Meaning of 'full consent of the will'

I’m hoping someone here can enlighten me as to what it means to commit an act with ‘full consent of the will’ as it relates to committing mortal sin.

forums.catholic.com/showpost.php?p=3917512&postcount=17

Thanks.

I’m not sure if you want an answere from someone on that thread, but I’ll answer anyway. Full consent of the will in relation to mortal sin is simply that you have to 100% want to commit that sin. If you try at all to avoid the sin, then you are not in full consent of the will. You have to actually try though. Hope that helps.:slight_smile:

That is a tough question which, without amazingly clear self-insight, can only be answered in general terms which would probably not be helpful because then you would have to understand with full clarity those as well.

I think you can make a good start on answering your question by saying what is NOT full consent of the will. Things such as addictions, coerced decisions, distractions, having to make decisions involving others (a single person generally has more full consent of the will than a married person), attempts to pick lesser of two evils, are NOT full consent. This list can probably be greatly expanded upon.

Pray that God will make that understanding known to you (then share it with the rest of us :slight_smile: ) so that you can better inform your conscience. I will pray for that grace for you too.

P.S. I enjoyed your devil & pitchfork comment from the other thread - made me laugh.

You could also add mental illness to the list.

**1859 **Mortal sin requires full knowledge and complete consent. It presupposes knowledge of the sinful character of the act, of its opposition to God’s law. It also implies a consent sufficiently deliberate to be a personal choice. Feigned ignorance and hardness of heart do not diminish, but rather increase, the voluntary character of a sin.

**Bolding **mine.

So what does it mean to be “sufficiently deliberate to be a personal choice?” Bbentrup made a good start. To give full consent of the will, you essentially have to decide that you know better than God - but even that choice can be “coerced” by (as Geek said) mental illness.

You cannot be **forced **to commit a mortal sin, because being forced means you did **not **give that full and free consent. It may have been full consent, but it was not free.

You can take my argument too far, and say that there is, therefore, no mortal sin at all. That is not true! We can make that choice to defy God fully and freely - almost any Catholic that has, provides, assists in, or helps someone get an abortion does just that.

YSIC,

Ruthie

You would have to understand the action is wrong and mentally agree within yourself to do the wrong thing. You do not have to complete the action only commit yourself to it. This is a controversial subject you may want to read the threads on acceptable lying it is the same core subject. Throughout church history there has been continuous disagreement.

Assuming no addiction or other mental incapacity, then the very fact a person knows the Church teaches something is a grave sin then that is sufficient as “full knowledge”. Remember understanding is not required although that should be sought if a person does not understand a teaching.

I don’t wanto start another thread, so I will just put my doubt here.
I made something that can be a mortal sin, but I am not sure of I was really consenting…I realized what I had done only when I was finished, and I almost cried when the truth fell on me. I acted on impulse, I didn’t really feel like I was under control of my own self. Is this considered an act with full consent of the will?

A mortal sin cannot be committed by accident. If you know an action is grave/serious and you do it anyway then that’s a mortal sin unless you were somehow coerced into it.
You should go and see your priest.

Thanks! I’ll go as soon as possible.

Please understand, I adore everybody’s input on the subject. But I am in a dilemma concerning mortal sin. I am now confessing everything. I really need to know what the One Holy Catholic Church through the Catechism of the Catholic Church TEACHES as a definition of “Full Consent of the Will”. I have opinion on the matter as well. I do not want to share it, as it may be completely off base to what the Church teaches. Not being overly shy and want to get over my sinfulness, I have a problem with masturbation. I don’t do it all that often any more, I can go weeks at a time without. but then all of a sudden many times in a row. Is this really Catholic ANSWERS or Catholics with opinions? And I really really don’t want to offend anyone. I am desperately trying to learn what our Faith teaches. Is there anyone who can tell me where in the Catechism of the One Holy Catholic Church the definition of “full consent of the will” means? I honestly feel like I kill Jesus Christ when I commit a mortal sin. I have an examination of conscience book that tells me, we are a whole lot worse people than we thought we were.

You won’t find sympathy for bad habits on here.

Best wishes,
Padster

Its not complicated although some people try to make it complicated to justify continuing to sin.
Full consent of the will simply means deliberately committing an act. You cannot commit a mortal sin by accident.

CCC 1859 Mortal sin requires full knowledge and complete consent. It presupposes knowledge of the sinful character of the act, of its opposition to God’s law. It also implies a consent sufficiently deliberate to be a personal choice. Feigned ignorance and hardness of heart do not diminish, but rather increase, the voluntary character of a sin.

Thistle is correct.

Best wishes,
Padster

Such would be a simplification and not entirely on mark I would not recommend all there as a guide and various things would need to be discussed further etc. But I will leave it at that and do not wish to discuss such further. One may discuss with a confessor if one has questions about a particular sin.

:thumbsup:

scborromeo.org/ccc/p3s1c1a8.htm#IV

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