Meaning of what Jesus said to Judas?


#1

Hi CAF!

Quesiton for y’all. In my Bible, in Matthew’s Gospel, I read Jesus saying to Judas in the garden, “Friend, do what you have come for.”

What could this mean? Is Jesus telling Judas to do something evil?

Or, as I think, could it mean that Jesus is telling Judas to live out his calling, which he promptly fails to do?

Thanks.
n


#2

Matthew 26:25

25 Judas, who betrayed him, said, “Is it I, Master?” He said to him, “You have said so."

John 13:27

27 Then after the morsel, Satan entered into him. Jesus said to him, “What you are going to do, do quickly.”

According to the commentary in my Navarre New Testament:
The morsel (at the last supper) Jesus offers Judas is a sign of friendship, an invitation to him to give up his evil plotting. Judas rejects the chance he is offered. St Augustine says what he received was good but he received it to his own perdition because he was evil. Satan entering him means that from that moment Judas gave in completely to the Devil’s temptation…

…These details have been shared so we will bare no ill will against those who wrong us. Christ washed Judas feet, reproved him without bitterness, ministered to him, allowed him to share his table and his kiss. Judas did not become better but Jesus persevered in his course of action


#3

I could be wrong, but I think it is just Jesus resigned to his fate and resigned to what Judas has intended to do.

“Friend, do what you have come for” could be just Jesus saying “Get on with it… do what you intend to do.”

While Jesus had to die, I don’t think that Judas betraying him with a kiss was ever part of any divine plan.


#4

Thanks all.

I think I like Casilda’s reply better…I don’t want to imagine Jesus being resigned to his fate & telling Judas to “get on with it *.”

Thank you.*


#5

=nqes7t9;13444162]Hi CAF!

Quesiton for y’all. In my Bible, in Matthew’s Gospel, I read Jesus saying to Judas in the garden, “Friend, do what you have come for.”

What could this mean? Is Jesus telling Judas to do something evil?

Or, as I think, could it mean that Jesus is telling Judas to live out his calling, which he promptly fails to do?

Thanks.
n

No:) While God can permit evil; being GOD; he cannot cause it to happen:thumbsup:

Jesus was:

1.Telling Judas that he knew beforehand about his betrayal

  1. He was saying by calling Judas “friend” that he [Jesus] still loved Judas despite what he was doing, and urging him to REPENT.

God Bless you,
Patrick


#6

#7

I do think that God’s Plans must include evil being done. God doesn’t force evil to be done, but has everyone’s misdeeds carefully predicted, accounted, and effects known.

Judas was both free never to have betrayed Jesus and at the same time God knew he would be the betrayer and planned for it.

Same for Mary, Mother of God, she was free to choose to be the “handmaiden of the Lord” and God knew she would say yes and birth Jesus etc.

Otherwise, there is no credit for Mary or true betrayal by Judas, but each of these is real conduct just as the Bible tells. They each are responsible and should be celebrated and given remorse over for their real choices.

Foreknowledge by God and any number of persons who know a real prophecy does not force any such decision or action to happen. All things done are done freely and I’m very thankful that God is capable of navigating history through all the good and bad choices we make.


#8

The tricky part is what does Judas think? Does he wrongly think it is forced upon him? Does he think that Jesus gave him permission? Does he think he must go through with it and think that it will do some great good?

There are lots of ways to guess what might be on his mind beyond 30 pieces of silver.

All these are possible, but in the end he does not seek forgiveness and instead in the freedom of his own actions kills himself. So, in the end it doesn’t matter; he gave up on himself. He well could have been redeemed rather than, “worse than if he had never been born.” Yet, Jesus knew he would not and said this about Judas.


#9

D-R Bible, Haydock Commentary:

John 13:

Ver. 27. Satan entered into him, who presently went out with great anger and indignation. It was then night, likely about nine o’clock. (Witham) — That which thou dost, do quickly. It is not a license, much less a command, to go about his treason: but a signification to him, that Christ would not hinder or resist what he was about, do it as soon as he pleased: but was both ready, and desirous to suffer for our redemption. (Challoner) — Christ does not by these words exhort the traitor, much less command him, to perform his wicked deed; but he means to reprobate it, and at the same time testify that he would not hinder his being betrayed. (St. Chrysostom, hom. lxxi. in Joan.) — It is the voice not of command, but of permission, not of a person in fear, but of one prepared for death. (St. Leo)


#10

Ver. 27.*Satan entered into him,*who presently went out with great anger and indignation. It was then night, likely about nine o’clock. (Witham) —*That which thou dost, do quickly.*It is not a license, much less a command, to go about his treason: but a signification to him, that Christ would not hinder or resist what he was about, do it as soon as he pleased: but was both ready, and desirous to suffer for our redemption. (Challoner) — Christ does not by these words exhort the traitor, much less command him, to perform his wicked deed; but he means to reprobate it, and at the same time testify that he would not hinder his being betrayed. (St. Chrysostom, hom. lxxi. in Joan.) — It is the voice not of command, but of permission, not of a person in fear, but of one prepared for death. (St. Leo)


#11

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