Memorial Acclamation

Recently our parish has started using this as a response during the memorial acclamation:

We remember how you loved us to Your death,
And still we celebrate for You are with us here.
And we believe that we will see You
when you come in Your glory, Lord.
We remember, we celebrate, we believe!

These are lyrics from a modern hymn. Is this liturgically acceptable? I have always been under the impression that there are only 4 approved responses.

there options will be even more limited in the new missal so this won’t last long, if it does, it is a legitimate issue to raise, first with the pastor, then with the diocese if there is no reaction.

That particular response is from a Marty Haugen tune used in a GIA published setting (though my memory fails me at the moment). It should not be used since it is not one of the four responses in the Missal. As stated above, soon there will be only three approved responses, but I wouldn’t doubt it if we continue to hear so many other things…:frowning:

[quote="Marcus1977, post:1, topic:237391"]
Recently our parish has started using this as a response during the memorial acclamation:

We remember how you loved us to Your death,
And still we celebrate for You are with us here.
And we believe that we will see You
when you come in Your glory, Lord.
We remember, we celebrate, we believe!

These are lyrics from a modern hymn. Is this liturgically acceptable? I have always been under the impression that there are only 4 approved responses.

[/quote]

No, this may never be used as a memorial acclamation.

We have this point of liturgical abuse at our parish in the chicago suburbs also.

It is one of those issues that is so well disguised. It makes everyone coo with satisfaction, especially the leader of this liturgical abuse. It is usually spearheaded by the lay-person that is in charge of a worship comission or the music ministry.

It is now time brothers and sisters, to arm ourselves with the proper reference material to identify this abuse, call it out, and chase it out of town.

I recommend the following as a start:
a - General Instruction of The Roman Missal;
b - Redemptionis Sacramentum

Thank you so much for posting this. I just sent a kindly worded message to our pastor who is in the middle of rabid liturgical abuse specialists in our parish, and well … me.

The pastor is starting to feel the pressure. Please pray for him.

I hope my suggestion doesn't cause flames, I hope we can consider another possible solution.

I am the music director at my parish, a few oddities (not big ones) happen at our masses that I stepped into. The liturgy committee actually helps our priests stay in line. We do this "we remember how you loved us" thing as a memorial acclamation during Easter...they've been doing long before I got here and there is an emotional attachment to it. A couple years ago, because the translations are changing this year, I decided to keep it until the changeover. We'd have to learn a new one only to learn a new one again. THis advent we will absolutely be doing the new translations word for word, no question. I know that we are planing to use this time to fix more items as it is much easier to make these changes all at once, and have the explanations handy with the church changing the translation already.

Technically am I correct? no. But we will be, eventually.

Just an idea.. something could already be going on.

[quote="Marcus1977, post:1, topic:237391"]
Recently our parish has started using this as a response during the memorial acclamation:

We remember how you loved us to Your death,
And still we celebrate for You are with us here.
And we believe that we will see You
when you come in Your glory, Lord.
We remember, we celebrate, we believe!

These are lyrics from a modern hymn. Is this liturgically acceptable? I have always been under the impression that there are only 4 approved responses.

[/quote]

As much of an abuse that this is (and I am not defending it), it is closer to being like a memorial acclamation than "Christ has died. Christ is risen. Christ will come again." It is at least directed at Our Lord.

Anyone remember the 1980s addition of "Keep in mind that Christ has died for us. He is risen from the dead. He is our saving Lord and joy for all ages" as a memorial acclamation. People have taken so many liberties with the Mass.

I am so glad the new translation is coming out.

I am also glad the new translation is coming out. I would be even more filled with joy if a few liturgical abuse ministers would kindly step down. But, their ego is in the way. This has been a long and painful period.

[quote="agapewolf, post:7, topic:237391"]
I hope my suggestion doesn't cause flames, I hope we can consider another possible solution.

I am the music director at my parish, a few oddities (not big ones) happen at our masses that I stepped into. The liturgy committee actually helps our priests stay in line. We do this "we remember how you loved us" thing as a memorial acclamation during Easter...they've been doing long before I got here and there is an emotional attachment to it. A couple years ago, because the translations are changing this year, I decided to keep it until the changeover. We'd have to learn a new one only to learn a new one again. THis advent we will absolutely be doing the new translations word for word, no question. I know that we are planing to use this time to fix more items as it is much easier to make these changes all at once, and have the explanations handy with the church changing the translation already.

Technically am I correct? no. But we will be, eventually.

Just an idea.. something could already be going on.

[/quote]

How can you be helping the priest stay in line when it is you and the committee that is maintaining abuse?

Wow…such judgment when you know nothing about the situation. It is the priests that want to do abuses and the committee informs them, and by majority, nixes their ideas. And where did I say the committee decided this? I didn’t.

As I said, we will NOT be maintaining the abuse. I am choosing to change things slowly as I’ve had to drastically change other things that were way off. This acclamation at least states the same gist as the approved ones.

There was a thread on here recently about someone that was all upset about a few abuses he saw…they were relatively minor. He wrote or spoke to the priest about it and was put back in his place because the priest said to him he knew…and he’s working on it, but he had to things in a certain order and there were other circumstances he had to work out first.

Perhaps charity and patience might be worth something here.

This was the same exact acclamation used at my parish on Holy Thursday. It’s not liturgically appropriate since it does not correspond with the four prescribed texts in the Missal. If “We Remember” was prescribed in the Missal, then yes, it would be appropriate; however, it is not.

[quote="agapewolf, post:7, topic:237391"]
I hope my suggestion doesn't cause flames, I hope we can consider another possible solution.

I am the music director at my parish, a few oddities (not big ones) happen at our masses that I stepped into. The liturgy committee actually helps our priests stay in line. We do this "we remember how you loved us" thing as a memorial acclamation during Easter...they've been doing long before I got here and there is an emotional attachment to it. A couple years ago, because the translations are changing this year, I decided to keep it until the changeover. We'd have to learn a new one only to learn a new one again. THis advent we will absolutely be doing the new translations word for word, no question. I know that we are planing to use this time to fix more items as it is much easier to make these changes all at once, and have the explanations handy with the church changing the translation already.

Technically am I correct? no. But we will be, eventually.

Just an idea.. something could already be going on.

[/quote]

Seriously? You are continually breaking the rules because people have an "emotional attachment" to it? Wow.

I’m aware that the committee didn’t decide to do it, but the committee needs to decide not to do it.

You may be right, but “Christ has died” is in the book (for now), “keep in mind” is not. Granted, you don’t have to use “Christ has died”, I certainly don’t prefer it, but it is a valid option at this time.

No, apparently you didn’t read my post. Try again.

First of all, I was not addressing you with that comment.

2nd of all, if you actually READ my posts, you see that the decision has been made to not do it.

[quote=agapewolf]I decided to keep it until the changeover.
[/quote]

I have read your post, and if I recall, your decision was:
a) To use it now
b) THEN get rid of it in November

The key thing being the fact that you’re still using it.

No, we are ending it halfway through easter. The key part here is that we are ending it.

You have not read my posts because you’ve quoted things out of context and haven’t paid attention to ANYTHING ELSE. The important part of the timing and the reason for the process.

God forbid anyone have patience. You have no idea what the situation is, nor the trouble that would have been caused, or anything else. Let it go.

I guess it seems that today, the definition of “pastoral” is “breaking rules to keep people happy.”

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