MERGED: Receiving extreme unction 1962/when unconscious


#1

When somebody receives the last rites while unconscious, particularly right before he or she dies, is the sacrament entirely valid and will he or she go straight to heaven?

I am asking this because I recently read something about when John F. Kennedy received the last rites after he was shot, the priest that anointed him said that although Kennedy's mind clearly had no idea what was going on, his soul was present and was aware of the situation, therefore the sacrament was entirely valid.

Is this the right way to think about it?


#2

There are no guarantees someone goes straight to heaven.

The grace of God does not depend on the consciousness of a person.


#3

[quote="andyklein, post:1, topic:308204"]
When somebody receives the last rites while unconscious, particularly right before he or she dies, is the sacrament entirely valid and will he or she go straight to heaven?

I am asking this because I recently read something about when John F. Kennedy received the last rites after he was shot, the priest that anointed him said that although Kennedy's mind clearly had no idea what was going on, his soul was present and was aware of the situation, therefore the sacrament was entirely valid.

Is this the right way to think about it?

[/quote]

Yes, I would imagine the soul would be aware of the situation and the Last Rites would be valid. However, as ConstantineTG mentioned, they are no guarantee of Heaven.


#4

:)

[quote="andyklein, post:1, topic:308204"]
When somebody receives the last rites while unconscious, particularly right before he or she dies, is the sacrament entirely valid and will he or she go straight to heaven?

I am asking this because I recently read something about when John F. Kennedy received the last rites after he was shot, the priest that anointed him said that although Kennedy's mind clearly had no idea what was going on, his soul was present and was aware of the situation, therefore the sacrament was entirely valid.

Is this the right way to think about it?

[/quote]


#5

If that person is alive, then the Sacrament has all of its usual efficacy. This is not like confession, where one must be interactive with the Priest. From the Catechism:

III. HOW IS THIS SACRAMENT CELEBRATED?

1517 Like all the sacraments the Anointing of the Sick is a liturgical and communal celebration,132 whether it takes place in the family home, a hospital or church, for a single sick person or a whole group of sick persons. It is very fitting to celebrate it within the Eucharist, the memorial of the Lord's Passover. If circumstances suggest it, the celebration of the sacrament can be preceded by the sacrament of Penance and followed by the sacrament of the Eucharist. As the sacrament of Christ's Passover the Eucharist should always be the last sacrament of the earthly journey, the "viaticum" for "passing over" to eternal life.

1518 Word and sacrament form an indivisible whole. The Liturgy of the Word, preceded by an act of repentance, opens the celebration. The words of Christ, the witness of the apostles, awaken the faith of the sick person and of the community to ask the Lord for the strength of his Spirit.

1519 The celebration of the sacrament includes the following principal elements: the "priests of the Church"133 - in silence - lay hands on the sick; they pray over them in the faith of the Church134 - this is the epiclesis proper to this sacrament; they then anoint them with oil blessed, if possible, by the bishop.

These liturgical actions indicate what grace this sacrament confers upon the sick.

IV. THE EFFECTS OF THE CELEBRATION OF THIS SACRAMENT

1520 A particular gift of the Holy Spirit. The first grace of this sacrament is one of strengthening, peace and courage to overcome the difficulties that go with the condition of serious illness or the frailty of old age. This grace is a gift of the Holy Spirit, who renews trust and faith in God and strengthens against the temptations of the evil one, the temptation to discouragement and anguish in the face of death.135 This assistance from the Lord by the power of his Spirit is meant to lead the sick person to healing of the soul, but also of the body if such is God's will.136 Furthermore, "if he has committed sins, he will be forgiven."137

1521 Union with the passion of Christ. By the grace of this sacrament the sick person receives the strength and the gift of uniting himself more closely to Christ's Passion: in a certain way he is consecrated to bear fruit by configuration to the Savior's redemptive Passion. Suffering, a consequence of original sin, acquires a new meaning; it becomes a participation in the saving work of Jesus.

1522 An ecclesial grace. The sick who receive this sacrament, "by freely uniting themselves to the passion and death of Christ," "contribute to the good of the People of God."138 By celebrating this sacrament the Church, in the communion of saints, intercedes for the benefit of the sick person, and he, for his part, through the grace of this sacrament, contributes to the sanctification of the Church and to the good of all men for whom the Church suffers and offers herself through Christ to God the Father.

1523 A preparation for the final journey. If the sacrament of anointing of the sick is given to all who suffer from serious illness and infirmity, even more rightly is it given to those at the point of departing this life; so it is also called sacramentum exeuntium (the sacrament of those departing).139 The Anointing of the Sick completes our conformity to the death and Resurrection of Christ, just as Baptism began it. It completes the holy anointings that mark the whole Christian life: that of Baptism which sealed the new life in us, and that of Confirmation which strengthened us for the combat of this life. This last anointing fortifies the end of our earthly life like a solid rampart for the final struggles before entering the Father's house.

1532 The special grace of the sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick has as its effects:
- the uniting of the sick person to the passion of Christ, for his own good and that of the whole Church;
- the strengthening, peace, and courage to endure in a Christian manner the sufferings of illness or old age;
- the forgiveness of sins, if the sick person was not able to obtain it through the sacrament of Penance;
- the restoration of health, if it is conducive to the salvation of his soul;
- the preparation for passing over to eternal life.


#6

Dear Brothers and Sisters, I have a question:

I know that the current rite of unction has the forgiveness of sins if the person is in an invalid state (aka unconscious). Does the 1962 Version have the same power? Namely, forgiveness of sins if someone is unconscious?


#7

Does it have the same power or the same rite? Of course it would have the same power. A sacrament’s a sacrament, regardless of whether it’s the older books or the current ones, provided you’re using a form approved by the Church.

-ACEGC


#8

[quote="edward_george, post:7, topic:308204"]
Does it have the same power or the same rite? Of course it would have the same power. A sacrament's a sacrament, regardless of whether it's the older books or the current ones, provided you're using a form approved by the Church.

-ACEGC

[/quote]

Thank you for the answer. I was looking at the Sacramental power. I thought it couldn't change, but I was 100 on the details. I am certain that it is a beautiful Sacrament, New or Old Rite, although I have not expierienced it yet. Our Pastor used to have it after a Prayer service that was after MASS on Sundays, with our LORD Exposed. I did not go up to recieve Anointing as I was not sick, but others did.


#9

[quote="mymamamary, post:6, topic:308204"]
Dear Brothers and Sisters, I have a question:

I know that the current rite of unction has the forgiveness of sins if the person is in an invalid state (aka unconscious). Does the 1962 Version have the same power? Namely, forgiveness of sins if someone is unconscious?

[/quote]

1917 CIC:Canon 942
This sacrament is not to be conferred on those who are impenitent,
persevering contumaciously in manifest mortal sin; if there is doubt
about this, it should be conferred under condition.

Canon 943
Nevertheless, it should be absolutely conferred on those
who, when they were in possession of their faculties, had at least
implicitly asked or who seemed to ask, even if they
later lost their senses or the use of reason.

1983 CIC: Canon 1006
This sacrament is to be conferred on the sick who at least
implicitly requested it when they were in control of their faculties.

Canon 1007
The anointing of the sick is not to be conferred upon those
who persevere obstinately in manifest grave sin.


#10

[quote="andyklein, post:1, topic:308204"]
When somebody receives the last rites while unconscious, particularly right before he or she dies, is the sacrament entirely valid and will he or she go straight to heaven?

I am asking this because I recently read something about when John F. Kennedy received the last rites after he was shot, the priest that anointed him said that although Kennedy's mind clearly had no idea what was going on, his soul was present and was aware of the situation, therefore the sacrament was entirely valid.

Is this the right way to think about it?

[/quote]

that is correct. if the soul is still in the body, then the sacrament "works."


#11

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