MERGED: Mass Saturday/ Sunday


#1

I am not sure if this is the right place for this question and I have searched the internet (for some very little time) but I couldn't find the answer. And with one look at this page I didn't saw this topic. So if this the wrong place, please inform me.

Is it true that if you attend Mass on Saturday this counts as attending on a Sunday? I know some people are doing it like this. And I have done this myself too at Christmas and Easter.
Besides that, I vaguely remember, every catholic should go at least once a year at Easter. So if he is going on a Saturday occasionally, this can't be wrong?

From what time does it count as a Sunday Mass?


#2

To help your vague memory, and get you into the right framework, I suggest you read this page: beginningcatholic.com/precepts-of-the-catholic-church.html. It explains the basic things a Catholic should be doing to live their faith, such as attending Mass on Sundays.

The second point is that Mass on a Saturday only counts as Sunday Mass when it is a "vigil Mass" for the Sunday. This is different from the Mass that is specially for that Saturday: it has the prayers and readings of the Sunday Mass*. It isn't to do with watching the clock, although I don't expect a vigil Mass would be allowed early in the day. If you look on a church noticeboard or bulletin, Mass on a Saturday evening will usually have "vigil Mass" or "for Sunday" written next to the time, to let people know that this is the vigil Mass for Sunday rather than the usual Saturday Mass.

If you never attended a weekday Mass, you might not have realised that they're a bit different from Sunday Masses, on top of having different readings.

*Some vigil Masses have special prayers and/or readings just for the vigil, which are different from the prayers and/or readings on Sunday morning, as well as different from the normal Saturday Mass prayers and/or readings. But they still count as Mass for the feast they're a vigil for. For example, Midnight Mass has different readings from Christmas morning Mass, but counts as Christmas Mass. The Easter Vigil has different readings and prayers (very different) from Easter morning Mass, but it still counts as Easter Mass. Don't worry to much about this, if it confuses you.


#3

[quote="TypesAndShadows, post:2, topic:296344"]
The second point is that Mass on a Saturday only counts as Sunday Mass when it is a "vigil Mass" for the Sunday. This is different from the Mass that is specially for that Saturday: it has the prayers and readings of the Sunday Mass*. It isn't to do with watching the clock, although I don't expect a vigil Mass would be allowed early in the day. If you look on a church noticeboard or bulletin, Mass on a Saturday evening will usually have "vigil Mass" or "for Sunday" written next to the time, to let people know that this is the vigil Mass for Sunday rather than the usual Saturday Mass.

*Some vigil Masses have special prayers and/or readings just for the vigil, which are different from the prayers and/or readings on Sunday morning, as well as different from the normal Saturday Mass prayers and/or readings. But they still count as Mass for the feast they're a vigil for. Don't worry to much about this, if it confuses you.

[/quote]

Actually, the Saturday evening Mass IS a Sunday Mass. It isn't a vigil in the regular meaning of the word.

If I understand correctly, Sunday is a privileged day. It begins at First Vespers (sundown) on Saturday and ends at 11:59 on Sunday. That is how Sunday is set up in Liturgy of the Hours. Hence, a Saturday evening Mass at 5 p.m., a Sunday morning Mass at 7 a.m., a 8 p.m. Sunday Mass all satisfy the obligation.

So to recap: Saturday evening Mass can be a Sunday Mass. It has to be in the evening. However, it has to be intended to be a Sunday Mass with the prayers and readings of the Sunday Mass. If however, the priest uses the prayers (collect, offeratory and post-communion) and readings of the Saturday Mass, then it's not a Sunday Mass. So a Mass at 6 p.m. can be either a Saturday Daily Mass or a Sunday Mass. It depends on the readings and prayers and the priest's intention.


#4

[quote="Parels, post:1, topic:296344"]
I am not sure if this is the right place for this question and I have searched the internet (for some very little time) but I couldn't find the answer. And with one look at this page I didn't saw this topic. So if this the wrong place, please inform me.

Is it true that if you attend Mass on Saturday this counts as attending on a Sunday? I know some people are doing it like this. And I have done this myself too at Christmas and Easter.
Besides that, I vaguely remember, every catholic should go at least once a year at Easter. So if he is going on a Saturday occasionally, this can't be wrong?

From what time does it count as a Sunday Mass?

[/quote]

Anytime after, IIRC, 4pm on Saturday counts as your Sunday obligation. I'll be going to Mass tomorrow at 5pm as I will be out of town all day Sunday.


#5

[quote="garn9173, post:4, topic:296344"]
Anytime after, IIRC, 4pm on Saturday counts as your Sunday obligation. I'll be going to Mass tomorrow night at 5pm as I will be out of town all day Sunday.

[/quote]

Actually, no. It depends on the priest's intent. If he uses the readings and prayers of the Mass of the Day, it isn't a Sunday Mass. It's a daily Mass that just happens to be on a Saturday evening. These, however, are few and far between. They would probably be listed as a weekday Mass in the bulletin and on the marquis.

If he uses the Sunday readings and prayers, it's a Sunday Mass. Usually, these are stated as a Sunday Mass, "Sunday Vigil Mass" or "Anticipated Sunday Mass" on bulletins and marquis. So they are really hard to miss.


#6

Yes usually the Saturday "evening" Mass fulfills your Sunday obligation. It depends on the readings used (if they are for that Sundays Mass which they usually are...) and so on...

In my parish for example, there is a Saturday 5pm Mass which I know counts for your Sunday obligation. I like to personally attend the Sunday morning Mass, but yes, it usually does count.


#7

[quote="PacoG, post:3, topic:296344"]
If I understand correctly, Sunday is a privileged day. It begins at First Vespers (sundown) on Saturday and ends at 11:59 on Sunday. That is how Sunday is set up in Liturgy of the Hours. Hence, a Saturday evening Mass at 5 p.m., a Sunday morning Mass at 7 a.m., a 8 p.m. Sunday Mass all satisfy the obligation.

[/quote]

Just a minor clarification: per canon law, liturgical days go from midnight to midnight, so Sunday does not liturgically start at first vespers.

HOWEVER, your first statement, that Sunday is a privileged day, is very correct, because the church has stated that for the purposes of worship, the Sunday Obligation can be fulfilled starting at first vespers (aka, for the purpose of worship, "Sunday" is "extended"... but that is not to say that the liturgical day itself is changed)


#8

[quote="PacoG, post:5, topic:296344"]
Actually, no. It depends on the priest's intent. If he uses the readings and prayers of the Mass of the Day, it isn't a Sunday Mass. It's a daily Mass that just happens to be on a Saturday evening. These, however, are few and far between. They would probably be listed as a weekday Mass in the bulletin and on the marquis.

If he uses the Sunday readings and prayers, it's a Sunday Mass. Usually, these are stated as a Sunday Mass, "Sunday Vigil Mass" or "Anticipated Sunday Mass" on bulletins and marquis. So they are really hard to miss.

[/quote]

The reading are not relevant. Any Saturday evening Mass fulfills the Sunday obligation even if the Sunday readings are not used.

Can. 1248 §1 The obligation of assisting at Mass is satisfied wherever Mass is celebrated in a Catholic rite either on a Holyday itself or on the evening of the previous day.


#9

Let’s also keep in mind that in many rural Parishes, that is served by a Priest who covers more than one Parish, Saturday evening maybe the only Mass of the weekend.


#10

The purpose of the Saturday Vigil Mass, which is still not permitted in some countries, was primarily for those who could not attend Mass on Sundays due to a work obligation, such as an on-call physician or police officer. It was never intended as a "Mass of convenience," which is largely what it has become in most parishes. In my experience, the Saturday Vigil Mass is more likely than Sunday Masses to have large numbers of people arriving late and leaving early, not singing, and dressed like slobs.


#11

As many posters have said, the Saturday vigil Mass fulfills the obligation to attend Mass on Sundays. However...

[quote="Parels, post:1, topic:296344"]
I vaguely remember, every catholic should go at least once a year at Easter.

[/quote]

Catholics are obliged to go to Mass every Sunday. The "once a year at Easter" obligation you vaguely remember probably refers to confession and holy communion. But if you miss your Sunday Mass obligation on any Sunday without a reasonable cause, you have committed a sin, possibly a mortal sin, in which case you need to go to confession before you can receive.


#12

[quote="Parels, post:1, topic:296344"]
I am not sure if this is the right place for this question and I have searched the internet (for some very little time) but I couldn't find the answer. And with one look at this page I didn't saw this topic. So if this the wrong place, please inform me.

Is it true that if you attend Mass on Saturday this counts as attending on a Sunday? I know some people are doing it like this. And I have done this myself too at Christmas and Easter.
Besides that, I vaguely remember, every catholic should go at least once a year at Easter. So if he is going on a Saturday occasionally, this can't be wrong?

From what time does it count as a Sunday Mass?

[/quote]

Every Catholic must go to mass every Sunday. However, he doesn't need to receive communion at every mass. He need only receive once a year during between Ash Wednesday and Pentacaust (the Easter season).

A Saturday evening mass counts as a Sunday mass, according to current Church law. Any mass after 4 pm I believe. For instance, a Saturday evening funeral mass would count as a Sunday mass. It need not be labeled as a "vigil" or "anticipation" mass.


#13

An error in part of several posts...on this one point:

The** intent of the priest and the readings** are not a Canon Law factor for Sunday obligation by assisting at Mass on Saturday...but normally no earlier than 4 p.m.

Can. 1248 §1. A person who assists at **a Mass **celebrated anywhere in a Catholic rite either on the feast day itself or in the evening of the preceding day satisfies the obligation of participating in the Mass.
vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/__P4N.HTM

EWTN Q&A...answer ROME, 21 OCT. 2008 (ZENIT)
Answered by Legionary of Christ Father Edward McNamara, professor of liturgy at the Regina Apostolorum university.

This** canon also states** that Catholics** may fulfill their Sunday and holy-day obligations** by assisting at any Catholic Mass after this time. Therefore,** if a Catholic were to attend a wedding at this time, even if the ceremony lacked the elements proper to a Sunday Mass, he or she would be fulfilling the Sunday precept.

ewtn.com/library/liturgy/zlitur242.htm**

So a Funeral or Nuptial Mass after 4 p.m. on Saturday would cover Sunday Mass obligation...even a Saturday Mass after 4 p.m. with that Saturday's readings...would count.

Pax Christi


#14

[quote="Cavaille-Coll, post:10, topic:296344"]
The purpose of the Saturday Vigil Mass, which is still not permitted in some countries, was primarily for those who could not attend Mass on Sundays due to a work obligation, such as an on-call physician or police officer. It was never intended as a "Mass of convenience," which is largely what it has become in most parishes. In my experience, the Saturday Vigil Mass is more likely than Sunday Masses to have large numbers of people arriving late and leaving early, not singing, and dressed like slobs.

[/quote]

Regardless of initial intent, this is no longer the case. By virtue of the present law, anyone can go to any Catholic Mass on Saturday evening and fulfill the Sunday obligation for any reason, even convenience or preference.

Further, any Mass on Saturday evening will fulfill the obligation, even if the Mass were the Mass of Saturday, with Saturday readings. It does not need to use the Sunday formularies.


#15

[quote="A_G, post:6, topic:296344"]
Yes usually the Saturday "evening" Mass fulfills your Sunday obligation. It depends on the readings used (if they are for that Sundays Mass which they usually are...) and so on...

In my parish for example, there is a Saturday 5pm Mass which I know counts for your Sunday obligation. I like to personally attend the Sunday morning Mass, but yes, it usually does count.

[/quote]

On the readings, this is not true. The readings don't matter; they could be of a funeral or wedding, an Extraordinary Form Saturday Mass, Ordinary Form Saturday Mass, Byzantine Divine Liturgy, etc. The key thing is the time: it should be during the time accepted/approved for anticipated Sunday Masses or Evening Prayer.


#16

[quote="Cavaille-Coll, post:10, topic:296344"]
The purpose of the Saturday Vigil Mass, which is still not permitted in some countries, was primarily for those who could not attend Mass on Sundays due to a work obligation, such as an on-call physician or police officer. It was never intended as a "Mass of convenience," which is largely what it has become in most parishes. In my experience, the Saturday Vigil Mass is more likely than Sunday Masses to have large numbers of people arriving late and leaving early, not singing, and dressed like slobs.

[/quote]

It was changed in 1983 with the new code of canon law. A Saturday mass is a perfectly acceptable mass for anyone to attend.


#17

[quote="porthos11, post:15, topic:296344"]
On the readings, this is not true. The readings don't matter; they could be of a funeral or wedding, an Extraordinary Form Saturday Mass, Ordinary Form Saturday Mass, Byzantine Divine Liturgy, etc. The key thing is the time: it should be during the time accepted/approved for anticipated Sunday Masses or Evening Prayer.

[/quote]

:thumbsup:

Exactly, the readings used do not need to be the Sunday readings. According to Canon law, any Mass between generally 4pm on Saturday and 12am Sunday fulfills requirements of the Sunday obligation. It is up to the local bishop to set the exact times.

ewtn.com/vexperts/showmessage.asp?number=400900&Pg=Forum8&Pgnu=1&recnu=1


#18

Hi I was wondering wether to go to the Saturday vigil mass and Sunday mass since its the as the Sunday and same sermon and readings is there any point in going to the vigil mass ?
Or should Go ?

Thanks chuck


#19

The anticipated Mass on Saturday is the same as a Sunday Mass. If you want to go to Mass every day, look for a Saturday morning Mass. The evening Mass is there to assist people in scheduling so that it is easy to make sure everyone can get to Mass each week.


#20

[quote="Chuck1, post:18, topic:296344"]
Hi I was wondering wether to go to the Saturday vigil mass and Sunday mass since its the as the Sunday and same sermon and readings is there any point in going to the vigil mass ?
Or should Go ?

Thanks chuck

[/quote]

As I compose this post, it comes to be that it may sound critical, but it is not intended to be.

Is there any point? I would say yes there is. Do we read the bible or piece of scripture again, after having already read it once? If the same logic hold true, what's the point?

If we view the Mass as our entering into the never ending Heavenly Liturgy with all the angels and saints, there are no "reruns".

Peace and all good!


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