Meat List for Lent?

I’m a relatively new Catholic (baptised last Easter), so I’m still getting used to abstaining from meat on Fridays. I’m still a little confused about what exactly qualifies as meat. For me, meat has basically just been a synonym for protein.

I know that fish is not considered a meat, but is there anything else that breathes that is not considered a meat? Could anyone point me to an official list of what to avoid or what is allowed?

thanks in advance :slight_smile:

[quote=pacersFan]I’m a relatively new Catholic (baptised last Easter), so I’m still getting used to abstaining from meat on Fridays. I’m still a little confused about what exactly qualifies as meat. For me, meat has basically just been a synonym for protein.

I know that fish is not considered a meat, but is there anything else that breathes that is not considered a meat? Could anyone point me to an official list of what to avoid or what is allowed?

thanks in advance :slight_smile:
[/quote]

Here’s an article that summerizes the Lenten season fairly well.

americancatholic.org/Features/lent/faqle9902.asp

As to the question concerning breathing things, remember that plants breath and are allowed. As far as animals are concerned, they are all “meat.” Fish are allowed. I have also heard (though I am not sure about this one) that frogs legs are allowed. I think that I’ll stick with fish personally. Take care and God bless.

The explanation from the 1917 Code of Canon Law is a little more explicit:

Canon 1250. The law of abstinence prohibits meat and soups made of meat but not of eggs, milks, and other condiments, even if taken from animals.
Recently in the “Ask an Apologist” Forum, Father Vincent Serpa stated that chicken broth is allowed, so either the restrictions are now more forgiving or chicken broth is not considered “soup made from meat”.

[quote=msproule]The explanation from the 1917 Code of Canon Law is a little more explicit:

Canon 1250. The law of abstinence prohibits meat and soups made of meat but not of eggs, milks, and other condiments, even if taken from animals.
Recently in the “Ask an Apologist” Forum, Father Vincent Serpa stated that chicken broth is allowed, so either the restrictions are now more forgiving or chicken broth is not considered “soup made from meat”.
[/quote]

I have heard just the opposite that broth made from meat stock is not allowed. I am wondering if this included broth made from beef and pork. If so, hello scheshwan shrimp for dinner.

PF

The world’s largest rodent, capybara is approved for Lent.rebsig.com/capybara/capymeat.html

http://images.snapfish.com/346446943fp335>nu%3D3239>5<%3B>787>WSNRCG%3D3233564232976nu0mrj

Don’t think I want to eat any.

I think “meat” in the Catholic sense only refers to mammals and birds. Therefore fish, reptiles, insects, and a wide variety of other proteiny things are still allowed.

Concerning soups, it is my understanding whereas soup made from meat had traditionally been banned, this practiced was recently reversed.

Josh

meat for the purposes of Lenten abstinence means the flesh of warm blooded animals and fowl. Fish and cold-blooded animals such as frog-legs are allowed. I used to like froglegs until I saw the Muppet Movie but Kermit ruined it for me with all those froggies hobbling around on crutches.

[quote=WanderAimlessly]I have heard just the opposite that broth made from meat stock is not allowed. I am wondering if this included broth made from beef and pork.
[/quote]

We got into the argument (oops, I mean dialogue) about chicken broth at last Friday’s Fish Fry.

I later read Father Vincent Serpa’s answer on the CA Forums and according to him it is allowed. However, he did not provide a reference…
:wink:
Personally, I would rather see a more explicit list as was found in the original 1917 Code of Canon Law.

[quote=msproule]The explanation from the 1917 Code of Canon Law is a little more explicit:

Canon 1250. The law of abstinence prohibits meat and soups made of meat but not of eggs, milks, and other condiments, even if taken from animals.

Recently in the “Ask an Apologist” Forum, Father Vincent Serpa stated that chicken broth is allowed, so either the restrictions are now more forgiving or chicken broth is not considered “soup made from meat”.
[/quote]

I have been told, by a canon lawyer, that the fact that the reference to soup was specific deleted from the new code of canon law, that is the prohibition of meat was deleted while the rest of the law was kept intact. it is his opinion that this specific deletion reflects the intent to exempt soup from the prohibition. He supports Father Serpa’s position.

vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/__P4O.HTM

This link is the Canon Law regarding penance. Just to clarify all Fridays, not only those of Lent are days of abstinence.

Our faith, as Roman Catholics, includes Sacred Scripture and Tradition. In our Tradition, we abstain from all mammals and fowl.

EWTN has a great link on all pertinent information, including broth and the like (which is not permitted, due to its meat taste): ewtn.com/faith/lent/fast.htm

Ohhhhhhhhhhh ICK!!! I just lost my appetite. :rotfl:

Hey folks, I’ve been posting this all over the place. Have you guys checked out all the yummy VEGETARIAN selections in the freezer case lately?

There’s some really good ones now. Nice “fill in” meals, for when you’re just sick of da fishies! :wink:

“Danima” Yes, this is correct. There is a little mini-debate about this, in another thread. But here is what it says in Canon Law:

"Canon 1251 – Abstinence from eating meat or another food according to the prescriptions of the conference of bishops is to be observed on Fridays throughout the year unless they are solemnities; abstinence and fast are to be observed on Ash Wednesday and on the Friday of the Passion and Death of Our Lord Jesus Christ.

This canon is taken from Poenitemini, part III, 112. Poenitemini exempted holy days of obligation from Friday abstinence; this canon extends that exemption to all solemnities whether they are of obligation or not. The Code also gives the conference of bishops the power to substitute another penance to be observed on Fridays in place of abstinence from meat".

Sadly, so many good, practicing Catholics… aren’t aware that if they DO eat meat on Friday… they must substitute another form of penance, in its place.

Previous posters have already given great advice. My rule of thumb is that if it’s cold-blooded, then it’s OK to eat.

P.S. It’s not OK to eat lawyers, unfortunately.

How about if it can make a noise don’t eat it… :smiley: :shrug:

I recall discussions in college [50years ago] in which it was contended that Cambell’s chicken noodle soup did not violate the prohibition against meat. [A reflection on the lack of meat in the soup. :D]

:rotfl:

You have no idea how glad I am to hear someone say this, especially the last part. I know too many of these good practicing Catholics who deny this, but then, what would the Christian life be without penance…?

new Catholic

Anyway, I got soup today. It’s tomato but I’m (fairly?) sure it has a chicken broth base. Bad Catholic or ok because it has no meat chunks in it? (it’s a friday in Lent…)

Here’s a word to the wise: If you’re in a Chinese restaurant to see an item on the menu touting “sea cucumbers,” then please be advised that it is not a vegetable! :eek:

.

BUT not a meat either… according to the Catholic church I believe.

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