Mass


#1

What is it that Cathilcs call the “MASS” and is it not killing Jesus all over again.Thank You.


#2

Here is a great link that explains the Mass and answers your question:

catholic.com/thisrock/1990/9006chap.asp

A quote from this particular article is:

Frank Sheed summarizes Catholic teaching on the point in Theology and Sanity:

“There is no new slaying of Christ in the Mass…Yet that it is the Christ who was slain upon Calvary is shown sacramentally by the separate consecration of bread to become His body and wine to become His blood. The essence of the Mass is that Christ is making an offering to the Father of Himself, who was slain for us upon Calvary. The Mass is Calvary, as Christ now offers it to His Father.”

The English word “Mass” comes from the concluding words of the Latin Liturgy "Ite, missa est" which is roughly translated as "go, it is ended. The ancient Christians referred to the Mass as the Eucharist, or the Liturgy and you will often hear Catholic Christians doing the same today.

The first Mass was the Last Supper, celebrated by Jesus Himself.

I hope this helps you in your search for, and understanding of, the fullness of the faith!


#3

Hebrews 9:25-26: “Nor was it to offer himself repeatedly, as the high priest enters the Holy Place yearly with blood not his own; for then he would have had to suffer repeatedly since the foundation of the world.”

Revelation 5:6: “And between the throne and the four living creatures and among the elders, I saw a Lamb standing, as though it had been slain…”

Jesus’ sacrifice is the one perfect offering that He continually presents in heaven – a perpetual sacrifice. Thus the image of the “Lamb who has been slain” in Revelation. You cannot repeat that which never ends. The Mass is not a re-sacrificing because it is a celebration of Jesus’ perpetual sacrifice for us.


#4

Well said. Another thing to keep in mind is the Passover feast. The Jews considered this to be a Tzikkaron (no clue on the spelling, just trying to spell phonetically) event. This is how Israel understands its liberation from Egypt: every time Passover is celebrated, the Exodus events are made present to the memory of believers so that they may conform their lives to them.

The Jews believed a past event was made present in the Passover. The eucharist is the fulfillment of this.


#5

No offense, Will, but you seem to have a history of posting a very broad question and then not coming back to discuss it.

If you really want thorough answers, revisit threads you’ve started and respond to the people who have taken the time to try to help you find answers. Your questions will then get a lot more activity.

If you are not really interested in the answers or discussion, perhaps you should reconsider your posts.

Peace to you,
javelin


#6

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