verse is read everywhere.
Maybe that was what I had heard.
Allie :thumbsup:
[/quote]

You are NOT asking silly questions! Sometimes, after I write a question down I realize “Oh, wait! Time Zones!”. But I understood what you were asking. Sure, somewhere, everywhere a Mass is being said. And when a Mass is being said, we are all joined with all the members of the Body of Christ in the celebration. It is a mystical joining and it gives me CHILLS sometimes when I think about the incredible unity that is the Catholic Church!


#15

If you read Scott Hahn’s book The Lamb’s Supper it points out that not only does the Mass put us at the foot of the Cross on Calvary, participating in the Supreme Sacrifice where Jesus is both victim and High Priest, we are also present in Heaven, in a mystical way, at the Marriage Feast of the Lamb.

All the Masses that were ever said over the past 2000 years, and all those still to come, combine with the Sacrifice on Calvary. At least that’s the way I see it.


#16

[quote=allisonP]I am wondering,
Is it true that every mass held in every Church is held at the same time?
Do all of your preist talk about the same scripture as well?
Is the Eucerist given at the same time as well?
I have heard things and I was hoping one of you good people might tell me.
Thanks,
Still seeking!
Allie :rolleyes:
[/quote]

I think the point of the question is that you have probably heard that we participate together in the liturgy. There is one liturgy. Every sunday we participate in the same liturgy that we participated in the week before. It takes place in eternity and we become united with God. It is when heaven meets earth. So yes, every mass on earth occurs at the same time.


#17

Here’s a thought:

The Holy Mass, the Last Supper, the Crucifixion of our dear Lord Jesus Christ, The Marriage with the Lamb in Heaven is one piece. One Piece. “The New and Everlasting Covenant.” This is universal unity. A great mystery indeed. Very beautiful.

in XT.


closed #18

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