Mercedarians


#1

[ATTACH]8854[/ATTACH]Does anyone know if the Mercedarians say Mass in the Extraordinary Form? They have an amazing history and look pretty traditional. Any other information, aside from what is on their website, or experience with them?
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#2

At Our Lady of Lourdes in NW Philly they offer both forms. This is also a formation house, a few blocks from St Charles Seminary, where I met a few of them. They have an amazing group of men there, very supportive of the seminarians at SCS, and IIRC they’ve produced at least one vocation for the Cistercians at Spring Bank (Br Stephen).


#3

Dear CDNowak,

Thank you for your response. I am glad to hear they offer the EF Mass at least on Sundays and I assume on major feast days, since 3 of the feasts of their order were removed from the new calendar.

What kind of life do Mercedarians live? There isn’t much on their website and I hesitate to write to them until I am ready to “go for it.” From what I can tell, here in US, they mostly do parish work. Outside the country they do various forms of social work. Are there other kinds of ministries? Do they live in community? Does their day follow a certain regimentation?

I had some concerns reading over their website. There was an article about how, in the early 80s, the order, particularly in Latin America, wanted to redefine Our Lady of Mercy as Our Lady of Liberation. Which gave me reason for pause. That sounds like it came out of Liberation Theology which was very popular in Latin America in the early 1980s, but greatly condemned by the Church. I am curious if this type of thinking still permeates the order today?


#4

[quote="HCC, post:3, topic:213233"]
Dear CDNowak,

Thank you for your response. I am glad to hear they offer the EF Mass at least on Sundays and I assume on major feast days, since 3 of the feasts of their order were removed from the new calendar.

What kind of life do Mercedarians live? There isn't much on their website and I hesitate to write to them until I am ready to "go for it." From what I can tell, here in US, they mostly do parish work. Outside the country they do various forms of social work. Are there other kinds of ministries? Do they live in community? Does their day follow a certain regimentation?

I had some concerns reading over their website. There was an article about how, in the early 80s, the order, particularly in Latin America, wanted to redefine Our Lady of Mercy as Our Lady of Liberation. Which gave me reason for pause. That sounds like it came out of Liberation Theology which was very popular in Latin America in the early 1980s, but greatly condemned by the Church. I am curious if this type of thinking still permeates the order today?

[/quote]

I was a fellow religious seminarian at SCS, so most of my contact with them was in the halls or giving them a lift back to the parish/friary. They obviously had a strong community life it the house, and a fairly regular schedule. They maintain common prayer, at least in the evenings (was able to join them one vespers) and common supper. (I believe this is typical of the order in the US, but it is also a formation house where more attention is paid to the basics).

The seminarians I've met are very orthodox, no hint of liberation theology. I am sadly ill-informed of the nature of their work, outside parishes and parish schools here in the states.

I would recommend contacting them, though: either informally through facebook (Philly House), or directly.


Two of my former confrères are in the Mercedarian vocations video! {At 1:20 the bearded one at the top left of the image and the Cistercian (note the black scapular) in the lower left.} (image appears to be from SCS).


#5

We do live in common. Pray the Divine Office in Common – Morning and Evening and have COnventual Mass. We also make a communal Visit to the Most Blessed SAcrament, daily; recite the Rosary, daily (in common), have communal meals and recreation…

We follow the Rule of S. Augustine, given to us in 1235.


#6

I can tell you that I know Brother David personally (I messaged him about this thread), and I am from the Diocese of Lincoln, which is very orthodox.

He and Fr. James (pictured above) came here for the ordination of one of our diocesan priests a few months ago. I plan to visit them sometime when I get out to Philadelphia. They have a true devotion to Christ! (and also a great sense of humor)

There is a group simply titled "Mercedarian" on facebook, and their vocation director is also available through this medium.

God be with you in your discernment.

+VNV+


#7

[quote="FraDavid, post:5, topic:213233"]
We do live in common. Pray the Divine Office in Common -- Morning and Evening and have COnventual Mass. We also make a communal Visit to the Most Blessed SAcrament, daily; recite the Rosary, daily (in common), have communal meals and recreation...

We follow the Rule of S. Augustine, given to us in 1235.

[/quote]

Fra David,

Wonderful to have you here at CAF and in this thread in particular.

Don't know if you would remember me, I was one of the Cistercians over in Jersey, two years ago (tempus fugit).

Chris


#8

Thank you VeroNihilVerius for passing my thread on, I really appreciate it and please do keep me in your prayers as I discern.

FraDavid, thank you for the information. I am curious, what sort of work do Mercedarians typically do? Are all Mercedarians priests or are there religious brothers/ claustral oblates as well? Does one stay in PA and live an active monastic life, tied to the house there? Is there a cut off age for entrance? I am 35, would that be a problem?

I wish there was more vocation information on your website. I am very intrigued.

Thanks in advance.
~HCC

Also- Is there any way I can obtain a scapular of Our Lady of Mercy?


#9

CDNowak, how could i forget you? You Cistercians were always the ones causing all the noise and problems at the seminary… haha…

HCC,
In the UNited States, we exercise our redemptive charism through education in a parochial setting. All of our parishes, in the US, have a grade school attached to them. Furthermore, via preaching and catechesis we evangelize and spread the Faith to the pagan and to the Catholic, ultimately bringing both back to the Faith.

WE are a clerical Order, but we do have brothers, as well. We were founded as a “brothers’ community” and only became a clerical Institute in 1317. Since we are NOT a monastic community, if you enter and God calls you and gives you the grace of perseverence, you will likely NOT be tied to one house for the remainder of your religious life. We are a Mendicant community of friars. As to your age, I don’t see it has a barrier to acceptance into the community…

VNV – when are you coming to Philly??


#10

hi, how are the Mercedarians different from the Trinitarians? i searched the net and they seem to have been founded for the same purpose… thanks!


#11

Brother David,

Still working on it! Best times might be closer to the end of the year, or in the spring next year. Do you think there is a preferable time to come?

+VNV+


#12

I’m discerning with the Mercedarians and from what I’ve experienced so far in speaking on the phone with the vocations director and from hearing personal testimonies from friends who attend their parishes, they are top notch.


#13

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