Memorial acclamations

I remember as a child that certain Memorial acclamations were meant to be used with certain Eucharistic prayers. Does anyone else remember these? (I am not quite old enough to remember the Latin mass.) I asked our (very busy) priest about this and he handed me an OCP missal, in which it appears that all 4 can be used with any of the prayers. The most commonly used is 'Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again.
Is this one the most preferred because it is listed first?

[quote="VAC, post:1, topic:179741"]
I remember as a child that certain Memorial acclamations were meant to be used with certain Eucharistic prayers. Does anyone else remember these? (I am not quite old enough to remember the Latin mass.) I asked our (very busy) priest about this and he handed me an OCP missal, in which it appears that all 4 can be used with any of the prayers. The most commonly used is 'Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again.
Is this one the most preferred because it is listed first?

[/quote]

Did you grow up in Canada by any chance?

I ask only because in Canada, unlike in the US, each acclamation has its own introduction:
[LIST]
]*V: Let us proclaim the Mystery of Faith! R: Christ has died ...
]*V: Praise to You, Lord Jesus, firstborn from the dead! R: Dying you destroyed our death ...
]*V: We are faithful, Lord, to your command! R: When we eat this bread ...
]*V: Christ is Lord of all ages! R: Lord, by your cross ...
[/LIST]
The Sacramentary is clear that any of the four can be used with "Let us proclaim the mystery of faith!" but I've never heard any of the other three used without their specific intro.

In the US, any one can be used with any EP. I checked the 1974 Sacramentary, and it has been that way ever since at least '74.

It may be because the “Christ has died…” is listed first, but it is also the only one printed with musical notations (although music for the other 3 are in an appendix). Often (but not necessarily always) when several options are given, the first is the preferred one.

I remember that some priests used to have personal practices of using different acclamations according to the season. My own childhood pastor used to use “Dying you destroyed…” during Lent, and then “Lord, by your cross…” during Easter. Maybe you remember priests who used to use certain ones for certain EPs. Since any acclamation can be used with any EP, or anytime, these are perfectly legitimate options. In other words, your memory might be just fine, but what you remember was’t a rule, just a personal preference.

In any case, the “Christ has died…” acclamation is about to go away. It’s not a translation of the Latin text, and so when the new translation takes effect, we won’t hear it anymore.

Thanks. It would have been in the early '70's that I read it, so that makes a lot of sense.
Who knows how long it will be until the changes are implemented. Doesn't it take decades??

Not at all. Spent my whole life in Florida

Not necessarily, but it is the most clear and concise statement about our Faith.

I also found the following on Wikipedia:

Let us now proclaim the mystery of faith:

MA 1: **Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again. **

MA 2: **Dying you destroyed our death, rising you restored our life. Lord Jesus, come in glory.

MA 3: When we eat this bread and drink this cup, we proclaim your death, Lord Jesus, until you come in glory. **

MA 4: **Lord, by your cross and resurrection, you have set us free. You are the Savior of the World. **

The first two English acclamations are departures from the Latin typical edition of the Roman Missal. The first was a preexisting composition adopted in lieu of a translation of the first Latin acclamation, and the second was a new composition, derived from wording found in the first Easter Preface.

In Canada each acclamation is introduced with a unique introduction:

V: Let us proclaim the Mystery of Faith! R: Christ has died …
V: Praise to You, Lord Jesus, firstborn from the dead! R: Dying you destroyed our death …
V: We are faithful, Lord, to your command! R: When we eat this bread …
V: Christ is Lord of all ages! R: Lord, by your cross …

The French translation also has unique introductions, the second of which appropriates part of the Latin acclamation.

After the Memorial Acclamation is recited or sung, the Eucharistic prayer continues with the anamnesis.

Prior to the Ordo Missae of 1969, the Roman Rite did not have such a congregational acclamation and the words Mysterium fidei were incorporated within the Words of Institution.

A form of the Acclamation is used in the Book of Alternative Services of the Anglican Church of Canada.

Actually, for daily Mass, my pv uses “when we eat this bread…” He is tired of Christ has died. It’s not even in the Latin version of the Roman Missal. The upshot is that “Christ has died…” will, hopefully, go the way of the dinosaurs and be extinct. It is not in the new translations, although the USCCB has asked for an indult to retain it, which I hope is not granted.

That’s interesting that it’s not a translation of Latin, yet it’s in the first spot. Growing up I remember hearing all 4 acclamations used. Now it’s almost the ONLY one played except when I slip it in for different seasons.

It has taken decades:shrug:. We’re finally seeing the light at the end of the tunnel.

We should finally see the new translations in use in November 2009.

usccb.org/romanmissal

btw, I like those intros.

My parish still uses all of the acclamations you listed for the seasons even though we normally get the same Eucharistic prayer most of the year.

Wishful thinking, Fr?:smiley:

Generally, if our priest uses Eucharistic prayer 1, we use Christ has Died…, if he uses Prayer 2, we use Dying you destroyed…, if Prayer 3, When we eat…, and for Prayer 4, Lord by your cross…

If however, he decides to use the Eucharistic Prayers of Reconciliation 1 or 2, then all bets are off…lol, Sometimes, word comes up to the Choir or via the organist that we are to use memorial acclimation 2, 3 or 4, whichever the priest asks for that particular day. :slight_smile:

No, I honestly don’t think so. Not at this point. I do think that the new translation, scheduled to be implemented in Nov/Dec 2009 is finally going to be a reality.

The letters from Rome indicate that the Holy See is running-out of patience on this one. The translations themselves have received recognitio although there are still some minor details to be worked-out in the proper parts of the Mass (for the benefit of some of our readers, that means the prayers which change each Sunday–the ones “proper” to a particular day).

I don’t think we’re going to see any more delays.

You mean Nov/Dec 2010 or 2011 right? We are nearly at January 2010 and the new translation has not been implemented yet. So, Nov/Dec 2009 isn’t gonna happen.

James

RIGHT!

I forgot, this year isn’t a leap year, so I neglected to adjust my watch for daylight savings time.
:thumbsup:
The schedule is for Nov/Dec 2010 (most likely the start of the new liturgical year).

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