May I recieve the Eucharist tomorrow?

Hi!

I am an Anglican convert to Roman Catholicism. I have NOT been confirmed or officially "welcomed" into the church. In all humility, I am very aware of the Catholic teachings about what the Eucharist is and accept them all fully. I have had a valid baptism and intend to get confirmed as a catholic ASAP. May I recieve the Eucharist at tomorrow's mass?

[quote="fireproofpoodle, post:1, topic:177173"]
Hi!

I am an Anglican convert to Roman Catholicism. I have NOT been confirmed or officially "welcomed" into the church. In all humility, I am very aware of the Catholic teachings about what the Eucharist is and accept them all fully. I have had a valid baptism and intend to get confirmed as a catholic ASAP. May I recieve the Eucharist at tomorrow's mass?

[/quote]

It's not a matter of a valid baptism or being confirmed for that matter.

You need to prepare for your entrance into the Church (likely via RCIA) and your first communion (at which time you will likely be confirmed as well.) Holy Communion is one as the Sacraments of the Church -- separate but certainly related to the sacraments of baptism and confirmation

So no, you may not yet receive Holy Communion just yet -- but you can engage in a spiritual communion with Jesus and you are welcome at the great majority of Catholic parishes to process up for a blessing from a priest or deacon during communion.

I would advise you to contact your priest first. The Catholic Church recognises your baptism as valid, and I'm quite sure that you wouldn't have to go through the full RCIA process since you would not be a Catechumen. However, though I don't know what form it would take, you will probably have to undertake catechetical instruction first. The celebration of the Sacrament of Reconciliation is usually a prerequisite for receiving Holy Communion. For adult converts I think that the Sacrament of Confirmation, which completes the grace of Baptism, is normally celebrated and then the Holy Eucharist is received by those who have been confirmed..

By all means, go to Mass - in fact, go as often as you can - but do not receive Holy Communion until you have discussed your intentions re conversion with your priest.

[quote="fireproofpoodle, post:1, topic:177173"]
Hi!

I am an Anglican convert to Roman Catholicism. I have NOT been confirmed or officially "welcomed" into the church. In all humility, I am very aware of the Catholic teachings about what the Eucharist is and accept them all fully. I have had a valid baptism and intend to get confirmed as a catholic ASAP. May I recieve the Eucharist at tomorrow's mass?

[/quote]

No.

You need to talk to a priest to have him welcome you in or set you on the path to it, depending on your understanding of the faith, and go to Confession first at the very least. I don't know if RCIA or some other program of study will be necessary in your case or not, the priest will evaluate it. :)

They say anticipation makes the heart grow fonder. I know it does in cases like these. :D

May I add, you should choose a traditional parish so that you get a reliable priest who will judge your state of the faith accurately. You shouldn't play dice with your soul.

I would definitely wait till you go through RCIA and get confirmed as a Catholic first. Remember, the Anglican's sacrament of confirmation is invalid because they have invalid holy orders.

[quote="NPC, post:3, topic:177173"]
I would advise you to contact your priest first. The Catholic Church recognises your baptism as valid, and I'm quite sure that you wouldn't have to go through the full RCIA process since you would not be a Catechumen. However, though I don't know what form it would take, you will probably have to undertake catechetical instruction first. The celebration of the Sacrament of Reconciliation is usually a prerequisite for receiving Holy Communion. For adult converts I think that the Sacrament of Confirmation, which completes the grace of Baptism, is normally celebrated and then the Holy Eucharist is received by those who have been confirmed..

By all means, go to Mass - in fact, go as often as you can - but do not receive Holy Communion until you have discussed your intentions re conversion with your priest.

[/quote]

This may have changed very recently for Anglicans but even a month ago the typical way for a validly baptized Protestant to enter the Church would have been through RCIA.

Holy Communion is a separate sacrament from that of confirmation.

[quote="Shin, post:4, topic:177173"]
...May I add, you should choose a traditional parish so that you get a reliable priest who will judge your state of the faith accurately. You shouldn't play dice with your soul.

[/quote]

I really don't know what a "traditional parish" is but any Catholic parish in GOOD standing with the Church will more than suffice. A non-traditional parish is no greater risk to one's soul than a "traditional parish" that's for certain.

[quote="Hotchkiss, post:7, topic:177173"]
I really don't know what a "traditional parish" is but any Catholic parish in GOOD standing with the Church will more than suffice. A non-traditional parish is no greater risk to one's soul than a "traditional parish" that's for certain.

[/quote]

I fear this is a statement in denial of the sad facts: there are many parishes throughout the Church with priests who are not in fact, performing their duties in the fullest unity with the Church, but nevertheless are not disciplined, for various reasons.

We have to embrace the Church upon entering her with all her goods and all her imperfect members. And lest you do not believe this is the case, pick up a newspaper and read it.

It is also a simple matter of fact, that a more traditional parish is less likely to embrace changes to doctrine all that of which are not acceptable, but a 'progressive' would view as acceptable. Traditionalists are less susceptible to bad change.

I would agree with the previous posters. I am also a convert from the Anglican church, but did not complete the conversion until I had gone through RCIA, participated in Reconciliation, been confirmed and received my first Catholic Eucharist.
By all means, discuss this further with your priest and follow his direction.
Best wishes to you.
Leslie

[quote="fireproofpoodle, post:1, topic:177173"]
Hi!

I am an Anglican convert to Roman Catholicism. I have NOT been confirmed or officially "welcomed" into the church. In all humility, I am very aware of the Catholic teachings about what the Eucharist is and accept them all fully. I have had a valid baptism and intend to get confirmed as a catholic ASAP. May I recieve the Eucharist at tomorrow's mass?

[/quote]

no not unless and until the pastor of the Catholic parish where you would like to enter the Catholic Church has invited you and discerned that you are worthily disposed and properly prepared. That is the same rule that applies to Catholics by the way.

[quote="Hotchkiss, post:6, topic:177173"]
This may have changed very recently for Anglicans but even a month ago the typical way for a validly baptized Protestant to enter the Church would have been through RCIA..

[/quote]

As I said, the O.P. would likely have to have catechetical instruction, but the process is not supposed to be the same as that which Catechumens go through - id est, to restate what I said earlier, where the person's baptism is regarded as valid, it is not necessary to go through the full RCIA process. In paragraph 100 of Principles and Norms on Ecumenism it is clearly stated that there is to be a clear distinction made between those who are Catechumens and those who have already received valid baptism. The Liturgy Office in the UK has quite a good document here which has a short and to the point section on those who have already been baptised (beginning at page 41).

[quote="Hotchkiss, post:6, topic:177173"]
Holy Communion is a separate sacrament from that of confirmation.

[/quote]

Is that for my benefit, or a general point of information?:confused:

[quote="fireproofpoodle, post:1, topic:177173"]
Hi!

I am an Anglican convert to Roman Catholicism. I have NOT been confirmed or officially "welcomed" into the church. In all humility, I am very aware of the Catholic teachings about what the Eucharist is and accept them all fully. I have had a valid baptism and intend to get confirmed as a catholic ASAP. May I recieve the Eucharist at tomorrow's mass?

[/quote]

NO, not until after your Rite of Reception into full Catholic union.

\
I am an Anglican convert to Roman Catholicism. I have NOT been confirmed or officially "welcomed" into the church.\

**Converting is NOT a unilateral decision on your part.

What you are saying actually means no more than, "I WANT to convert to Roman Catholicism."**

[quote="Hotchkiss, post:2, topic:177173"]
So no, you may not yet receive Holy Communion just yet -- but you can engage in a spiritual communion with Jesus and you are welcome at the great majority of Catholic parishes to process up for a blessing from a priest or deacon during communion.

[/quote]

With all due respect, while you mean well, your last paragraph is incorrect and would cause the OP more harm than good.

Exactly a year ago, the Congregatiaon for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments issued five observations regarding this very bad practice. The CDWDS gave five solid reasons as to why this should not be done:

  1. The liturgical blessing of the Holy Mass is properly given to each and to all at the conclusion of the Mass, just a few moments subsequent to the distribution of Holy Communion.

  2. Lay people, within the context of Holy Mass, are unable to confer blessings. These blessings, rather, are the competence of the priest (cf. Ecclesia de Mysterio, Notitiae 34 (15 Aug. 1997), art. 6, § 2; Canon 1169, § 2; and Roman Ritual De Benedictionibus (1985), n. 18).

  3. Furthermore, the laying on of a hand or hands — which has its own sacramental significance, inappropriate here — by those distributing Holy Communion, in substitution for its reception, is to be explicitly discouraged.

  4. The Apostolic Exhortation Familiaris Consortio n. 84, “forbids any pastor, for whatever reason to pretext even of a pastoral nature, to perform ceremonies of any kind for divorced people who remarry”. To be feared is that any form of blessing in substitution for communion would give the impression that the divorced and remarried have been returned, in some sense, to the status of Catholics in good standing.

  5. **In a similar way, for others who are not to be admitted to Holy Communion in accord with the norm of law, the Church’s discipline has already made clear that they should not approach Holy Communion nor receive a blessing. This would include non-Catholics **and those envisaged in can. 915 (i.e., those under the penalty of excommunication or interdict, and others who obstinately persist in manifest grave sin).

The OP, since he has not been received into the Church, falls under the fifth observation. The OP will certainly receive a blessing at the end of Mass when everyone else will.

Please, we need to make sure that we are on the same page as the CDWDS when giving advice, lest we cause confusion.

[quote="fireproofpoodle, post:1, topic:177173"]
Hi!

I am an Anglican convert to Roman Catholicism. I have NOT been confirmed or officially "welcomed" into the church. In all humility, I am very aware of the Catholic teachings about what the Eucharist is and accept them all fully. I have had a valid baptism and intend to get confirmed as a catholic ASAP. May I recieve the Eucharist at tomorrow's mass?

[/quote]

You may not yet receive.
I was a baptised Methodist. Like anyone who is not Catholic I had to go through the RCIA program which lasts up to one year (maybe a bit shorter depending on when it starts) and then at Easter those who are not baptised get baptised and those like you and I do not get baptised (because we already have a valid baptism) get formally received into the Catholic Church. Then you may receive.

[quote="fireproofpoodle, post:1, topic:177173"]
Hi!

I am an Anglican convert to Roman Catholicism. I have NOT been confirmed or officially "welcomed" into the church. In all humility, I am very aware of the Catholic teachings about what the Eucharist is and accept them all fully. I have had a valid baptism and intend to get confirmed as a catholic ASAP. May I recieve the Eucharist at tomorrow's mass?

[/quote]

No....not yet. When the time comes that you are truly ready, you'll be received into the Church, receive First Holy Communion, and Confirmation. Trying to rush that process would not be a good thing. Here's what you said in your own post "I am very aware of the Catholic teachings about what the Eucharist is and accept them all fully." Do keep in mind that part of that Catholic teaching on the Eucharist is that one must be in Communion before receiving Communion.

[quote="Shin, post:8, topic:177173"]
I fear this is a statement in denial of the sad facts: there are many parishes throughout the Church with priests who are not in fact, performing their duties in the fullest unity with the Church, but nevertheless are not disciplined, for various reasons.

We have to embrace the Church upon entering her with all her goods and all her imperfect members. And lest you do not believe this is the case, pick up a newspaper and read it.

It is also a simple matter of fact, that a more traditional parish is less likely to embrace changes to doctrine all that of which are not acceptable, but a 'progressive' would view as acceptable. Traditionalists are less susceptible to bad change.

[/quote]

No, it's not "a matter of fact." Not at all.

I attend a parish (not my home parish but it's very convenient) that considers itself to be extremely "traditional." It's not all that orthodox however. Sadly the semblance of traditionalism in no way guarantees actual orthodoxy.

[quote="benedictgal, post:14, topic:177173"]
With all due respect, while you mean well, your last paragraph is incorrect and would cause the OP more harm than good.

Exactly a year ago, the Congregatiaon for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments issued five observations regarding this very bad practice. The CDWDS gave five solid reasons as to why this should not be done:

The OP, since he has not been received into the Church, falls under the fifth observation. The OP will certainly receive a blessing at the end of Mass when everyone else will.

Please, we need to make sure that we are on the same page as the CDWDS when giving advice, lest we cause confusion.

[/quote]

It's not incorrect and it certainly will not cause the OP any harm.

Non-Catholics are specifically WELCOMED to receive a blessing at every parish in my diocese per my bishop. He's the law here not the CDWDS. They are WELCOMED in just about ever other parish I have ever visited as well. Nothing wrong with it in the least so long as there is not a local prohibition which would be extremely rare in the USA. If a pastor or bishop did not like it I would definitely comply otherwise I accept the generous offer of my bishop.

[quote="Hotchkiss, post:18, topic:177173"]
It's not incorret and it certainly will not cause the OP any harm.

Non-Catholics are WELCOMED to receive a blessing at every parish in my diocese per my bishop. They are WELCOMED in just about ever other parish I have ever visited as well. Nothing wrong with it in the least so long as there is not a local prohibition which would be extremely rare in the USA.

[/quote]

It is incorrect. With all due respect, you may not be aware that the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments is the Holy See. The Holy See is the final word on these matters, not the bishop. The CDWDS acts in the name of the Holy Father. It acts in collaboration with him.

A bishop's authority is limited. He cannot add something to the Mass on his own authority. In fact, the way that something is added is if it receives the necessary 2/3 vote of the Latin Rite bishops and then is sent to Rome for the recognitio (as was the case with the translations). The CDWDS, while studying this matter, has stated that this should not be done and it has given five solid reasons against it.

This is beyond a local prohibition, since this comes from Rome.

We line up to receive Someone, not something. It is poor catechesis to think that a blessing will substitute for receiving Our Lord. Furthermore, the issue has nothing to do with inclusivity, since everyone will be receiving the blessing at the end of Mass, be that person Catholic, Protestant, atheist or whomever.

[quote="benedictgal, post:19, topic:177173"]
It is incorrect. With all due respect, you may not be aware that the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments is the Holy See. The Holy See is the final word on these matters, not the bishop. The CDWDS acts in the name of the Holy Father.

A bishop's authority is limited. He cannot add something to the Mass on his own authority. The CDWDS, while studying this matter, has stated that this should not be done and it has given five solid reasons against it.

This is beyond a local prohibition, since this comes from Rome.

[/quote]

Again, my bishop is the law here. If I'm not mistaken he reports directly to the Pope not the CDWDS. It's his call here locally.

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